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Not sure if they coined the term it but Koenigsegg made the first megacar (lol) with the Koenigsegg One:1 according to them. Marketing is creative like you were saying. Soon some marketing guy will come up with naming their product an "Ultra" car.

The 1,360 PS power output is the equivalent of one megawatt, which Koenigsegg claims make the One:1 the 'world's first megacar'
think it was more marketing bc of the 1 megawatt thing otherwise it’s not really a commonly used classification …

for Hypercars at least some common things are:

they are all exotic sports cars, they have very high power output and topspeed, they are tech wise more advanced than more common cars, they have mostly exotic doors (918 and Bugattis don’t have), they are quiet expensive (at least 2-3x the price of cars below them from same manufacturer), they are NOT body variations of existing cars, basically all use a cf chassis… that’s about it
 

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Reliable hypercar definition is not that hard:

  • must be a supercar to begin with (so no 4 doors, 4 seats, hatchbacks, etc)
  • limited production
  • significantly higher price than supercars
  • at least one performance aspect where it's significantly better than supercars

With that said, this is not my definition of a hypercar, but rather my interpretation and standardization of what other people most commonly call and understand as hypercars. Lately, some cars that meet the first three criteria, but not the fourth, have also started to be called hypercars, so the last criterion might be a bit weaker than the rest.

If we were going by the strict definition, then neither the SP1, 2 or 3 would be hypercars and the Sian and Countach LP800 wouldn't be either. But, it is a grey area at the moment and while the supercar definition is pretty solid, there aren't really enough hypercars for the hypercar definition to be as clear cut or for there to be a need to further divide the hypercar definition into different categories.
 

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Reliable hypercar definition is not that hard:

  • must be a supercar to begin with (so no 4 doors, 4 seats, hatchbacks, etc)
  • limited production
  • significantly higher price than supercars
  • at least one performance aspect where it's significantly better than supercars

With that said, this is not my definition of a hypercar, but rather my interpretation and standardization of what other people most commonly call and understand as hypercars. Lately, some cars that meet the first three criteria, but not the fourth, have also started to be called hypercars, so the last criterion might be a bit weaker than the rest.

If we were going by the strict definition,then neither the SP1, 2 or 3 would be hypercars and the Sian and Countach LP800 wouldn't be either. But, it is a grey area at the moment and while the supercar definition is pretty solid, there aren't really enough hypercars for the hypercar definition to be as clear cut or for there to be a need to further divide the hypercar definition into different categories.
then neither the SP1, 2 or 3 would be hypercars and the Sian and Countach LP800

They are all no Hypercars by common definition … Senna is but mostly bc of its stellar performance, SF90 could be but is not due to price … it’s really not that clear anymore
 
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I looked up how McLaren classifies the Solus GT; for McLaren, this is a "hyper-exclusive track car".
There seems to be no limit to the creativity around the term hyper... 😉
Or it seems to be clear that a hypercar "per definition" must have street legal approval.

It began as an audacious, extreme concept sketch. Solus GT then launched into the hot competition of the gaming world with Gran Turismo SPORT in 2017, where it raced to virtual victories. It was from these totally uncompromising roots that the hyper-exclusive track car was born. Untainted by rules or regulations. Straight from the world of imagination to raw, tactile reality.
Solus GT
 

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I feel like time has diminished what “hypercar” actually means. I could be wrong, but I feel like when the 918, P1, and LaFerrari came out, the price and performance difference between a supercar (12C, Gallardo, etc…) was much more pronounced. Now, with cars like the 765LT and SF90 being so good, the lines have blurred and defining a “hypercar” is much more difficult.
 

