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Musk owned chassis 067 but sold it in 2007 to a Minnesota investment banker in a cash crunch to support his Tesla and SpaceX ventures. With Elon at the wheel in September 2003, this chassis was actually my very first encounter with a McLaren F1 road car.

A couple of years after Musk sold it, the car famously caught fire in Santa Rosa, California after several months in storage due to a catalytic convertor problem. It appeared totalled, but was able to be rebuilt by the boys at MSO in Woking over the next 12 months or so, preserving the majority of the original chassis. The gentleman who purchased it from Musk still has the car in in his collection today, which now also includes a McLaren P1.

Here's a couple of shots of 067 taken recently in the owner's garage by my friend Alex Bellus.





>8^)
ER
Why would Elon Musk need the money from selling his F1 in 2007 to fund his business ventures? How could the money he received from selling his F1 in 2007 make a real difference to him back then?
 

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Why would Elon Musk need the money from selling his F1 in 2007 to fund his business ventures? How could the money he received from selling his F1 in 2007 make a real difference to him back then?
I have no idea about his financial circumstances, but he has never struck me as a "car guy".
 

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068 is in Costa Rica, and the long lost 039 is in Culican, Mexico.

Erik, did I miss anything?
068 left Costa Rica in mid 2009 after four years and returned to the USA, being acquired by a British collector living in the Boston area. He ended up keeping the car for just one year before selling it to a UK buyer. A month after that transaction took place, chassis 062 sold at auction in Monterey for nearly a million more than the prior transaction for 068 despite there being little difference in those two cars from the perspective of condition or mileage. The UK buyer took the opportunity to almost immediately flip the car for profit, selling it to a Mexican owner. I believe the car has spent most of its time since then in South Texas. There was a rumor the car had been resold again this past year through Ferrari Houston, but at the Ferrari event at Daytona late last year a contact of mine was able to confirm with the Mexican owner that he still has the car.

Why would Elon Musk need the money from selling his F1 in 2007 to fund his business ventures? How could the money he received from selling his F1 in 2007 make a real difference to him back then?
You might want to revisit Musk's story in those years when he was working to keep both Tesla and SpaceX viable and was not flush with cash. Sure the ~$2.0-2.5M he got selling the F1 isn't going to launch a rocket, but there are other factors to consider like the reoccurring costs to maintain and insure - and after 8 years of ownership, maybe he just didn't feel the need to keep it any longer. Bad timing for him as in the next few years F1s began appreciating in value at a very rapid pace, but I think he's doing well enough these days he could get himself another one if he cared to.

>8^)
ER
 
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Oh dear, what happened? They only do demos not race them. Glad I got to see it yesterday. Hope it's not badly damaged.
 

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Nick was driving it - I took a photo with him just before he got in the car to take it to the holding area, and saw him on the big screen being interviewed before he set off down the main straight...


I also saw him just after the accident in to the garage where #10R should have ended up and he looked ok, and was even doing an interview just after that.
 

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Sucks for Nick and I always feel a good bit of sympathy to any car owner having a fender bender. That sick gut feeling and all. But watching that makes me marvel for just how good modern racing safety has advanced. A smack that dead on into a wall in the 70's probably meant you were leaving in an ambulance (or worse) and today, he's out on the phone (probably calling mclaren asking for a rehabilitation slot at MSO) seconds later. All in in all, grateful the sport has advanced to make that kind of experience the norm.
 

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But watching that makes me marvel for just how good modern racing safety has advanced. A smack that dead on into a wall in the 70's probably meant you were leaving in an ambulance (or worse)...
20+ years ago is modern?

I agree that it is good but I would hope that things had progressed in the last 20+ years.
 

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If Anywone is insterested ; here are some F1 GTR images. Images all my own. Mostly taken 73rd Goodwood Members Meeting. https://samiaal.kuvat.fi/kuvat/1995-1997+McLaren+F1+GTR/

In Instagram, Samiaal80 where I have added images of these Legends.

The F1 is 25 year Passion to me. These car are more than Life to me. Seems like it some times.....
Hope you like the images.
 

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Official McLaren F1 certification service announced as McLaren Special Operations reveals F1 GTR '25R' restoration at Hampton Court Concours of Elegance

31 Aug 2018

First factory programme to authenticate McLaren F1 supercar now available to owners
New service aims to safeguard originality of iconic car for future generations
Ex-Le Mans F1 GTR ‘25R’ emerges from rebuild by McLaren Special Operations as fully restored, first F1 Certified car
McLaren Automotive, the British manufacturer of luxury, high-performance sportscars and supercars, today introduces a new service to authenticate the heritage of iconic McLaren F1 supercars. The launch of the new programme is coincident with the unveiling of the first F1 to be approved for certification, the renowned ‘25R’ 1997 F1 GTR Longtail. Pristine after a full restoration to ‘as new’ condition by McLaren Special Operations, the last F1 GTR to compete in period is one of the stars of the Hampton Court Concours of Elegance (31 August – 2 September 2018).

“Even among F1 GTRs, this car, designated ‘25R’, is unique – and now it is as near to being new as we can make it,” commented Ansar Ali, Managing Director, McLaren Special Operations (MSO). “The car is the exemplar of everything that the new certification programme stands for and we are proud to have ‘25R’ as the very first McLaren F1 Certified car.”

