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The 'XPGT' P1GT is getting close to final spec by the looks of it; P1GTR chassis #033 that was for sale through Mark Donaldson and others has been bought and is the one being the donor vehicle. Check out Lanzante on Instagram [@the_real_lanzante] for some pics and videos
 

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AUTOMOBILE
RM Sotheby’s Headlines New Private Sales Program with McLaren F1
1998 McLaren F1 is one of just two upgraded to LM engine spec by the factory
By: Rory Jurnecka June 15, 2018

RM Sotheby’s is a name that is synonymous with high-end collector car auctions, but the company has announced that it is also breaking into the private sales business, offering unique cars in a direct sales format. The headlining car of this new venture is a 1998 McLaren F1, the famed three-seat supercar known to many as a sort of Ferrari 250 GTO from a more modern era due to the car’s performance, rarity, road/race pedigree, and soaring values.


This particular McLaren F1, chassis #073, is one of just two road-going versions converted to the more potent LM-spec by McLaren Special Operations (LM for Le Mans, which an F1 GTR race version won in 1995). The LM spec boosts power to 680 hp at 7,800 rpm, using genuine GTR parts including cams, pistons and more.

This car was also converted to Extra High Downforce spec, with a larger rear wing, revisions to the nose, and extra front wing vents. A 4 mm Gurney flap is was also a factory addition, along with a color change from the original AMG Green Velvet to Brilliant Orange Metallic.

This car was kept at the McLaren factory in Woking, U.K. by its first owner and was also upgraded to a GT-spec interior with leather and Alcantara upholstery, plus LM-style handbrake and instrument cluster. Needless to say, these upgrades and many more must have cost the owner a pretty penny.

The car’s designer, Gordon Murray, also signed both the owner’s manual and the car’s transmission tunnel. This F1 was always serviced by the factory and the car has just under 6,000 km (approximately 3,700 miles) on its engine since upgrades.


McLaren F1s cost just under $1 million when new in the late 1990s, but demand at the time for such an expensive supercar was not strong, especially when Ferrari’s contemporary F50 supercar rang in at roughly half that amount. Just 106 cars in total were built, with only 64 of those being road versions. This has helped boost prices for what many view as the ultimate “analogue” supercar, with the last version to sell at auction bringing a huge $15,620,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge sale last year. For a price on chassis #073, you’ll likely have to present yourself as a serious buyer to RM Sotheby’s.

Other vehicles currently available under RM Sotheby’s Private Sales division include a 2003 Ferrari Enzo, an Aston Martin DB AR1 Zagato from the same year, and a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680 S with coachwork by Saoutchik.
http://www.automobilemag.com/news/rm-sothebys-headlines-new-private-sales-program-mclaren-f1/
 

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AUTOMOBILE
RM Sotheby’s Headlines New Private Sales Program with McLaren F1
1998 McLaren F1 is one of just two upgraded to LM engine spec by the factory
By: Rory Jurnecka June 15, 2018

RM Sotheby’s is a name that is synonymous with high-end collector car auctions, but the company has announced that it is also breaking into the private sales business, offering unique cars in a direct sales format. The headlining car of this new venture is a 1998 McLaren F1, the famed three-seat supercar known to many as a sort of Ferrari 250 GTO from a more modern era due to the car’s performance, rarity, road/race pedigree, and soaring values.

This particular McLaren F1, chassis #073, is one of just two road-going versions converted to the more potent LM-spec by McLaren Special Operations (LM for Le Mans, which an F1 GTR race version won in 1995). The LM spec boosts power to 680 hp at 7,800 rpm, using genuine GTR parts including cams, pistons and more.

This car was also converted to Extra High Downforce spec, with a larger rear wing, revisions to the nose, and extra front wing vents. A 4 mm Gurney flap is was also a factory addition, along with a color change from the original AMG Green Velvet to Brilliant Orange Metallic.

This car was kept at the McLaren factory in Woking, U.K. by its first owner and was also upgraded to a GT-spec interior with leather and Alcantara upholstery, plus LM-style handbrake and instrument cluster. Needless to say, these upgrades and many more must have cost the owner a pretty penny.

The car’s designer, Gordon Murray, also signed both the owner’s manual and the car’s transmission tunnel. This F1 was always serviced by the factory and the car has just under 6,000 km (approximately 3,700 miles) on its engine since upgrades.


McLaren F1s cost just under $1 million when new in the late 1990s, but demand at the time for such an expensive supercar was not strong, especially when Ferrari’s contemporary F50 supercar rang in at roughly half that amount. Just 106 cars in total were built, with only 64 of those being road versions. This has helped boost prices for what many view as the ultimate “analogue” supercar, with the last version to sell at auction bringing a huge $15,620,000 at Bonhams’ Quail Lodge sale last year. For a price on chassis #073, you’ll likely have to present yourself as a serious buyer to RM Sotheby’s.

Other vehicles currently available under RM Sotheby’s Private Sales division include a 2003 Ferrari Enzo, an Aston Martin DB AR1 Zagato from the same year, and a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680 S with coachwork by Saoutchik.
http://www.automobilemag.com/news/rm-sothebys-headlines-new-private-sales-program-mclaren-f1/
The photos don't do this car justice. In real life it is one of the ugliest F1s I have ever seen, exceeded perhaps only by a blue one with brown interior that was spec'd by the brother of the guy who spec'd this one.

