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Yes exactly. I'm just pointing out what to NOT use. The ASM system is dangerous when used together with HANS, or better said vice versa.
Ok will check the manufacturer and revert... You'll be pleased to know that there's going to be some method of storage for the shoulder straps. That's what I spent my time on. I guess I got priorities a little wrong !
 

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Wouldn't it be reasonable to modify any car for track use and then go for fastest times? Surely safety equipment would not be seen as disqualifying a car as "production" for the sake of time trials. I admit I am naive in the world of racing.
 

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Wouldn't it be reasonable to modify any car for track use and then go for fastest times? Surely safety equipment would not be seen as disqualifying a car as "production" for the sake of time trials. I admit I am naive in the world of racing.
Guys here are stepping up and placing time money and effort to lower their risk.

Here is a funny little scenario which helps put things in perspective and these hyper cars aren't far off.

An F1 car is made up of 80,000 components - if it were assembled 99.9% correctly it would still start the race with 80 things wrong.

When an F1 driver hits the brakes on his car he experiences retardation or deceleration comparable to a regular car driving through a BRICK wall at 300kmph.

In a street course race like the Monaco Grand Prix - the downforce provides enough suction to lift manhole covers. Before the race all of the manhole covers on the streets have to be welded down to prevent this from happening.
 

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Guys here are stepping up and placing time money and effort to lower their risk.

Here is a funny little scenario which helps put things in perspective and these hyper cars aren't far off.

When an F1 driver hits the brakes on his car he experiences retardation or deceleration comparable to a regular car driving through a BRICK wall at 300kmph!
:rolleyes: there's hyperbole and there's that. A road car no matter how capable like a Veyron SS or a P1 is a long way from being like anything like a formula1 car.

A F1 car can decelerate at the rate of 5-6g, which is far in excess of anything the P1 can do but also it is a very big difference from a road car hitting a brick wall at 300 kmh ie coming to a complete stop.
 

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This is probably a stupid statement, but the vehicles are a completely different breed of machines that have evolved in their own paths.
 

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:rolleyes: there's hyperbole and there's that. A road car no matter how capable like a Veyron SS or a P1 is a long way from being like anything like a formula1 car.

A F1 car can decelerate at the rate of 5-6g, which is far in excess of anything the P1 can do but also it is a very big difference from a road car hitting a brick wall at 300 kmh ie coming to a complete stop.
At 150 mph the P1 is capable of generating 600 kgs of downforce which allows for 2+G cornering speeds. I don't know the braking g's but I am guessing they aren't far off either.

The Piggy Veyron did the ring in 7:40 against the P1 under 7.

Regardless - do me a favor if you are going to respond to my posts.

Spare me of the eyeroll emoticons and hyperbole comments.
 

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...these hyper cars aren't far off.

When an F1 driver hits the brakes on his car he experiences retardation or deceleration comparable to a regular car driving through a BRICK wall at 300kmph.
Is it a big difference or are you just tossing out bs. :)

P1 - braking from 100 km/h to zero takes just 30.2 metres - anything else's that irrelevant please post I can't wait.


1. An F1 car is made up of 80,000 components, if it were assembled 99.9% correctly, it would still start the race with 80 things wrong!2. When an F1 driver hits the brakes on his car he experiences retardation or deceleration comparable to a regular car driving through a BRICK wall at 300kmph!3.
Tossing out BS? well let's see. Instead of simply cutting and pasting some 'facts' from the internet (twice) per your posts, I suggest you re-read what you wrote a bit more carefully and the specific bit I had issue with per bolded bits above.

In simple maths, a P1 brakes from 100 kmh to zero in 30 metres, that's 28 m/s to 0 in say 1.5 seconds. that's ~2g there or abouts which for a road car is phenomenal, but not quite so for a proper race car on slicks. A F1 car can brake at a maximum force of roughly 5-6g. Now the bit in bold which quite frankly I find quite funny. A 300 kmh car hitting a brick wall likely will come to a stop rather quickly. that's ~91m/s to 0m/s in say the length of the car itself ie ~5 metres. This will be achieved in something like 0.1-0.2 seconds for simplicity I have assumed the car losing velocity linearly.That's something like 80g of braking..

Now tell me again how a F1 car at maximum braking is comparable to a car driving through a brick wall at 300 kmh? Or that one of these hypercars is 'not far off' as you put it to something like a F1 car? :rolleyes:
 

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Tossing out BS? well let's see. Instead of simply cutting and pasting some 'facts' from the internet (twice) per your posts, I suggest you re-read what you wrote a bit more carefully and the specific bit I had issue with per bolded bits above.

In simple maths, a P1 brakes from 100 kmh to zero in 30 metres, that's 28 m/s to 0 in say 1.5 seconds. that's ~2g there or abouts which for a road car is phenomenal, but not quite so for a proper race car on slicks. A F1 car can brake at a maximum force of roughly 5-6g. Now the bit in bold which quite frankly I find quite funny. A 300 kmh car hitting a brick wall likely will come to a stop rather quickly. that's ~91m/s to 0m/s in say the length of the car itself ie ~5 metres. This will be achieved in something like 0.1-0.2 seconds for simplicity I have assumed the car losing velocity linearly.That's something like 80g of braking..

