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The glowing articles for this one gloss over the fact that neither the paint or interior are original to the car. It also used to wear the High Downforce Kit which a previous owner chose to remove.

Early ownership history is dodgy with the first owner purchasing the car with embezzled funds from his company, McGraw Hill, where he served as an accountant. He also owned an F1 GTR and had a race team that was active in the British GT series until his bubble burst and he was arrested.

The next owners were a pair here in the USA who imported the car without proper certifications and then tried to sell the car in violation of the terms it was imported under. This caused them to be arrested as well and the car was seized pending forfeiture by US Customs for a period of nearly five years while they were tried. This gives partial explanation for the low mileage.

This article and others make mention of MSO maintaining the car at all times, but that's not accurate either. After returning to the UK following its legal entanglement here in the USA it was serviced by specialist Lanzante Motorsports for several years who look after most of the F1 GTRs and a couple of other F1 road cars. I wouldn't discount their work at all as they have a long history with the cars, but lets be factual at least.

It's not really a buyer beware situation, but a buyer unaware is never a good thing I don't think.

>8^)
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So is this now owned by MSO and if so how did it end up back in McLaren ownership?

If they are selling it on behalf of someone else is it known who or is that not to be disclosed?
 

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This F1 is privately owned.

MSO (formerly McLaren Customer Care) have always offered their own internal brokerage service for the McLaren F1s and may just be choosing to remind people of that fact with this round of viral marketing.

>8^)
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Press release:

McLaren F1 chassis #069 – one of the very last produced – offered for sale with less than 2,800 miles covered from new
Original down to the correct numbered McLaren F1 book and limited edition owner’s watch presented on delivery
Maintained and presented by McLaren Special Operations Heritage division
The McLaren F1 is regarded by many as the car which rewrote the supercar rule book. With only 64 roadcar examples built between 1993 and 1998, the original McLaren F1 is one of the rarest and highly-regarded models among collectors, enthusiasts and petrolheads. McLaren Special Operations (MSO) continues to maintain and manage McLaren F1s globally, and is offering one of last ever and finest examples of this highly-regarded model for sale. McLaren F1 chassis #069 is in factory condition, having covered less than 2,800 miles since new.

During 1998, only six examples of the original McLaren F1 were completed, and chassis #069 was the 60th model overall to be hand-built in Woking, England. It is presented in Carbon Black complimented by subtle detailing throughout, including a stealth finish to the 17-inch centre-locking magnesium wheels. The central driving seat is finished in black and contrasting red leather, with the dual passenger seats upholstered in Alcantara®.

McLaren F1 chassis #069 is UK registered with all UK taxes paid and offered for sale exclusively through McLaren Special Operations Heritage division with fitted luggage, complete Facom titanium lightweight tool kit and Facom tool box, all books and literature, including the correct numbered LM Edition of the ’Driving Ambition’ McLaren F1 book and limited edition McLaren F1 owner’s watch.

THE McLAREN F1 – A TRUE ICON

Designed by Gordon Murray and Peter Stevens, the McLaren F1 was developed and designed with a no compromise approach, world-beating Formula 1 expertise and technology, and the most driver-focused driving experience at its core. A true pioneering tour de force, the McLaren F1 was the first road car to feature a full carbon fibre chassis, and with a central driving position, engine bay lined with gold and famed McLaren obsession for technical excellence, is considered a true modern-day automotive icon. Powered by a bespoke naturally-aspirated mid-mounted 6.1-litre V12 engine producing 636PS (627bhp), it broke the record for fastest production roadcar with a top speed of 390.7km/h (242.8 mph) and, more than 20 years on, still holds the title of fastest naturally-aspirated production road car ever built.

McLAREN SPECIAL OPERATIONS

McLaren Special Operations grew out of the McLaren Customer Care programme, which dates back more than 20 years to the days of the McLaren F1 road car. The team looked after servicing and maintaining McLaren F1s for owners the world over. It also undertook personalisation when cars changed hands: new owners often wanted to put their own marks on their vehicles. Today, MSO continues to service, maintain and offer brokerage services for all examples of the McLaren F1.