If Sotheby's sell this one for the client, I wonder if, as they do with auctions, they will charge the buyer a commission in addition to the commission that they get from the seller? I am being facetious with that question, but I never quite understood how they get away with charging a "buyer's premium" - working explicitly for the seller, trying to create a febrile atmosphere designed specifically to push up the price, but then charging the person who is directly harmed by their work for the privilege of being harmed, and the more he is harmed the more he is charged. Crazy.
 

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so how many P1s do we have now. P1, XP P1, P1 GTR track, P1 GTR Road, P1 GTR LM, P1 GT and P1 GT.
Makes lambo gallardo looks conservative in comparison. absolute joke unfortunately for the owners of what is still the best of the Hyper Cars
 

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Discussion Starter #9
so how many P1s do we have now. P1, XP P1, P1 GTR track, P1 GTR Road, P1 GTR LM, P1 GT and P1 GT.
Makes lambo gallardo looks conservative in comparison. absolute joke unfortunately for the owners of what is still the best of the Hyper Cars
Bear in mind that McLaren Automotive only officially acknowledges the P1 prototypes (some of them), the P1s and the P1 GTRs.

Lanzante Motorsport, of course, converted the P1 GTR to 'road legal' status (I lay the bait!), created the P1 LM (with no offical help from MA, but the 4.0 engine says they may have helped a tad), and are no working on converting existing cars to P1 GT and P1 GT Longtail specs.

McLaren Automotive's website still makes no mention of Lanzante's models.

My expected total of every P1 of every purpose and variant is 468 units.
 

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Bear in mind that McLaren Automotive only officially acknowledges the P1 prototypes (some of them), the P1s and the P1 GTRs.

Lanzante Motorsport, of course, converted the P1 GTR to 'road legal' status (I lay the bait!), created the P1 LM (with no offical help from MA, but the 4.0 engine says they may have helped a tad), and are no working on converting existing cars to P1 GT and P1 GT Longtail specs.

McLaren Automotive's website still makes no mention of Lanzante's models.

My expected total of every P1 of every purpose and variant is 468 units.
NO official help? really? if you make 6 extra tubs for Lanzante, i think that is pretty explicit official help
 

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Bear in mind that McLaren Automotive only officially acknowledges the P1 prototypes (some of them), the P1s and the P1 GTRs.

Lanzante Motorsport, of course, converted the P1 GTR to 'road legal' status (I lay the bait!), created the P1 LM (with no offical help from MA, but the 4.0 engine says they may have helped a tad), and are no working on converting existing cars to P1 GT and P1 GT Longtail specs.

McLaren Automotive's website still makes no mention of Lanzante's models.

My expected total of every P1 of every purpose and variant is 468 units.
What number do you have for each category, and are you including the portion of prototypes that were not remade into customer cars?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
NO official help? really? if you make 6 extra tubs for Lanzante, i think that is pretty explicit official help
I am not inclined to disagree. The provision of the tubs and engines speak volumes.

What number do you have for each category, and are you including the portion of prototypes that were not remade into customer cars?
As you'd expect, it is somewhat complex and I can't be fully explicit on some elements.

Each has caveats:

Up to 29 chassis for 'Prototypes' (not all have been accounted for, yet - this is based on chassis numbers, etc)
At least 375 chassis for customers (potentially 376)
59/60 chassis for GTRs (I include XP1 LM here, there is one unaccounted-for car)
5 chassis for LMs
 

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I am not inclined to disagree. The provision of the tubs and engines speak volumes.



As you'd expect, it is somewhat complex and I can't be fully explicit on some elements.

Each has caveats:

Up to 29 chassis for 'Prototypes' (not all have been accounted for, yet - this is based on chassis numbers, etc)
At least 375 chassis for customers (potentially 376)
59/60 chassis for GTRs (I include XP1 LM here, there is one unaccounted-for car)
5 chassis for LMs
I was told by someone at MSO that they had made 25 prototypes on top of the 375 official road cars, and ultimately turned 15 of those into customer cars.
Also, I thought that A West stated that they made 63 GTRs. No?
I thought that the "LMs" were taken from existing GTRs.
:confused:
 

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I was told by someone at MSO that they had made 25 prototypes on top of the 375 official road cars, and ultimately turned 15 of those into customer cars.
Also, I thought that A West stated that they made 63 GTRs. No?
I thought that the "LMs" were taken from existing GTRs.
:confused:
I know of two prototypes that were converted to GTR, Then one of them converted to road legal GTR.
 

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I know of two prototypes that were converted to GTR, Then one of them converted to road legal GTR.
Two P1 prototypes, or two P1 GTR prototypes?
Whichever, they may have been included in Mr West's number for GTRs produced.


All I know is that they made a lot more than what they promised would be the maximum!!!
 

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MclarenF1P1LM-a-holic
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NO official help? really? if you make 6 extra tubs for Lanzante, i think that is pretty explicit official help
The 'Lanzante' GTR tubs were already counted in the 'official' list before the 6 were passed to Lanzante - there weren't any extras made for the LM's.

The road going GTR's were made from existing track-GTR's

The P1 GT's and longtail GTR's are being made from existing chassis
 
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