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Smitten
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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, I'm in the queue for a car delivery summer next year. Currently driving an Audi RS4. I've had several test drives and a brilliant session at Dunsfold and safe to say that the sheer performance leap to the MP4 is staggering. Launch control left me laughing at the pace, a hot lap with an instructor hugely respectful. After a lifetime reading about supercars and hearing the phrase 'can't be used on the public road', actually experiencing it was humbling, thrilling, sobering, energising, fabulous.

Whilst the RS4 is a fast road car, it's obviously not an out and out sports car, so I'm considering getting something else that will help build my driving experience and reduce some of that gap for when my MP4 arrives (needless to say I'll be taking full advantage of any driver training going in the meantime).

So, suggestions please for a suitable in between vehicle, a performance bridge to the McLaren. Requirements: similar power train/layout, ability to handle reasonably long distance trips (ruling out Caterhams and track day specials), something that will hold value reasonably well over next 8 months.

Audi R8?
 

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Well your last requirement about holding value makes your choice a 2year old R8 that is depreciated or a lotus Evora for learning about handling. Or a chipped Boxster.
 

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Smitten
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Discussion Starter #3
Hmmm, good point on Boxster, slipped my mind that they are mid/rear layout. Cayman S feels more my type though for the hard top. Not sure that the Lotii would hold value terribly well (or spend more time back the dealer).
 

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I test drove the Cayman R with flappy paddles and it was a hoot. Porsche have stopped building Boxsters and Caymans as they have a glut of stock so discounts, in the UK, are sizeable but residuals terrible.......2 year old BoxterS depreciated £20k......hence second hand a bargain and for Cayman
 

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I have an RS4 as well, which I bought because after I drove one, I realized it has one of the best naturally aspirated motors ever made (and certainly ever in a sedan). What a brilliant car. I plan to keep it forever.

My opinion is that your bridge car should be RWD, and therefore not an R8. I would say a 360 Challenge Stradale is the perfect choice, except you have the criteria of long distance trips, which rules that out.

Cayman seems like a reasonable choice, but you'd be acclimatizing to a smaller car (than the 12C in terms of overall dimensions), way down on power (actually, less than your RS4, too) and no turbos. Driving a turbo car rapidly demands a technique of its own, so something to consider.
 

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Evora S. Don't know what kind of money hit it will take. I'd also think a Cayman S (or R)...

Personally - I don't think you really need a bridge car (though if you mean "bridge the gap between now and delivery time with a toy" then I guess you do!).

Or another way of looking at it from the "performance bridge" - the 12C is its own bridge. Just set Handling and Powertrain to "Normal"! ...the car is supremely easy to get along with and very docile when that's what you want.
 

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I cant speak highly enough about the Cayman R (clearly Im biased). Its a blast to drive, capable as a daily driver, and will hold its value, at least in the States, quite well. That said, it is half the power of the 12C.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
...(though if you mean "bridge the gap between now and delivery time with a toy" then I guess you do!).
Pretty much. Just had this thought that I could usefully use this time to really get to grips with a sports cars. My driving history is 205 Gti, Focus ST and now RS4 so I've not spent serious time in RWD yet.

I have an RS4 as well, which I bought because after I drove one, I realized it has one of the best naturally aspirated motors ever made (and certainly ever in a sedan). What a brilliant car. I plan to keep it forever.
Think if I could make the finances work I'd do the same as there's nothing else to touch it for an all round everyday car, particularly in Avant form as mine is. Compact, soulful, adequate power, stirring noise when you want it, stealthy when you don't, load lugging and long distance:).

My opinion is that your bridge car should be RWD, and therefore not an R8. I would say a 360 Challenge Stradale is the perfect choice, except you have the criteria of long distance trips, which rules that out.
Fezzas are off the list as too exotic/flighty/temperamental and haven't heard good stories about customer service/support. My impression is that Porsche's are pretty bomb proof and can stand up to their envelopes being explored on a regular basis. EVO often bang on about how Porsche are one of the few manufacturers of sports cars that can genuinely cope with a track day thrashing followed by the drive home. Anyone got any experiences on reliability etc?

Cayman seems like a reasonable choice, but you'd be acclimatizing to a smaller car (than the 12C in terms of overall dimensions), way down on power (actually, less than your RS4, too) and no turbos. Driving a turbo car rapidly demands a technique of its own, so something to consider.
From the time I've had in 12Cs so far, I haven't noticed any old school turbo lag, delivery is very linear. I'm less concerned about power, and more into getting to grips with handling mid/RWD. Hmm, looks like a visit to local Porsche dealership is on the cards - I suppose every petrolhead should have at least one Porsche in their history somewhere.
 

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Pretty much. Just had this thought that I could usefully use this time to really get to grips with a sports cars. My driving history is 205 Gti, Focus ST and now RS4 so I've not spent serious time in RWD yet.



