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It happens very rarely, but if it's persistent I'll just stomp on the gas and it releases. Maybe I shouldn't be doing that...
 

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Guys, like I said, this is normal. I just spoke with Owen, the tech at Lakeside. He said the reason the e-brake kicks back in is because the voltage battery level and other checks have to be performed before letting you go. He said it seems intermittent but it's not, its just that most of you are putting your seat belt on after hitting the R or ebrake release, or closing the door too late. He said the way to bypass this feature is close the door, put seat belt on, then put in reverse and go. I tried this and I don't get the issue.
 
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Guys, like I said, this is normal. I just spoke with Owen, the tech at Lakeside. He said the reason the e-brake kicks back in is because the voltage battery level and other checks have to be performed before letting you go. He said it seems intermittent but it's not, its just that most of you are putting your seat belt on after hitting the R or ebrake release, or closing the door too late. He said the way to bypass this feature is close the door, put seat belt on, then put in reverse and go. I tried this and I don't get the issue.


Yes. This was also confirmed to me by the service manager at McLaren. Frankly take 10 seconds to put on the seatbelt, stow your belongings, take a moment to consider your good fortune and let the car prepare to thrill you while keeping you safe. If you have armed mercenaries attempting to kidnap you just mash the loud pedal while holding down the trans button. Otherwise, what's the rush?

I agree however that in typical McLaren fashion this particular Easter egg should have been explained in the manual. Or at lease in big letters to the service departments.
 

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I have encountered this feature (problem), I am not convinced it is related to time for checks to be done as I have sat there for a while trying to work out what I have done wrong, I am pretty confident it is connected to seatbelt though. Seatbelt on and seems to be fine. I reverse out of garage, seems to be common thread around reversing, never had it going forward. Fun aren't they!
 

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If it's part of the programming, that should be easy enough to test and should be repeatable. Just put seatbelt on first, start the car, and see what happens.
 

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Guys, like I said, this is normal. I just spoke with Owen, the tech at Lakeside. He said the reason the e-brake kicks back in is because the voltage battery level and other checks have to be performed before letting you go. He said it seems intermittent but it's not, its just that most of you are putting your seat belt on after hitting the R or ebrake release, or closing the door too late. He said the way to bypass this feature is close the door, put seat belt on, then put in reverse and go. I tried this and I don't get the issue.
Disagree, it is a glich, not sequence-related built-in protective/safety feature. Mine has done it since new and regardless of what you do, I always get in, put on seatbelt, close door, but it still does it. Just another weird McLaren electronics FU
 

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I've owned 2 12Cs. A coupe, now a spider.

After the first year of ownership, my coupe started doing this. Randomly. Doesn't matter what sequence I did things when I got in the car, or how long I waited before releasing the brake. It was entirely random. And only occurred after the first year of ownership.

Spider never does this.

Same driver, 2 cars, several total years of ownership. The brake not releasing is an electronic gremlin.
 

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I would have to agree with the last couple of posts... I have put on about 7K on my Spider in a year and never had this issue as well. I am leaning towards glitch as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
It's definitely a bug or something. People's habits don't change that much. If your car did it a lot and then your next one never does it at all, it's pretty obvious that there is something up with it. Mine has done it for years and it's completely random and independent of temperature, weather, speed at which you try to disengage it, etc.

It's 99.9% likely to be a bug.



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I talked to another Mac tech named Kevin and he said it's definitely normal and the only reason why you all think it's a bug is because it occurs randomly and later in life. He explained that this is because of the Lithium Ion battery check. As the battery gets older or is exposed to various environments, it takes longer to pass the startup test. Some days it passes immediately, other days it take a few seconds or minutes longer for the test to pass, but it's the one test that changes throughout the life of the car or even on a daily basis. Happens more often on colder days but can occur on hotter days as well. Accept it or not, it's not a bug and has nothing to do with the e-brake itself. In fact, proof of this is that the e-brake does indeed release and then re-arm after attempting to back out. Is it a flawless feature?.. no. But it hasn't ever prevented someone from backing out once it passes the tests.
 