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I feel like time has diminished what “hypercar” actually means. I could be wrong, but I feel like when the 918, P1, and LaFerrari came out, the price and performance difference between a supercar (12C, Gallardo, etc…) was much more pronounced. Now, with cars like the 765LT and SF90 being so good, the lines have blurred and defining a “hypercar” is much more difficult.
The 765LT and the SF90 for sure make it harder to clearly say that some other cars - like the Daytona SP3 which very likely isn't faster either in straight line or at the track - are hypercars, but I think it's pretty clear that they themselves are not hypecars, even though they have "hypercar-like" performance. They are not limited production (ok, the 765LT is, but is based on the 720S which is not) and they are not significantly more expensive than other supercars (significantly should be at least 2x more than the most expensive of supercars). The SF90 is often mentioned as being right on the supercar/hypercar line, but I think that's mostly because it has "1000hp" and there currently aren't any close competitors. However, as soon as the Aventador replacement arrives - likely with 1000hp+ and matching performance and price - I think this class of car will be safely regarded as only at the high end of supercars. Hypercars, by their very nature, need to be something that's removed from the standard system where there are direct competitors with similar performance offered at similar prices. You can't be able to just buy one whenever you want to as if you were picking up a bag of chips from the shelf at the supermarket.
 

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The 765LT and the SF90 for sure make it harder to clearly say that some other cars - like the Daytona SP3 which very likely isn't faster either in straight line or at the track - are hypercars, but I think it's pretty clear that they themselves are not hypecars, even though they have "hypercar-like" performance. They are not limited production (ok, the 765LT is, but is based on the 720S which is not) and they are not significantly more expensive than other supercars (significantly should be at least 2x more than the most expensive of supercars). The SF90 is often mentioned as being right on the supercar/hypercar line, but I think that's mostly because it has "1000hp" and there currently aren't any close competitors. However, as soon as the Aventador replacement arrives - likely with 1000hp+ and matching performance and price - I think this class of car will be safely regarded as only at the high end of supercars. Hypercars, by their very nature, need to be something that's removed from the standard system where there are direct competitors with similar performance offered at similar prices. You can't be able to just buy one whenever you want to as if you were picking up a bag of chips from the shelf at the supermarket.
I agree 100% with the exclusivity aspect of a hypercar. Very limited production, not available to the general public, very selective ownership.
 

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I feel like time has diminished what “hypercar” actually means. I could be wrong, but I feel like when the 918, P1, and LaFerrari came out, the price and performance difference between a supercar (12C, Gallardo, etc…) was much more pronounced. Now, with cars like the 765LT and SF90 being so good, the lines have blurred and defining a “hypercar” is much more difficult.
yes exactly
 

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Didn't know where to put it so placed it here 🙂


"Ferrari 499P revealed as 2023 Le Mans Hypercar contender!

A year since Ferrari announced its commitment to the program, it’s finally revealed the new 499P Le Mans Hypercar racer in full.

After months of teasers and strenuous rounds of initial testing, Ferrari has given us our first look at its new Le Mans Hypercar contender, the 499P. Launched as the marque’s first top-flight endurance racer since 1973, it will go head-to-head with the likes of Toyota Gazoo Racing, Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus and Peugeot when it makes its race debut at the 1000 Miles of Sebring in 2023.

The LMh-class 499P is built upon a completely bespoke carbonfibre monocoque, with its hybrid powertrain also unique. Powering the front axle is a single electric motor capable of delivering a peak of 268bhp, drawing power from a 900V battery pack developed using technology derived from its hybrid Formula 1 cars.

Ferrari revealed that it considered the use of V12 and V8 power plants at the project’s inception, but the need to keep weight as low as possible, it settled on a bespoke 120-degree 3-litre twin-turbocharged V6 (499 being the displacement of each cylinder). As per the regulations it produces a maximum of 671bhp, and although it shares architecture with the V6 from the 296 GT3, it doesn’t share any specific parts.

Both the combustion engine and electric motor produce the maximum output allowed under LMh regulations, but to ensure LMh and LMDh cars are competitive with one another, those peak outputs are constantly adjusted to ensure the 499P’s combined output doesn’t exceed 671bhp (500KW)."

Etc.