Think if I could make the finances work I'd do the same as there's nothing else to touch it for an all round everyday car, particularly in Avant form as mine is. Compact, soulful, adequate power, stirring noise when you want it, stealthy when you don't, load lugging and long distance:).



Fezzas are off the list as too exotic/flighty/temperamental and haven't heard good stories about customer service/support. My impression is that Porsche's are pretty bomb proof and can stand up to their envelopes being explored on a regular basis. EVO often bang on about how Porsche are one of the few manufacturers of sports cars that can genuinely cope with a track day thrashing followed by the drive home. Anyone got any experiences on reliability etc?



From the time I've had in 12Cs so far, I haven't noticed any old school turbo lag, delivery is very linear. I'm less concerned about power, and more into getting to grips with handling mid/RWD. Hmm, looks like a visit to local Porsche dealership is on the cards - I suppose every petrolhead should have at least one Porsche in their history somewhere.
Porsches are pretty Bomb proof,never had any problems,even after modding.
 

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In nearly 4 years of Cayman ownership, the only problem I ever had (that didn't involve me crashing into a fence) was a burned out tail light, and the service couldn't have been better. Pull into the service center, guy told me to pop the trunk, replaced the bulb, and off I went in about a minute. Didn't even have to get out of the car.

The cars are as bullet proof as I've ever owned. If the 12C proves to be as reliable, it'll be a truly impeccable car.
 

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By contrast I have a two year old Boxer S that has had two recalls for engineering changes, give me strength, it's been in production for 50 years!

But Porkers are bullet proof, can be thrashed straight out of the box on track all day and rarely let you down.

In fact a 911 will only develop it's potential when it's thrashed as early in life as possible and then ask for more.

That racing lineage must have helped!
 

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a nissan GTR.

Very fast car but still easy to drive
practical for a daily use

effectively R8 could be also a solution, less efficient but more refined
 

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There's no point changing the RS4 for an R8 - Actually the interior build of the RS4 is better and less 'plasticky' than the R8 and the real-world performance is nigh on identical (even though the low slung mid-engined R8 does of course handle better). In many ways I miss my RS4 as it was such a great all-rounder. The more I consider your dilemma the more I think you'd regret selling it as it is the ideal adverse weather / practical mission alternative to your forthcoming 12C, so keep it!

I changed mine for an M3 comp which is quite simply fantastic. Much more fun than the Audi, the only negative is that it is useless in anything other than the lightest of snowy conditions and it has less load carrying capability than the RS4 Avant!

Of course its performance pails into insignificance when compared to the 12C:D
 

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There's no point changing the RS4 for an R8 - Actually the interior build of the RS4 is better and less 'plasticky' than the R8 and the real-world performance is nigh on identical (even though the low slung mid-engined R8 does of course handle better). In many ways I miss my RS4 as it was such a great all-rounder. The more I consider your dilemma the more I think you'd regret selling it as it is the ideal adverse weather / practical mission alternative to your forthcoming 12C, so keep it!

I changed mine for an M3 comp which is quite simply fantastic. Much more fun than the Audi, the only negative is that it is useless in anything other than the lightest of snowy conditions and it has less load carrying capability than the RS4 Avant!

Of course its performance pails into insignificance when compared to the 12C:D
What? R8 has plasticky interior? I just bought one and it has one of the best interiors ever. Better that any other Audi, Maserati, Ferrari, Mercedes or BMW I owned. The chassis is superb and very rear-drive feeling. The car will oversteer big time when provoked and you have to be fast to catch it. Very entertaining. Very agile and very good steering feel. The only complaint i have is that v10 at low revs does not sound anything special. Also, the open gate manual can be a a bit of a pain in fast downshifts from 5/4 and 3/2. On the other hand, it's a dream to heel and toe. Great car all around.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
a nissan GTR. Very fast car but still easy to drive
practical for a daily use
I've driven a few and whilst they are immensely accelerative and have ridiculous levels of grip, fundamentally it's another 4 wheel drive car, which I already have. I'll be getting that sort of acceleration/power with the 12C. On a more boring note, I'm not sure the value would hold terribly well.

There's no point changing the RS4 for an R8 .....The more I consider your dilemma the more I think you'd regret selling it as it is the ideal adverse weather / practical mission alternative to your forthcoming 12C, so keep it!
I did really like the R8 manual change. something very cool about the clack-clack of a gear change, but as you say very similar power to the RS and it's also 4WD. Does look like the case is more and more for a Cayman S. Think the R might be too hardcore and only a slim % extra in outright performance/handling.

Funny, my original plan was to get a nice anonymous Focus ST170 for the daily drive and have the toy tucked away in the garage. Must be a petrolhead to be trying to convince myself to keep an RS4 as a daily driver!
 
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