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Just curious who(other than Leno) has taken delivery in US? Initial Impressions?
Have not taken delivery yet, but was fortunate to have the opportunity to drive my dealer's demo today. So, my second test drive so far and the first time in a production example (my first drive was a production prototype).

Most noticeable change is the SOUND! This car has the Inconel sport exhaust and in real life it's freaking LOUD! :eek: It's very throaty, with some serious bass tones, which is why I think most video camera speakers don't pick up the full spectrum of the sound. But even at idle, it's loud enough that your neighbour is going to be saluting you - either with a thumb up, or the other finger! I certainly don't want it any louder.

Same goes for inside the car. I'm not sure if the sport exhaust was supposed to increase cabin noise, too, but either way I'm pretty sure it does. The PP car I drove last time had the extra sound piped in tweak, too, but it really didn't sound as loud as this car. In all powertrain modes, but especially Track. My dealer rep couldn't shout above the sound in Track, he just had to wait until I was done mashing the throttle. Which wasn't long, as you can imagine there were speed limits to respect. ;)

The 4000 RPM buzz that was in the VR PP car was non-existent in this car, so Simon Andrew must have hunted it down. Actually, I couldn't hear any rattles anywhere - the car just felt solid, like a Porsche.

The shift paddles are definitely easier to pull now, I think even easier than the PP car, although I'm pretty sure that car was still lighter than the original spec. I'm indifferent, as I never saw the point of being able to flick the paddle with my pinkie as an advantage. The controls (brakes, steering, throttle pedal) are all beautifully weighted and in sync. Having paddles that are too light in action would just feel out of place. This time around, I mastered the Pre-Cog function and found it is easiest when both hands are on their respective paddles, as you can easily feel the initial rocker detent that way. Very satisfying to shift using Pre-Cog, as you can truly experience the seamless gearchanges. Will be a phenomenal feature on the track.

The only real negative so far is the ground clearance. Those front air deflectors really do necessitate approaching ramps on an angle. My dealer rep mentioned that Mc is looking into a solution. Would be nice if they can design a part to accomplish the same thing without hanging so low.

The turbos are a drug! I don't know how you UK guys are managing to not get speeding tickets yet (I hope I didn't jinx anyone by saying that :eek:). Even half-throttle accels were like a hit of adrenaline! When I went flat, it was like playing a game of chicken with myself. Then the dealer rep looked at the speedo, then I looked at it. :eek: Time to test the Air Brake! Could literally do that all day and not get bored! :)

Of course people in other cars were freaking out at the sight of the MO demo car. Several taking photos while they were driving - very dangerous, but I'm sure they couldn't help it.
 

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I took delivery a couple of weeks ago, and wrote briefly about my initial impressions in the delivery thread. Not to cross-post, but in summary:

I drove the car 300 miles in the 3 days that I had it before I left for vacation, and from there, business travel. Probably the easiest way to put it is that driving the 12C is intoxicating, and I did not want to stop driving the car. It is so much more drivable than other supercars that I have owned. The handling is extraordinary, and the acceleration is addictive.

It is my belief that after driving this car, anybody who is truly a supercar enthusiast, and who can afford it, will want to buy one. It is just that good.
 

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I took delivery a couple of weeks ago, and wrote briefly about my initial impressions in the delivery thread. Not to cross-post, but in summary:

I drove the car 300 miles in the 3 days that I had it before I left for vacation, and from there, business travel. Probably the easiest way to put it is that driving the 12C is intoxicating, and I did not want to stop driving the car. It is so much more drivable than other supercars that I have owned. The handling is extraordinary, and the acceleration is addictive.

It is my belief that after driving this car, anybody who is truly a supercar enthusiast, and who can afford it, will want to buy one. It is just that good.
Well said,now you know how frustrating it has been for us early adopters when the early reviews came out,trying to tell people they had got it wrong became an uphill struggle,we should see some better reviews from the states this spring
 

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I took delivery a couple of weeks ago, and wrote briefly about my initial impressions in the delivery thread. Not to cross-post, but in summary:

I drove the car 300 miles in the 3 days that I had it before I left for vacation, and from there, business travel. Probably the easiest way to put it is that driving the 12C is intoxicating, and I did not want to stop driving the car. It is so much more drivable than other supercars that I have owned. The handling is extraordinary, and the acceleration is addictive.

It is my belief that after driving this car, anybody who is truly a supercar enthusiast, and who can afford it, will want to buy one. It is just that good.
Marin, 300 miles in three days??? Was your average speed 30 mph ??
 

