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Official McLaren F1 certification service announced as McLaren Special Operations reveals F1 GTR '25R' restoration at Hampton Court Concours of Elegance

31 Aug 2018

First factory programme to authenticate McLaren F1 supercar now available to owners
New service aims to safeguard originality of iconic car for future generations
Ex-Le Mans F1 GTR ‘25R’ emerges from rebuild by McLaren Special Operations as fully restored, first F1 Certified car
McLaren Automotive, the British manufacturer of luxury, high-performance sportscars and supercars, today introduces a new service to authenticate the heritage of iconic McLaren F1 supercars. The launch of the new programme is coincident with the unveiling of the first F1 to be approved for certification, the renowned ‘25R’ 1997 F1 GTR Longtail. Pristine after a full restoration to ‘as new’ condition by McLaren Special Operations, the last F1 GTR to compete in period is one of the stars of the Hampton Court Concours of Elegance (31 August – 2 September 2018).

“Even among F1 GTRs, this car, designated ‘25R’, is unique – and now it is as near to being new as we can make it,” commented Ansar Ali, Managing Director, McLaren Special Operations (MSO). “The car is the exemplar of everything that the new certification programme stands for and we are proud to have ‘25R’ as the very first McLaren F1 Certified car.”

Announced at Hampton Court with the unveiling of the chassis number 25 car, the F1 Certified programme has been developed to guarantee the authenticity of both road and track versions of the Le Mans-winning supercar, offering ultimate peace of mind for current and future owners. A unique Certificate of Authenticity – which McLaren Automotive is the only body in the world able to issue – authenticates a car’s provenance, originality, service life, road/race history and condition. Conformity with the original specification and to any McLaren-sanctioned upgrades is confirmed by reference to the factory archives.

Along with the certificate, owners receive a bespoke illustrated book documenting the history of their car. In total 106 McLaren F1s were built between 1993-98, among them 64 road cars and 28 GTR race cars, and all are eligible for the scheme.


JALOPNIK
Get Your McLaren F1 Certified To Make Sure It's Not Fake

Justin T. Westbrook

You used to lay awake with hopes of owning a McLaren F1. Then you worked hard and made enough money and you bought one. Congratulations. But now McLaren wants to keep you awake wondering if your McLaren F1 is legitimate.


The good news is you can pay McLaren even more money now to certify your F1. McLaren Special Operations has announced a new certification service to guarantee the authenticity of all of the McLaren F1s that are out there, including both road cars and race cars.

To get a certificate of authenticity, only McLaren Automotive can comb over your car’s background and compare it with company archives, including provenance, service life, condition, race history and originality.

All of this to confirm that you are indeed a very special person for owning a very special McLaren F1, valued at millions and millions of special dollars. I just can’t help but feel like this is just another barrier to convincing owners to actually drive their F1s. For what’s supposedly one of the best engineered driving experiences ever, judging how much it actually gets driven even harsher seems like unfortunate discouragement of a good time.

Jalopnik has reached out to McLaren to ask if the certification service costs owners anything and we’ll let you know if we hear back.
For the first several years after production had finished, most secondary market sales of F1s were handled by McLaren, who acted as agent and received a commission from the seller. A standard part of that service was a full inspection of the car, and documentation of its production and service history.
In recent years, the majority of secondary market sales have been done through independents, such as Tom Hartley Jr, Symbolic, and RM-Sothebys - used car salesmen whose knowledge of the F1 in general and any specific F1 chassis is limited to what a schoolboy would find in a quick Google search.

I see this new McLaren service as being an attempt by MSO to reinvigorate their relationships with those F1 owners with whom contact has diminished. It won't have any effect on the F1 market, although it may help McLaren to get more mandates to buy or sell F1s.

As for "authenticity", F1s are sufficiently sophisticated and unique in their technology that it would be extremely difficult to make a forgery. A 250 GTO used a standard Ferrari engine block and gearbox that were used in other models. The bodies and chassis were crude metalwork. In contrast, the F1s' engine and transaxle were unique to the car. How would someone get the moulds for all the CF bodywork? Just procuring something like an ersatz windshield that would fit an F1 would be a big project. The only place in the world from which one can buy the cars' unique tyres is McLaren Automotive (or from them via Mac Philly).

The Jalopnik writer asks whether McLaren might offer this certification service to F1 owners free of charge. The chances of that are less than the chances that Stoffel Vandoorne will win this year's World Drivers' Championship.
 

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For the first several years after production had finished, most secondary market sales of F1s were handled by McLaren, who acted as agent and received a commission from the seller. A standard part of that service was a full inspection of the car, and documentation of its production and service history.
In recent years, the majority of secondary market sales have been done through independents, such as Tom Hartley Jr, Symbolic, and RM-Sothebys - used car salesmen whose knowledge of the F1 in general and any specific F1 chassis is limited to what a schoolboy would find in a quick Google search.

I see this new McLaren service as being an attempt by MSO to reinvigorate their relationships with those F1 owners with whom contact has diminished. It won't have any effect on the F1 market, although it may help McLaren to get more mandates to buy or sell F1s.

As for "authenticity", F1s are sufficiently sophisticated and unique in their technology that it would be extremely difficult to make a forgery. A 250 GTO used a standard Ferrari engine block and gearbox that were used in other models. The bodies and chassis were crude metalwork. In contrast, the F1s' engine and transaxle were unique to the car. How would someone get the moulds for all the CF bodywork? Just procuring something like an ersatz windshield that would fit an F1 would be a big project. The only place in the world from which one can buy the cars' unique tyres is McLaren Automotive (or from them via Mac Philly).