 

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I must say that I am quite curious where Ferrari aim to take their next hypercar. Is it gonna be a V12, V8, V6 even? Is it gonna be RWD or AWD? How streetable is it gonna be? Ferrari are quite good at keeping the cards close to their chest and right now it could still go anywhere.

The AWD hybrid architecture with the engine in the middle powering rear wheels and electric motors powering front wheels makes, in my opinion, the most sense for a hybrid supercar/hypercar. You get good 0-60, 1/4 mile numbers because of superior traction (and generally a car that is able to handle all 1000hp+ it will certainly have) and you can get the most out of your brake regen. However, in Ferrari's case, they already have that with the SF90. And with the upcoming SF90 VS I don't think there would be large enough gap between the two cars for the price and exclusivity difference to be justifiable.

That said, it might be justifiable if instead of the TT V8 it gets a V12. The problem with that, however, is that the V12 is quite big and heavy, making the packaging and cooling a real challenge. That's one of the reasons why the LaFerrari ended up weighing almost 1600kg. They had to make the car unnecessarily big - and that's even without front electric motors. The question also is, would doing yet another hybrid V12 hypercar, a second one in a row, be special enough?

Yet another possibility, with the LMH car now being revealed, is that their next hypercar will use a TT V6! At first sight this might not make much sense - after all, the prestige of a model has long been determined by the number of cylinders, especially in Ferrari-land - but it would make sense if their next hypercar was a lot more track focused than previous models - more akin to the AM Valkyrie.

While contrary to the PR statements that the next hypercar will see "a technology transfer from LMH and F1" there will be pretty much no technology or parts sharing of any kind, one thing that might get shared is the engine. For the LMH car Ferrari took their 2.9L TT V6 they are also using in the 296 GTB and, apart from tuning it, made it fully structural. This is pretty much a requirement for a race car, but now with Ferrari having the structural block for the engine, would they use it for their hypercar? On it's own a TT V6 wouldn't be regarded as being prestigious enough, but if it was to be seen as a racing engine coming straight from the LMH, and the whole car was positioned as a race car for the road, that might just work.

The only problem with that strategy, really, is that on the whole Ferrari has been moving away from the more extreme models. The F50 and the Enzo were loud, hot and very raw. The LaFerrari, on the other hand was much more usable and streetable. Having the engine be fully structural - same as on the Valkyrie - has a lot of disadvantages when it comes to noise, comfort and vibrations. So if they were gonna use the engine, going the "race car for the road" route would be the only option - and then the comparison to the Valkyrie would be inevitable. The thing is, regardless of how watered down the Valkyrie spec got, it would still require a huge amount of effort (and money) trying to beat it around a track and the resulting car wouldn't be any more usable than the Valkyrie is. So I have some doubts that Ferrari would choose to go that way.

So what do I think they'll ultimately do? Honestly, despite priding myself on often being able to guess correctly, I have no clue! 😄
 

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I must say that I am quite curious where Ferrari aim to take their next hypercar. Is it gonna be a V12, V8, V6 even? Is it gonna be RWD or AWD? How streetable is it gonna be? Ferrari are quite good at keeping the cards close to their chest and right now it could still go anywhere.

The AWD hybrid architecture with the engine in the middle powering rear wheels and electric motors powering front wheels makes, in my opinion, the most sense for a hybrid supercar/hypercar. You get good 0-60, 1/4 mile numbers because of superior traction (and generally a car that is able to handle all 1000hp+ it will certainly have) and you can get the most out of your brake regen. However, in Ferrari's case, they already have that with the SF90. And with the upcoming SF90 VS I don't think there would be large enough gap between the two cars for the price and exclusivity difference to be justifiable.

That said, it might be justifiable if instead of the TT V8 it gets a V12. The problem with that, however, is that the V12 is quite big and heavy, making the packaging and cooling a real challenge. That's one of the reasons why the LaFerrari ended up weighing almost 1600kg. They had to make the car unnecessarily big - and that's even without front electric motors. The question also is, would doing yet another hybrid V12 hypercar, a second one in a row, be special enough?