Please contact [email protected] for further details and enquiries about McLaren F1 #069.
 

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Original down to the correct numbered McLaren F1 book and limited edition owner’s watch presented on delivery
Disappointingly inaccurate statement in the press release.

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What's the asking price??? I guess if you have to ask.... you can't afford it! Haha... Will be interesting to know what it sells for.
Thats what i am wondering. I mean if a car that was totaled twice with more then 40,000 miles can sell for 11million euros who knows what this will go for.
 

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Thats what i am wondering. I mean if a car that was totaled twice with more then 40,000 miles can sell for 11million euros who knows what this will go for.
The market may have moved on since Atkinson sold his car, but I don't think that, side-by-side, this car #069 is intrinsically worth any more than his.

A car that's been driven (by someone who knows how to drive) an average of about 2,000 mi/yr for 20 years and been regularly serviced by the factory is going to be in better condition than a car that has sat idle in warehouses for most of its life and driven, when it was driven, by people who were clueless.

One appreciates that "the market" normally imposes an inverse relationship between mileage and value but, as in many other things, in doing that people are valuing illusion over reality.
 

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The car has a price tag in the region of what you would expect to see a top price 'LM' go for, looks like the current owner is trying to push the market for these on a bit :eek:
 

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The car has a price tag in the region of what you would expect to see a top price 'LM' go for, looks like the current owner is trying to push the market for these on a bit :eek:
:confused:

I would expect the asking price for an LM these days to be IRO $25m.

He can't be asking anything like that amount for #069. It is nowhere near being a special car (relative to other standard F1s).
 

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The last McLaren F1 LM changed hands for a reported $19M price tag in 2013. At that point you could still purchase a standard road car for about half that price. The market has obviously moved on a bit since then, but that LM purchase represented an extremely rare opportunity and the price paid reflected that.

Before anyone offers up different information, the F1 that was sold in RM's Pinnacle Portfolio auction last August in Monterey was (despite clever marketing efforts) not an F1 LM. Rather it was a road car fitted with several upgrades, including an LM-spec engine. It brought $13.75M with buyer's premium.

It wouldn't surprise me if the ask on #069 is $15M or higher today. It seems to be a very complete car and if originality is not important to the buyer, it is also a good purchase opportunity.

Personally I would prefer the car with the High Downforce Kit it used to wear as that seemed more appropriately paired with the LM-spec interior.



>8^)
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The last McLaren F1 LM changed hands for a reported $19M price tag in 2013. At that point you could still purchase a standard road car for about half that price. The market has obviously moved on a bit since then, but that LM purchase represented an extremely rare opportunity and the price paid reflected that.

Before anyone offers up different information, the F1 that was sold in RM's Pinnacle Portfolio auction last August in Monterey was (despite clever marketing efforts) not an F1 LM. Rather it was a road car fitted with several upgrades, including an LM-spec engine. It brought $13.75M with buyer's premium.

It wouldn't surprise me if the ask on #069 is $15M or higher today. It seems to be a very complete car and if originality is not important to the buyer, it is also a good purchase opportunity.

Personally I would prefer the car with the High Downforce Kit it used to wear as that seemed more appropriately paired with the LM-spec interior.

>8^)
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I'd agree with that. By today's standards, $19m seems light for an LM. You point out that that was 3 years ago.
For a couple of other reference points, a couple of years ago the owner of one of the F1 GT road cars, which as far as I am concerned are by far the least desirable version of the F1, turned down a bid of $20m for his car.
Last year two F1 GTRs were sold each for about $22m. It is hard to believe that any GTR apart of course from the Le Mans winner is worth that much, but it is what it is.
An LM has got to be worth more than either a GT or a GTR.

You mention an "LM-spec interior". I am curious as to what that means in this car. To protect LM owners, MSO will not precisely replicate an LM interior or exterior. What did they do to this car?
 