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Marin, 300 miles in three days??? Was your average speed 30 mph ??
Well, Palo Alto to Marin takes you through San Francisco... Average speed through town of 5mph... take it down to 1mph since people wouldn't stop taking pics of the car... I can see an average speed of 30mph.
 

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Envy. 300 miles more than me
 

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The shift paddles are definitely easier to pull now, I think even easier than the PP car, although I'm pretty sure that car was still lighter than the original spec. I'm indifferent, as I never saw the point of being able to flick the paddle with my pinkie as an advantage.
6E, I am surprised by your comment on this. I got my car a week ago, and my own impression is that the shift paddle feels very similar to the original one, as tested in dunsfold before the press articles. Personally, I would prefer them softer for a better precision of the shift timing, but maybe it's a question of getting used to it.
 

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6E, I am surprised by your comment on this. I got my car a week ago, and my own impression is that the shift paddle feels very similar to the original one, as tested in dunsfold before the press articles. Personally, I would prefer them softer for a better precision of the shift timing, but maybe it's a question of getting used to it.
Hmm. I could be wrong (or my fingers have gotten strong for some bizarre reason!), but the paddles definitely felt lighter to me.

In any case, I think I actually "mastered" the Pre-Cog a few weeks ago while sitting in the dealer demo while it was parked in the showroom. I played around with it for at least 10 minutes. Did you try my suggestion of having both hands on the rocker? That really allows you to move the paddle precisely to the detent and hold it there in advance of the shift. Then it just takes the smallest of pulls to complete the shift and thus I found that I could time it bang on, every time, when I was actually driving the car.

I didn't think I would really be able to tell the difference between a normal and a Pre-Cog shift, but I totally could. The normal shifts are quick, but the Pre-Cog is instant. Uncanny, actually. It really demonstrates the superior technology of the dual clutch system. Hopefully, it will prove reliable and durable in the long run. (Incidentally, I believe that the 458's recent gearbox mapping "upgrade" is actually a work-around for a problem in that transmission's design that has caused failures. Essentially, I think they increased the length of torque interruption in Race mode to have some mercy on the mechanicals, which were/are breaking for some customers. They called this an emotional upgrade - what else? - but to my mind that is the opposite of what the dual clutch system is designed for. A DCT is supposed to have the fastest, and smoothest shift possible, not one that bangs you in the back of your head. I digress...).

I think the weight of the 12C's controls will feel perfect on the track, especially under hard braking and high speed corners, where a more deliberate action is appreciated. But, I can see how others may want a lighter feel on the street.
 

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Hmm. I could be wrong (or my fingers have gotten strong for some bizarre reason!), but the paddles definitely felt lighter to me.

In any case, I think I actually "mastered" the Pre-Cog a few weeks ago while sitting in the dealer demo while it was parked in the showroom. I played around with it for at least 10 minutes. Did you try my suggestion of having both hands on the rocker? That really allows you to move the paddle precisely to the detent and hold it there in advance of the shift. Then it just takes the smallest of pulls to complete the shift and thus I found that I could time it bang on, every time, when I was actually driving the car.

I didn't think I would really be able to tell the difference between a normal and a Pre-Cog shift, but I totally could. The normal shifts are quick, but the Pre-Cog is instant. Uncanny, actually. It really demonstrates the superior technology of the dual clutch system. Hopefully, it will prove reliable and durable in the long run. (Incidentally, I believe that the 458's recent gearbox mapping "upgrade" is actually a work-around for a problem in that transmission's design that has caused failures. Essentially, I think they increased the length of torque interruption in Race mode to have some mercy on the mechanicals, which were/are breaking for some customers. They called this an emotional upgrade - what else? - but to my mind that is the opposite of what the dual clutch system is designed for. A DCT is supposed to have the fastest, and smoothest shift possible, not one that bangs you in the back of your head. I digress...).

I think the weight of the 12C's controls will feel perfect on the track, especially under hard braking and high speed corners, where a more deliberate action is appreciated. But, I can see how others may want a lighter feel on the street.
6e,ive never used a paddleshift before i bought my car,and to me it just seemed natural to have both hands on the paddle at the same time,it just falls right,and works perfectly.As to the weight ,to me it feel lighter than the cars at Dunsfold,but not by much,possible by as little as 10%,but 6 months later its hard to tell with the excitment of the day!!,each to his own and MSO could alter this simply to each owners spec if needed
 

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6E, I am surprised by your comment on this. I got my car a week ago, and my own impression is that the shift paddle feels very similar to the original one, as tested in dunsfold before the press articles. Personally, I would prefer them softer for a better precision of the shift timing, but maybe it's a question of getting used to it.
As a Les Rosbeef I have now driven a number of cars, all production spec, and there is a definite change in the paddle haptic being easier on later cars.