Yet another possibility, with the LMH car now being revealed, is that their next hypercar will use a TT V6! At first sight this might not make much sense - after all, the prestige of a model has long been determined by the number of cylinders, especially in Ferrari-land - but it would make sense if their next hypercar was a lot more track focused than previous models - more akin to the AM Valkyrie.

While contrary to the PR statements that the next hypercar will see "a technology transfer from LMH and F1" there will be pretty much no technology or parts sharing of any kind, one thing that might get shared is the engine. For the LMH car Ferrari took their 2.9L TT V6 they are also using in the 296 GTB and, apart from tuning it, made it fully structural. This is pretty much a requirement for a race car, but now with Ferrari having the structural block for the engine, would they use it for their hypercar? On it's own a TT V6 wouldn't be regarded as being prestigious enough, but if it was to be seen as a racing engine coming straight from the LMH, and the whole car was positioned as a race car for the road, that might just work.

The only problem with that strategy, really, is that on the whole Ferrari has been moving away from the more extreme models. The F50 and the Enzo were loud, hot and very raw. The LaFerrari, on the other hand was much more usable and streetable. Having the engine be fully structural - same as on the Valkyrie - has a lot of disadvantages when it comes to noise, comfort and vibrations. So if they were gonna use the engine, going the "race car for the road" route would be the only option - and then the comparison to the Valkyrie would be inevitable. The thing is, regardless of how watered down the Valkyrie spec got, it would still require a huge amount of effort (and money) trying to beat it around a track and the resulting car wouldn't be any more usable than the Valkyrie is. So I have some doubts that Ferrari would choose to go that way.

So what do I think they'll ultimately do? Honestly, despite priding myself on often being able to guess correctly, I have no clue! 😄
Ferrari accordingly to the Ferrari boards during on of those buisness conference calls confirmed it wasn't going to be the V12.🤔
 

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No, absolutely not to compete. But they there's nothing stopping the LAF replacement being based on it either.
well but that on the other hand would make it unusable for 95% of the ppl who want to buy it as they want a street car and not a LMP1 road conversion ;-)
 

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very little hyper about it, besides 3 seats, price and production run.
speed is what 5mph faster than a 30 year old car from the same brand, when everyone else can go 20,30,50mph quicker as a top speed. same goes for acceleration, and you would have to be a brave person taking that around a track.
 

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very little hyper about it, besides 3 seats, price and production run.
speed is what 5mph faster than a 30 year old car from the same brand, when everyone else can go 20,30,50mph quicker as a top speed. same goes for acceleration, and you would have to be a brave person taking that around a track.
I still don’t get what they wanted to make with that car … Philip and the other guys (you know the story I guess ) first idea about a F1 v2 was way more Mclaren and way more fitting than the 3 seater luxury bus without trunk space ;)
 
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I still don’t get what they wanted to make with that car … Philip and the other guys (you know the story I guess ) first idea about a F1 v2 was way more Mclaren and way more fitting than the 3 seater luxury bus without trunk space ;)
what should have happened was a proper collaboration between gordon and Mclaren. the T50 should have been a mclaren...
somehow the t50 has a more exciting and Larger engine, weighs a lot less, is significantly smaller AND has a lot of luggage space.
but hey the Speedtail has cameras for sidemirrors that arent very helpful, a wireless charging system that besides weighing 100kgs is more or less impossible to use, an interior attached to the tub with velcrostrips that come lose with any contact, oh and a petrol/gastank that gives you a range of around 200miles... it really is a brilliant GT concept.
 

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very little hyper about it, besides 3 seats, price and production run.
speed is what 5mph faster than a 30 year old car from the same brand, when everyone else can go 20,30,50mph quicker as a top speed. same goes for acceleration, and you would have to be a brave person taking that around a track.
So, it's a hypercar then. By, your definition. So we agree.