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My e brake continued to re-engage after replacing with a new lithium battery. It also did it when a temporary lead acid battery was installed waiting for the replacement lithium battery to arrive. My spider has never had the problem with a battery that is 3 years old.
 

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Discussion Starter #34 (Edited)
That doesn't really make sense. Why would McLaren implement a feature that re-engages the e-brake to prevent you from driving before it's ready as opposed to just stopping you from switching into D or R in the first place? The logical implementation is that upon start-up, you cannot change it from neutral until the test is cleared. They have a ton of other implementations of things that don't let you press buttons when not appropriate, like changing active modes while the steering wheel isn't straight, so why not just do the same simply thing with this test?

Also consider that you literally could mash the gas pedal way too hard and have it suddenly re-engage the e-brake. I'm pretty sure that it not at all good for the e-brake, the passengers, or the car in general. The reason I even noticed this was not because I was giving it gas and not moving, it's because I was already moving and it jerked to a stop.



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That doesn't really make sense. Why would McLaren implement a feature that re-engages the e-brake to prevent you from driving before it's ready as opposed to just stopping you from switching into D or R in the first place? The logical implementation is that upon start-up, you cannot change it from neutral until the test is cleared. They have a ton of other implementations of things that don't let you press buttons when not appropriate, like changing active modes while the steering wheel isn't straight, so why not just do the same simply thing with this test?

Also consider that you literally could mash the gas pedal way too hard and have it suddenly re-engage the e-brake. I'm pretty sure that it not at all good for the e-brake, the passengers, or the car in general. The reason I even noticed this was not because I was giving it gas and not moving, it's because I was already moving and it jerked to a stop.
I've personally done that.

I have pulled halfway out of the garage only to be yanked to a complete stop by the e-brake. Somehow I doubt that McLaren programmed the car to do this. It's a gremlin.
 

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I talked to another Mac tech named Kevin and he said it's definitely normal and the only reason why you all think it's a bug is because it occurs randomly and later in life. He explained that this is because of the Lithium Ion battery check. As the battery gets older or is exposed to various environments, it takes longer to pass the startup test. Some days it passes immediately, other days it take a few seconds or minutes longer for the test to pass, but it's the one test that changes throughout the life of the car or even on a daily basis. Happens more often on colder days but can occur on hotter days as well. Accept it or not, it's not a bug and has nothing to do with the e-brake itself. In fact, proof of this is that the e-brake does indeed release and then re-arm after attempting to back out. Is it a flawless feature?.. no. But it hasn't ever prevented someone from backing out once it passes the tests.
Dude, read your own post, "it's definitely normal....because it occurs randomly"!
 

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This is consistent with what I was told by Mac BH service. Mine did this for a month or two in late 2014, probably due to cold temps dropping the battery voltage. The good news is that the problem went away, and it hasn't done it since.

OP, when did you last have the car's software updated? I was told they made the battery voltage check easier to "pass" in one of the software updates, because owners were complaining about this hassle.

I talked to another Mac tech named Kevin and he said it's definitely normal and the only reason why you all think it's a bug is because it occurs randomly and later in life. He explained that this is because of the Lithium Ion battery check. As the battery gets older or is exposed to various environments, it takes longer to pass the startup test. Some days it passes immediately, other days it take a few seconds or minutes longer for the test to pass, but it's the one test that changes throughout the life of the car or even on a daily basis. Happens more often on colder days but can occur on hotter days as well. Accept it or not, it's not a bug and has nothing to do with the e-brake itself. In fact, proof of this is that the e-brake does indeed release and then re-arm after attempting to back out. Is it a flawless feature?.. no. But it hasn't ever prevented someone from backing out once it passes the tests.
 

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Dude, read your own post, "it's definitely normal....because it occurs randomly"!
Hey, I didn't say it, McLaren's tech did. Read your post of you reading my post. :)
 
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