This was confirmed during a conversation with Antony Sherrif who also explained he wanted resistant paddles because people complained that going from a stick shift to paddles reduced inter-activity when driving.

However, I do think it needs some driving time to realise. The brakes have changed a little, gaining more modulation.
 

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OK, let's say my recollection may not be fully reliable. I tried to hold both paddles and I confirm it helps get a better feeling. Anyway, I agree that it will probably not be a problem on a track (at least a fast one) where your hands are always firm at the same place on the wheel, but I will reserve my answer for a very twisty road in the Alps where you need to "work" more with the wheel and might find it convenient to shift gear quickly with one finger between two other movements.
 

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OK, let's say my recollection may not be fully reliable. I tried to hold both paddles and I confirm it helps get a better feeling. Anyway, I agree that it will probably not be a problem on a track (at least a fast one) where your hands are always firm at the same place on the wheel, but I will reserve my answer for a very twisty road in the Alps where you need to "work" more with the wheel and might find it convenient to shift gear quickly with one finger between two other movements.
Fair enough. Please remember to bring an onboard video camera along for that very twisty road in the Alps! (can only dream in this part of the World)
 

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OK, let's say my recollection may not be fully reliable. I tried to hold both paddles and I confirm it helps get a better feeling. Anyway, I agree that it will probably not be a problem on a track (at least a fast one) where your hands are always firm at the same place on the wheel, but I will reserve my answer for a very twisty road in the Alps where you need to "work" more with the wheel and might find it convenient to shift gear quickly with one finger between two other movements.

Owl. I agree holding both paddles gives more control, maybe because they are connected and pivot centrally.

I have planned to take my MP12 to the Alps in June plus the Dolomites for two weeks. Can't wait to do my favourite passes, there are so many. We usually do 5 or 6 a day. Wonder if the lack of fuel stations will be an issue?
 

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Owl. I agree holding both paddles gives more control, maybe because they are connected and pivot centrally.

I have planned to take my MP12 to the Alps in June plus the Dolomites for two weeks. Can't wait to do my favourite passes, there are so many. We usually do 5 or 6 a day. Wonder if the lack of fuel stations will be an issue?
You will need to know your car! The most fuel ive got in mine is 52 ltrs,even though the tank takes 75ltrs and the milage level is down to 20 miles left,i think because you can go down to 7mpg they have been over generous with what you have left in the tank,or the fuel useage computor is not as acurate as we would like it.
Hey Bruce,thats my first complaint also!!!:D
 

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Andy, what is a 'safe' estimate of tank range?

Presumably they are not 'doing a Ferrari' and fitting a smaller tank to save weight?:D
 

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OK, let's say my recollection may not be fully reliable. I tried to hold both paddles and I confirm it helps get a better feeling. Anyway, I agree that it will probably not be a problem on a track (at least a fast one) where your hands are always firm at the same place on the wheel, but I will reserve my answer for a very twisty road in the Alps where you need to "work" more with the wheel and might find it convenient to shift gear quickly with one finger between two other movements.
You can do all of this:

http://www.lateralg.org/roads/orange/malibu15.htm

...and only take your hands off 3/9 once. It's also a bumpy road, and really makes the 12C's suspension shine.
 

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Wow! August, do you have the same in Europe, by any chance ?
I'd guess so - I mean we've all seen Goldfinger, right!? I mean - they didn't do the Stelvio Pass part on a backlot at Universal, did they!?

I just wouldn't know where they are - maybe someone else here can help?

Hey - that's a cool idea. A "room" with threads where we can share great roads in our area - perhaps divided by region?

...just a thought.

There are some amazingly good (and empty) roads in the Malibu, CA area - Decker Canyon, Tuna Canyon, Latigo (as above), Mulholland Highway (west of Kanan Dume; east from Kanan has a lot of traffic - though "thhe snake" is AMAZING).

Latigo Canyon is 11 miles of torturous twisties that people seldom use it as a shortcut between PCH and Mulholland, and it only serves a handful of homes. I hardly ever encounter traffic there.
 
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