And also the top speed is actually limited to 250MPH and it's aerodynamics are peerless. McLaren never released certain numbers. Drag co efficiency etc. It's possible to atleast work them out.

Chris's Harris described the experience of driving one versus the experience in a Bugatti Chiron in Top Gear years ago. The numbers back this up. Club versus knife or something along those lines.

It's top speed is minimally plus+ 20MPH higher and no hypercar are driven at those speeds anyway. By anyone.

And there's no need to take a GT on the track. Some of the owners I'm positive will have McLaren Senna's too. And it's production records top dog currently.

Anyway if Bugatti Chiron levels of acceleration nearly isn't quick enough then I don't know what it is.

And a central location seater on top? Game set and match.🙂

There's no hybrid like it, for me individually. Because it doesn't exist.
 

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So, it's a hypercar then. By, your definition. So we agree.

And also the top speed is actually limited to 250MPH and it's aerodynamics are peerless. McLaren never released certain numbers. Drag co efficiency etc. It's possible to atleast work them out.

Chris's Harris described the experience of driving one versus the experience in a Bugatti Chiron in Top Gear years ago. The numbers back this up. Club versus knife or something along those lines.

It's top speed is minimally plus+ 20MPH higher and no hypercar are driven at those speeds anyway. By anyone.

And there's no need to take a GT on the track. Some of the owners I'm positive will have McLaren Senna's too. And it's production records top dog currently.

Anyway if Bugatti Chiron levels of acceleration nearly isn't quick enough then I don't know what it is.

And a central location seater on top? Game set and match.🙂

There's no hybrid like it, for me individually. Because it doesn't exist.
what should have happened was a proper collaboration between gordon and Mclaren. the T50 should have been a mclaren...
somehow the t50 has a more exciting and Larger engine, weighs a lot less, is significantly smaller AND has a lot of luggage space.
but hey the Speedtail has cameras for sidemirrors that arent very helpful, a wireless charging system that besides weighing 100kgs is more or less impossible to use, an interior attached to the tub with velcrostrips that come lose with any contact, oh and a petrol/gastank that gives you a range of around 200miles... it really is a brilliant GT concept.
Yes I know … that’s why most are just for sale or already sold … my dealer alone had 3 for resale … I can remember when you talked about yours and how the thing is basically impossible to use as a streetcar … eg. Parking is near impossible, paying at a highway toll station impossible when you are alone in the car … tracking it well also not really a good idea … it’s really more or less just a showpiece for collectors and occasional display at meetings
 
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So, it's a hypercar then. By, your definition. So we agree.

And also the top speed is actually limited to 250MPH and it's aerodynamics are peerless. McLaren never released certain numbers. Drag co efficiency etc. It's possible to atleast work them out.

Chris's Harris described the experience of driving one versus the experience in a Bugatti Chiron in Top Gear years ago. The numbers back this up. Club versus knife or something along those lines.

It's top speed is minimally plus+ 20MPH higher and no hypercar are driven at those speeds anyway. By anyone.

And there's no need to take a GT on the track. Some of the owners I'm positive will have McLaren Senna's too. And it's production records top dog currently.

Anyway if Bugatti Chiron levels of acceleration nearly isn't quick enough then I don't know what it is.

And a central location seater on top? Game set and match.🙂

There's no hybrid like it, for me individually. Because it doesn't exist.
really, you need to read that again. Doing a limited run of a car that doesnt excel in anything doesnt make it a hypercar. And with all due respect, you are obviously entitled to your opinion but i have no idea what you are basing your views on. I clearly have no idea what i am talking about, having owned a Speedtail and found it severely lacking, and still own a P1 and Senna and some others.
Do you think its top speed is limited because mclaren decided that 251 was enough, or because the car would be unsafe above that? tyres, suspension, lack of downforce etc etc. i have a bridge to sell in brooklyn if you believe the first..
Chris makes a tv show that needs to sound appealing, i'll leave it at that.
 
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