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Mark Antar Design
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The One:1 is named after its ambition to be the first assembly-line vehicle to truly achieve a one-to-one ratio of weight and horsepower. If successfully produced, it will weigh 1,400 kilograms and put out 1,400 horsepower, a quantum leap over the 965 horsepower of the base-model Agera.

“Other cars have achieved this but by measuring dry weight -- no oil, no water, no fuel,” von Koenigsegg says.

His number will take into account all the necessary fluids and even the driver. Computer simulations project that the One:1 will be the fastest Koenigsegg yet, capable of 450 kph or more. If the computers are correct, it will also be the fastest car in the world from zero to 200, from zero to 300 and from zero to 400. Engineers expect the last number to be around 20 seconds. To put that in perspective, it takes the Bugatti Veyron 45 seconds to achieve 400 kph. Von Koenigsegg expects to have a prototype by the end of the year.

Land-Speed Record
Prospective buyers should note that the strictly limited production of six has been presold and that there’s already plenty of pent-up demand should any of those lucky few fall through. The price isn’t yet public, but von Koenigsegg says it’s “substantially higher” than that of the Agera S.

Even so, he admits, the company will almost certainly lose money on the project -- which he says doesn’t concern him. Building a hypercar that sets new land-speed and acceleration records will only burnish Koenigsegg’s credentials, and future Koenigsegg cars will likely benefit from the trickle-down R&D originating with the One:1.

Von Koenigsegg toggles through a series of renderings, admiring his imminent creation from various angles.

“No one needs a car like this,” he says, twisting his mouth into a smile. “They just need to want one.”
Find the full interview with Christian von Koenigsegg here.
 

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Boxer what was the egg like to drive. What model did you own? Could you use the car everyday if you wanted to.
He had a CCX.
 

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I drove a ccxr on the runway they use. Was lightening quick no two ways .. Also just weaving down the runway felt extremely well planted but I don't think I could ever spend that amount of money on a car developed without real racing pedigree.
 

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Dread man , truly dread
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I drove Agera and met KVK . He was a nice , enthusiastic gent .
Unfortunately "my" Agera was impressive only in speed . Felt faster than P1 and 918
 

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i love these cars and the Agera R is a very technical car, CVK is a clever bloke and lots of trick details in the car and the paint finish with 5 coats of lacquer is sublime.

A good video of drag racing a Veyron from a roll on and a few times the Veyron gets ahead but the Agera catches and outbrakes it, thats what 1200HP and around 1400KG can do. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yejlC91e2rs
 

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MmmmcLaren
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"... zero to 400 ..." Really? :rolleyes:

You can drive it over a bridge I can sell you.
Rather curious, George (so to speak... :D) what's unbelievable to you: 400kmh/248mph or 20s to achieve it?
 

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2012 MP4-12C
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These guys are really putting in some advance tech...

http://jalopnik.com/the-koenigsegg-one-1-is-swedens-280-mph-carbon-fiber-h-1532088783

See, the One:1 was designed based on customer requests for an insane track car that could also be run on the road. Koenigsegg is doing this by having the suspension, GPS, and a cell phone app all work together. This is a connected car, but in a very different way from a Google car ...
But how they'll be doing it precisely is with GPS. In order to have an optimal setup for each corner, engineers will adjust the car for sections of a track which they will then log into the GPS. When the car reaches those coordinates again, it'll automatically adjust. One:1 also uses the cell phone as kind of a data logger. So instead of staring at a G-meter on track and crashing, it logs the data and sends it to the One:1 app on your phone. That way you have everything after your run...
 

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Reminds me of the old ultra high tech DTM cars. They used to do that corner by corner active setup and even had a movable ballast to adjust CofG mid corner.

I saw the Egg 1:1 at Goodwood FOS. Just as bonkers up close, the construction is out of this world.
 

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2012 MP4-12C
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Reminds me of the old ultra high tech DTM cars. They used to do that corner by corner active setup and even had a movable ballast to adjust CofG mid corner.

I saw the Egg 1:1 at Goodwood FOS. Just as bonkers up close, the construction is out of this world.
What I wonder is will we ever get 2500lb (or dare to dream 1800lb) cars ever again with power like in the 12C. Even with these exotic materials, there seems to be a wall around 3000lbs.

I do think they could save an easy 50-100 lbs if they just used a Nexus or iPad for all infotainment, HVAC, and option controls. The 12C has a FAT console thickness that's not needed. The P1 is much thinner, but still way too much gunk, all of which could be replaced by an ultra thin bezel and a single super lightweight tablet.

I wonder how many other "not invented here" weight penalties are in modern cars?

I know the normal rationale for this stuff is "well, we vet these units to higher standards" and I'm not buying this bullocks "space shuttle" rationale. I'd put any top of the line tablet up against the Parrot system, and the capabilities and reliability are so far ahead, that it just comes off as bunk.
 

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I know the normal rationale for this stuff is "well, we vet these units to higher standards" and I'm not buying this bullocks "space shuttle" rationale. I'd put any top of the line tablet up against the Parrot system, and the capabilities and reliability are so far ahead, that it just comes off as bunk.
It's easy to feel that way, but it's just not true. The automotive environment is significantly more awful than the environment for which consumer tablets are designed.

Take just one component of a modern tablet: the capacitive touch sensor. It works by looking for tiny electrical signals caused by fingers on its surface. Those signals are so small that every time one of the car's other electrical devices turns on or off, the power-supply noise that's generated will fool the sensor into thinking a finger's touching it. Radio-frequency interference from the electric pumps and motors (and from nearby circuitry) will do the same.

Meanwhile, rapid temperature changes -- as from the car's heater or AC, or even from direct sunlight suddenly shining on the touch sensor -- will cause very large electrical changes on the sensor, which can temporarily blind it to the presence of real fingers.

And moisture can condense on the surface of the sensor, making it appear that the whole surface is being touched. Drivers sometimes wear gloves, which makes the capacitive signals from their fingers even tinier. Etc., etc.

And on top of that, the automotive temperature range is huge. Park your car in the desert during the summer and the temperature in the cockpit can easily climb to over 100C. Lots of people live where the ambient temperature sometimes drops to -20C in the winter.

Every electronic component in the tablet has to be rated for automotive temperatures. And the tablet's mechanical components -- the adhesives that hold it together, the plastic case itself -- also have to withstand multiple cycles to those temperature extremes.

All in all, it's really difficult to qualify an electronic device for use in a car. I agree with you that modern Android or iOS tablets provide a much better user experience than the Iris or Parrot systems -- and for many owners, a custom tablet installation might work fine as a replacement for the factory system -- but a car manufacturer absolutely could not put an off-the-shelf tablet into a vehicle.
 
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