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"LM-spec" is a term we've use to describe the sectioned block padding on the passenger seats like you would have in an F1 LM, instead of the fully upholstered versions you will typically find in the standard road car. Here's a sampling of the interior in chassis 069 showing what I mean:



I'm only aware of one other road car that has received this treatment - chassis 014, now white, with the High Downforce Kit fitted - and in that case the owner also specified the bare carbon driver seat shell with limited sections of padding, identical to that on the F1 LM. Additionally on this car an LM-spec gear knob and LM-spec parking brake handle were also fitted. The door panels are still fully trimmed - something you would not find in an actual F1 LM and a number of other details still preserve the uniqueness of the LM's interior.



We also use the term "GT-spec" to refer to F1 road cars refitted with the interior treatment first seen on the longtail road cars, the F1 GT. These seats have a similar style to Ferrari's popular "Daytona" seats. Quite a number of cars have had this upgrade done, including both XP3 & XP4. Here's a sample of it from chassis 073:



On the other topics you mention it should not come as too much of a surprise that certain GTRs now seem to be commanding higher prices - as one owner explained long ago about LM valuations, it makes little sense that a car built to commemorate the efforts of the racing cars should be worth more than the ones which actually raced.

Given that all the GTRs are now eligible for road conversion and historic racing events are starting to command their presence it really shouldn't come as a surprise where values are headed. Looking at other blue chip collector cars, the ones with actual racing history are typically valued much higher than those without.

I've not had the opportunity to even see an F1 LM yet, but an owner did afford me the chance to ride in the F1 GTR that finished 5th overall at Le Mans in 1995 - a truly crowning achievement in a legendary event - and it remains one of my greatest memories with these cars. I realize the F1 LM was the one we all had the poster of on the wall, but owning a GTR with that kind of history is pretty precious and his masquerades as an LM with orange paint so most wouldn't know the difference anyway.

With that GT I'd heard a rather different story - McLaren were having difficulty finding any buyer at the price level its owner was expecting. An offer of $20M certainly should have been enough to sway him. While the GT is the rarest original variant of the F1 it has never been widely regarded as appealing to most. The longtail modifications certainly allowed the F1 GTR to remain competitive that final year, but stiffer competition from Porsche and then Mercedes Benz limited their success.

In the case of the road going example you've referred to I think most collectors would be put off paying top dollar for it considering the original chassis was destroyed in a fire sometime after 2005 and McLaren spent more than 2 years rebuilding the car from scratch, or fairly close to it as I understand. I do like the final result - I think the finished product looks far better in version two, but full disclosure of the car's history is going to further limit its appeal.

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On the other topics you mention it should not come as too much of a surprise that certain GTRs now seem to be commanding higher prices - as one owner explained long ago about LM valuations, it makes little sense that a car built to commemorate the efforts of the racing cars should be worth more than the ones which actually raced.

Given that all the GTRs are now eligible for road conversion and historic racing events are starting to command their presence it really shouldn't come as a surprise where values are headed. Looking at other blue chip collector cars, the ones with actual racing history are typically valued much higher than those without.

I've not had the opportunity to even see an F1 LM yet, but an owner did afford me the chance to ride in the F1 GTR that finished 5th overall at Le Mans in 1995 - a truly crowning achievement in a legendary event - and it remains one of my greatest memories with these cars. I realize the F1 LM was the one we all had the poster of on the wall, but owning a GTR with that kind of history is pretty precious and his masquerades as an LM with orange paint so most wouldn't know the difference anyway.


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The market is whatever it is; at the moment F1 GTRs are valued more highly than F1 road cars are. For the first 15 years the road cars were valued more highly. I couldn't say which will be more valuable in future.

Although I have no opinion on future market value, I'd have to disagree with you on the inherent value of an F1 GTR v an F1 road car.

True, most GTRs have been made road-legal. That does not, however, make them road cars in the sense that a 250 SWB or 250 GTO is a genuine road car.

An F1 GTR makes a pretty horrible road car. The noise from the straight-cut gears is deafening (literally). There is no air-conditioning and the windows don't open, making the cockpit a slow-burning oven. The turning circle is huge. One of the road car's two passenger seats is sacrificed for the wiring loom. The storage lockers are filled with equipment, precluding any storage. The lack of a fuel gauge and, IIRC, speedometer does not enhance practicality. It is a wonderful car to drive for brief periods, and it is a road-legal car, but it is not a usable road car.