Announced at Hampton Court with the unveiling of the chassis number 25 car, the F1 Certified programme has been developed to guarantee the authenticity of both road and track versions of the Le Mans-winning supercar, offering ultimate peace of mind for current and future owners. A unique Certificate of Authenticity – which McLaren Automotive is the only body in the world able to issue – authenticates a car’s provenance, originality, service life, road/race history and condition. Conformity with the original specification and to any McLaren-sanctioned upgrades is confirmed by reference to the factory archives.

Along with the certificate, owners receive a bespoke illustrated book documenting the history of their car. In total 106 McLaren F1s were built between 1993-98, among them 64 road cars and 28 GTR race cars, and all are eligible for the scheme.

A veteran of many endurance events in period including the Le Mans 24 Hours, over the past 18 months ‘25R’ has been restored to ‘as new’ condition by McLaren Special Operations. Using original F1 GTR parts held by the factory, the restoration has returned the car to the same specification and livery it had when it ran at Le Mans in the first year it raced.

The top-level circuit career of F1 GTR ‘25R’ spanned eight years and several continents. It was built as one of three Longtail cars for the Gulf-Davidoff team to compete in GT racing in 1997 and driven at Le Mans that year by Ray Bellm, Andrew Gilbert-Scott and Masanori Sekiya. It was forced out two hours from the end of the race when an oil line fractured, causing a fire. Repaired by the factory, ‘25R’ was subsequently sold to a team in Japan where it continued racing until 2005. At the Fuji Speedway that year it became the last F1 GTR ever to compete in a contemporary race series.

After being on static display in a Japanese collection, it was sold to the current owner and brought back to the UK in 2016. The owner’s collection is curated by classic car consultancy Kidston SA, founded by McLaren owner Simon Kidston, also a leading international broker of McLaren F1 cars. Kidston SA entrusted the car to McLaren Special Operations in Woking as, battle-scarred from years of racing, ‘25R’ needed extensive remedial work. Refurbishment became a ground-up restoration to ‘as new’ condition using new, old-stock GTR parts stored at the factory in containers last opened 20 years ago.

The new parts used in ‘25R’ go further than being specific to the 1997 GTR; they are all pre-June 1997 parts, ensuring the car is exactly as it would have been in the run-up to Le Mans that year. This includes the ‘tall’ Le Mans gearing and the blue roof identification lights – taken from an aircraft’s wing, and the only non-McLaren part in the entire car – with which the car was fitted for Le Mans.

With the new body panels displaying the exact Gulf-Davidoff team livery and bearing the car’s 1997 Le Mans number 39, ‘25R’ is a true 21-years-old time-warp machine, as visitors to the Hampton Court Concours of Elegance will witness.

“McLaren cherishes its rich heritage of iconic and world-beating cars such as the F1,” said McLaren Automotive Chief Executive Officer Mike Flewitt. “’25R’ presented us with a unique opportunity to demonstrate this by restoring it to precisely how it was when it raced at Le Mans in 1997, thus ensuring its future. Maintaining the integrity of these historically significant cars is paramount and F1 Certified will play a big role in allowing us to do that for the peace of mind of owners today as well as preserving a wonderful heritage for future generations of car lovers.”

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JALOPNIK
Get Your McLaren F1 Certified To Make Sure It's Not Fake

Justin T. Westbrook

You used to lay awake with hopes of owning a McLaren F1. Then you worked hard and made enough money and you bought one. Congratulations. But now McLaren wants to keep you awake wondering if your McLaren F1 is legitimate.


The good news is you can pay McLaren even more money now to certify your F1. McLaren Special Operations has announced a new certification service to guarantee the authenticity of all of the McLaren F1s that are out there, including both road cars and race cars.

To get a certificate of authenticity, only McLaren Automotive can comb over your car’s background and compare it with company archives, including provenance, service life, condition, race history and originality.

All of this to confirm that you are indeed a very special person for owning a very special McLaren F1, valued at millions and millions of special dollars. I just can’t help but feel like this is just another barrier to convincing owners to actually drive their F1s. For what’s supposedly one of the best engineered driving experiences ever, judging how much it actually gets driven even harsher seems like unfortunate discouragement of a good time.

Jalopnik has reached out to McLaren to ask if the certification service costs owners anything and we’ll let you know if we hear back.


Along with the announcement of the program, McLaren also showed off one of the three McLaren F1 GTR Longtail cars built to compete in GT racing in the late-90s, pictured above. The car also raced in Le Mans, where it caught fire and had to retire. It raced a few more times in Japan after factory repairs in the 2000s.

The car was treated to a full restoration to “like-new” condition, using parts stored by McLaren for the last two decades and painted in the original Gulf-Davidoff team livery it raced with in 1997, and it’s the first F1 to be certified by the new program.

It’s definitely one of the more special cars of the special McLaren F1, but it’s also genuinely nice to see an automaker go through the effort of keeping such a cool thing in good condition. For the kids, or whatever.

https://jalopnik.com/get-your-mclaren-f1-certified-to-make-sure-its-not-fake-1828743388
 

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The attention to detail on that car is stunning. I saw it a couple of times while it was being rebuilt and they have done a fantastic job.
 
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