The Jalopnik writer asks whether McLaren might offer this certification service to F1 owners free of charge. The chances of that are less than the chances that Stoffel Vandoorne will win this year's World Drivers' Championship.
Nice background write up—thanks.
As for "authenticity"—would the concern be conversion of F1 road cars to 25R or GTR specs?
I remember looking at one when the F1 first came out—magnificent machine
:)
 

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As for "authenticity"—would the concern be conversion of F1 road cars to 25R or GTR specs?
I remember looking at one when the F1 first came out—magnificent machine
:)
As far as taking a road car and trying to make it into a GTR, the values of the two versions are similar (apart from the Le Mans winner), so the potential upside to the fraudster would be small or possibly nil - with a substantial likelihood of being found out. Further, in the process of trying to turn a road car into a GTR, he would have ruined a very valuable road car.
Apart from the unattractive risk/reward, there would be serious technical issues. There are numerous differences in detail, but the biggest difference that comes to mind is that in the GTRs the entire wiring loom is situated in the right-side passenger space. Also, IIRC in the GTRs the engine oil tank is on the opposite side to that in the road cars. Those are not the easiest things to move around.

It would be even harder to change a road car to the long-tail GTR spec. The long-tail has different suspension pick-up points and a sequential gear-shift.
 

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anyone who knows who owns vehicle #22 and #39? to my humble information there is 65 roadcars and NOT 64.. could this be true?? who owns the last vehicle ie 65 then?? some say it's chassi number #73 a special last treat for Ayrton Senna Foundation?? Could this be true??
Chassis #39 is supposely located in Mexico. We don't know the whole story, but it's secretly kept there.
 

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anyone who knows who owns vehicle #22 and #39? to my humble information there is 65 roadcars and NOT 64.. could this be true?? who owns the last vehicle ie 65 then?? some say it's chassi number #73 a special last treat for Ayrton Senna Foundation?? Could this be true??
#39 was registered in the U.K. but was later shipped, it arrived in December 24, 1997 to Mexico as a Christmas gift it came from Mclaren factory specs as it looks in the pictures, they only made 1 of 1 in this configuration, the owner of this car was a drug lord who was killed in the early 2000s, When he died the original keys where lost, his family reached out to Mclaren for the keys and documentation but Mclaren declined at first due to the history of the original owner, but then changed their mind due to the value of the car and asked 200k dollars for new keys but the family never purchased them so it remains without keys and documentation, the car was later hidden in fear of it being seized, Mclaren keeps registry of the location of every Mclaren f1 and the last time they were seen except #039, nobody knows where it’s being kept, but it’s been stored somewhere in Mexico, Culiacan since 2004, and hasn’t been seen again for 15 years, there’s an old video of the #039 and the owners kids
 

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#39 was registered in the U.K. but was later shipped, it arrived in December 24, 1997 to Mexico as a Christmas gift it came from Mclaren factory specs as it looks in the pictures, they only made 1 of 1 in this configuration, the owner of this car was a drug lord who was killed in the early 2000s, When he died the original keys where lost, his family reached out to Mclaren for the keys and documentation but Mclaren declined at first due to the history of the original owner, but then changed their mind due to the value of the car and asked 200k dollars for new keys but the family never purchased them so it remains without keys and documentation, the car was later hidden in fear of it being seized, Mclaren keeps registry of the location of every Mclaren f1 and the last time they were seen except #039, nobody knows where it’s being kept, but it’s been stored somewhere in Mexico, Culiacan since 2004, and hasn’t been seen again for 15 years, there’s an old video of the #039 and the owners kids
I may have to make it a mission to find and buy this car! Lol, have been researching Culiacan Mexico for the last 15 min or so... Certainly not a good place to go!
 

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#069 is one of at least two, and probably three, McLaren F1s owned by Francois Perrodo. The other one that is certain to be part of his collection is the very unique "Cesar" liveried F1 GTR, chassis 05R.

.>8^)
ER
 

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Does anyone know what happened to #001. I saw it in chicago in 2014 and haven't seen it since.
Still in Chicago and part of the most impressive collection of McLarens in the world outside of Woking.

.>8^)
ER
 

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Out of 106 cars were made, how many of them were crashed and totaled?
Macabre story of Christopher Dawes who crashed his in 1999 in the UK. He and his two passengers were killed.
Interesting background on him, and terrible conclusion to three lives.
 

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Out of 106 cars were made, how many of them were crashed and totaled?
Peloton25 answered this in a Q&A the other day.so I should know the answer... I believe it was 5 gone, but I’m sure he’ll correct me if I’m wrong!
 

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I don't keep up with the ownership ledger of the F1s, but there is a McL Orange one up for sale in the new online issue of the Dupont Registry -- apparently two for sale (one in the U.S.; one in Europe), both listed by Knight International out of Colorado.
 

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I don't keep up with the ownership ledger of the F1s, but there is a McL Orange one up for sale in the new online issue of the Dupont Registry -- apparently two for sale (one in the U.S.; one in Europe), both listed by Knight International out of Colorado.
I mean no disrespect to anyone's business, but WTF is Knight International? It's possible that I wouldn't have heard of them operating in the US, but on their website they claim to have a London office - but no address is listed and no ID of any kind shows up in searches for a Knight International in London. I have a pretty good handle on the exotic car dealers here in the UK, especially in London, especially if they're involved with F1s, and I have never heard of Knight International. There might be a guy called Gary Knight who has been involved in some exotic car sales, and of course anything is possible, but I am very sceptical that Knight International "have" two F1s for sale.
 

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DuPont ad is a fake!

David Clark in the UK is handling the sale of the McLaren corporate '97 Gulf F1 GTR Longtail.
 

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Well, all I can say is I ran a full-color one-page ad in the Dupont Registry one time, and it cost me nearly $20k.
AND, Knight International has a very impressive web page. Would seem to be a very expensive hoax, if it is one.
 
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