Now tell me again how a F1 car at maximum braking is comparable to a car driving through a brick wall at 300 kmh? Or that one of these hypercars is 'not far off' as you put it to something like a F1 car? :rolleyes:
Google the beginners guide to Formula 1 - it was something I read and thought it was worth sharing.

I asked once ... have a good day!
 

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Champ it is interesting reading but it's not completely accurate . The deceleration hitting a brick wall From 300kph is well into the fatal g range mate .
 

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Gentlemen - please don't pollute the debate with too many facts. ;) :D

>8^)
ER
 

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Champ it is interesting reading but it's not completely accurate . The deceleration hitting a brick wall From 300kph is well into the fatal g range mate .
Simply repeating what I read - The beginners guide to Formula 1


1. An F1 car is made up of 80,000 components, if it were assembled 99.9% correctly, it would still start the race with 80 things wrong!2. When an F1 driver hits the brakes on his car he experiences retardation or deceleration comparable to a regular car driving through a BRICK wall at 300kmph!3. An F1 car can go from 0 to 160 kph AND back to 0 in 4 seconds. Yes, that’s right. That’s an acceleration of over 20 m/s².4. An average F1 driver looses about 4kgs of weight after just one race due to the prolonged exposure to high G forces and temperatures for little over an hour.5. At 550kg a F1 car is less than half the weight of a Mini.6. To give you an idea of just how important aerodynamic design and added down force can be, small planes can take off at slower speeds than F1 cars travel on the track.
7. Without aerodynamic down force, high-performance racing cars have sufficient power to produce wheel spin and loss of control at 160 kph. They usually race at over 300 kph

8. In a street course race like the Monaco grand prix, the down force provides enough suction to lift manhole covers. Before the race all of the manhole covers on the streets have to be welded down to prevent this from happening!

9. A dry-weather F1 tyre reaches peak operating performance (best grip) when tread temperature is between 900C and 1200C. That is, 9 times the boiling point of water! At top speed, F1 tyres rotate 50 times a second.Drivers change gears about 2800 times a Grand Prix

And from another search.


The cars used in F1 championships are quite different from usual cars. Just go through these interesting facts on these cars and you will know how different both the versions are.
Approximate 80,000 components come together to make an F1 car. The cars have to be assembled with cent per cent accuracy. If it were assembled 99.9% correctly, it would go on the track with 80 components wrongly placed.
F1 car engines complete their life in about two hours of racing. Just compare this with normal engines which go on serving us faithfully for decent 20 years.
When an F1 driver puts brakes on his car he experiences huge retardation or deceleration. It could be compared to a regular car driving through a brick wall at the speed of 300kmph.
An F1 engine usually revs up to 18000 rpm. This means that the piston travels up and down 300 times a second. Road car engines rev up to 6000 rpm at max.
The brake discs in an F1 car have to withstand the operating temperature of approximately 1000 degrees Centigrade. They are made of carbon fibre which is much harder than steel and has a higher melting point.
The cars have more than a kilometer of cable linked to about 100 sensors and actuators which monitor and control the car.
An F1 car can accelerate from 0 to 160 kph and decelerate back to 0 in just four seconds.
An F1 car weighs around 550 kg.
Gear cogs or ratios are replaced after each race for they have to resist high degrees of stress.
Gear levers are located on the back of the wheel. The clutch levers are located below the gear paddles.
Most racing cars have their tyres filled with nitrogen. The reason being nitrogen has a more consistent pressure compared to normal air.
Road car tyres can last 60 000 to 100 000 km. On the other hand, racing tyres are designed to last only 90 to 120 km.
The tyres lose weight during the race. In a GP each tyre loses about 0.5kg in weight due to wear.
The cars can be refueled at 12 liters per second. The rig used would take just 4 seconds to fill the tank of an average road car.
Pit stop crews take only 3 seconds to refuel and change tyres.

And another

At full speed, it would take a driver just over four seconds to come to a complete stop. The braking power of Formula 1 cars are so heavy that when fully applied at top speed, the force felt by drivers is so great that the only other way to achieve a similar sensation would be to crash your road car into a brick wall. At roughly 300km/h.
 

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Here is my take on the whole P1 vs. 918 vs. LaFerrari and the ring time.

For established brands like Ferrari or Lamborghini, they don't need to post lap times around the Ring to sell cars. Nor do they need to have favorable performance figures to sell cars either. Just take a look at the 12C vs. 458 marketplace here in the US. The 12C is a better performer all around but it depreciates like crazy and the 458 still sells at sticker for a new car (or with a markup for a Spider).

For Porsche, the Ring time is embedded as part of their PR value, so it is no surprise that they would post an official Ring time for the 918. They have posted a ring for every one of their cars and the 918 is no different.

For Mclaren, I was deeply shocked when they chose not to disclose their Ring time. I think this move did not do them any favor with it comes to marketing and brand promoting. Because Mclaren is a NEW brand to the world, they need to promote the crap out of it. When you only have 3 models in your lineup, you need all of the PR material you can get on your hands. This was not a smart move.

No doubt that by NOT having a Ring time posted, it wouldn't really affect the sales of the P1. However, the P1 isn't the bread and butter of this brand is it? Having a really fast Ring time would only help Mclaren sell their P13 and future 12C cars down the line. :(
 

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I think the comparison is to the deceleration initially felt hitting the wall then continuing through the hole. Sudden stop would obviously kill you.
 
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