Leaving to one side the GTR's qualities as a road car, however, my main objection is to the deification of the GTR as a racing car.

I am as glad as any person on this forum that an F1 GTR won Le Mans in '95. What a fantastic result. We must however put that into context:

The only reason that an F1 won was that the sponsor of the fastest car, Mario Andretti's Courage, insisted that the car pit - quite unnecessarily - in the late stages of the race in order for the pit crew to wipe grime off the sponsor's logos, to make them visible. Without that act of unbelievable idiocy, the F1 would have finished second.

Also, if it had not rained for many hours, no F1 would have even finished the race; their gearboxes would have failed (as indeed some did anyhow).

One must acknowledge that, during the mid-'90s, sports car racing had reached its absolute nadir. There was no FIA sports car championship at all from 1994-96, '95 and '96 being the two years in which the F1 GTR won the "world championship" of sports car racing.

The championship it won was the BPR Global Series (as in, "What was that again?") Unlike the situation for several decades before, and for the two decades since, during that brief interlude in the mid-90s there were no factory entries at Le Mans or on the endurance racing circuit.

Instead, the F1 GTRs were competing against F40s and XJ 220s that had been designed 7 years earlier. At Le Mans in 1995 there were the modest Courage and Kremer outfits, but nothing remotely like a proper manufacturer entry. It was one of the weakest Le Mans fields ever. To give an indication of the lack of competition at Le Mans in 1995, a little NSX with 340 BHP finished 8th overall. (In 2015 at Le Mans, the 8th place finisher was a Toyota factory entry in the LMP1 class.)

There will always be a special place in racing history for any car that won Le Mans. But how should we think about the next-highest-finishing F1 GTR, the Harrods car that finished 3rd?

There have been 83 runnings of the Le Mans 24. In them, 166 cars have finished either first or second, that is to say in a better position than the Harrods car, and of course another 82 with an equal position. So having a racing car that has a Le Mans palmares that is inferior to that of 166 other cars and equaled by another 82 cars does not strike me as something extraordinary. It's better than nothing, but should it add millions of dollars or pounds to the value of a car? I think that is a real stretch.

And what of the other F1 GTRs, whose claim to fame might be having won or got a podium in a round of the BPR Global series? Again, that is better than nothing, but not a whole lot better than nothing.

Were any of the F1 GTRs driven by any of the all-time greats, a mid-90s equivalent to Fangio, Clark, or Senna, drivers whose mere association with a specific chassis number will attract buyers who want to sit where the great man once plied his trade? With no disrespect to Derek Bell, Ralf Schumacher, Jacques Laffite or Steve Soper, I'd say no. The closest one could come is probably Nelson Piquet. How much of a premium should one pay to own a car that was driven by Nelson Piquet 5 years after he had retired from Formula One?

Indeed, for the most part the GTRs were driven by wealthy amateurs. That would not add to value.

Then starting in '97 the factories returned to endurance racing and, in short order, Porsche, Mercedes and BMW made the F1 GTRs obsolete. The manufacturers came with purpose-built racing cars which certainly should have been quicker than a road car that had been bastardised into a racing car, and they were.

The F1 GTR once got a great racing result in a big race against an unusually weak field. My point is that that great result did not make it a great racing car.

In sum, with the F1 GTR, someone took a great road car, made it into a less-than-great racing car of which one car got one great result, and then someone else tried to turn it back into a road car without remedying the numerous compromises that had been necessary to make it a racing car.

I am being too harsh about the F1 GTR. Its history is something of which the people involved should be proud. My objection however is to justification of its present market value. I fail to see how said road-car-into-racing-car-back-into-road-car should be worth $10m more than the original, pure, great road car.
 

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This F1 is privately owned.

MSO (formerly McLaren Customer Care) have always offered their own internal brokerage service for the McLaren F1s and may just be choosing to remind people of that fact with this round of viral marketing.

>8^)
ER

Of the F1's owned by McLaren which one of the six would you say would be the one most likely they would sell if offered a price? Mansour is not giving his up anytime soon.
 
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