McLaren Life banner
1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since there's a deep well of track experience here, what type of lid do you all recommend, and where should I buy it?
 

·
Registered
2020 Explorer ST, 2018 Merc, in search of money for a 12C...
Joined
·
175 Posts
I always recommend full face, but I think that stems from my years racing motorcycles. Although broken glass with an open face helmet might not end well.

Not sure if your org requires SNELL SA2020 or if you can use SA2015, but if you can use SA2015 go with one of these for sure:


 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,877 Posts
Although I personally prefer open-face because I can see and breathe better, every single factory, professional driver I have ever raced with has used full-face. As far as they are concerned, it's not even debatable. If you use open-face with some kind of eye protection (e.g. Oakleys), that will help to mitigate your risk, although obviously you wouldn't want to be hit in the mouth with a chunk of flying metal.

What in my opinion is more important is that, if possible, you use a HANS-type device with either style helmet (assuming you would be using fixed shoulder harnesses rather than road-style inertial reel).

The importance of the HANS-type device is that, as you get older, your arteries lose their elasticity, and that includes the carotid arteries bringing huge volumes of blood to your brain. If your shoulders are fixed in position and your head is pitched forward with a lot of g, the carotid arteries may not stretch but instead will snap, and you will very quickly bleed to death internally. The HANS device limits how far your head is pitched forward, restraining it from hitting the steering wheel or A-pillar, and also limits how far your neck and arteries are stretched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Interesting. I happen to know, due to a recent medical incident, that my arteries are particularly elastic for my age. The neurologist says this is probably why I'm still alive. Anyway, I'm not planning to install a harness, and I'm not going to the track to set the fastest possible lap time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,877 Posts
Interesting. I happen to know, due to a recent medical incident, that my arteries are particularly elastic for my age. The neurologist says this is probably why I'm still alive. Anyway, I'm not planning to install a harness, and I'm not going to the track to set the fastest possible lap time.
You car has airbags?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
helmet rules are simple. buy the best one out there price be damned. no replacin yo noggin!!!
Full face arai for me .
with the speeds cars now carry,there is no room for open faced jobs.
Price isn't a consideration, I'm thinking about visibility and head mobility. I still wear an open face in freefall because I like the wind in my face.
 

·
Owner
Joined
·
896 Posts
Full face and the best you can afford. I have always used full face whether I'm in an open cockpit Indycar or enclosed cockpit car like our Maccas.
 

·
Registered
2020 Explorer ST, 2018 Merc, in search of money for a 12C...
Joined
·
175 Posts
helmet rules are simple. buy the best one out there price be damned. no replacin yo noggin!!!
Full face arai for me .
with the speeds cars now carry,there is no room for open faced jobs.
I'm with you but I have a Shoei head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Good question. Helmet fit can be a HUGE issue. My head is strangely longer front to rear and I usually need the largest hat size. I've tried on Shoei and Bell and others but find that Simpson has the most comfortable fit for me.

I've been much happier with the visibility and comfort of open face for autocrossing and relatively low speed track events (say, 120 MPH at Streets of Willow or Chuckwalla), but now that I'm driving a faster car on faster tracks I'm planning on going back to full face. Going to COTA in November with Pure McLaren, where speeds should be 150+, so going to upgrade before then...

As for "buy the best you can afford", I don't think that necessarily makes sense. As long as you go with a Snell SA2020 certified helmet, and the helmet fits right, the protection should be substantially the same at all price ranges, so why spend $2,000 for a helmet when $500 will work fine? Of course, there are other helmet features that may matter to you, such as built in HANS support, and communications equipment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
Good question. Helmet fit can be a HUGE issue. My head is strangely longer front to rear and I usually need the largest hat size. I've tried on Shoei and Bell and others but find that Simpson has the most comfortable fit for me.

I've been much happier with the visibility and comfort of open face for autocrossing and relatively low speed track events (say, 120 MPH at Streets of Willow or Chuckwalla), but now that I'm driving a faster car on faster tracks I'm planning on going back to full face. Going to COTA in November with Pure McLaren, where speeds should be 150+, so going to upgrade before then...

As for "buy the best you can afford", I don't think that necessarily makes sense. As long as you go with a Snell SA2020 certified helmet, and the helmet fits right, the protection should be substantially the same at all price ranges, so why spend $2,000 for a helmet when $500 will work fine? Of course, there are other helmet features that may matter to you, such as built in HANS support, and communications equipment.
because plenty helmets meet snell,but the well known brand ( usually pricier ones but not necessarily)
are more likely to exceed. and unless you don't put much value on your grey matter then conveying this is moot anyway.
ride motorcycles and assimilation will be symbiotic..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
because plenty helmets meet snell,but the well known brand ( usually pricier ones but not necessarily)
are more likely to exceed. and unless you don't put much value on your grey matter then conveying this is moot anyway.
I respect your opinion, but what science is this based on? Is there a higher scientific standard than Snell SA2020 that your helmet has been tested to?
 

·
2012 MP4-12C
Joined
·
8,522 Posts
I find helmets annoying in the sense that they have a year rating and yorue supposed to basically dump them after 5-7 years and get a new one.

At Monticello they had a ton and you could borrow them. I just borrowed whatever they hand out, and that way I dont have to keep up with whatever standard de jour the helmet world is on.

They have lots of granprix drivers teaching there too, they were fine with the open face ones. Then again, Monitecllo has like no traffic. Nevertheless, I've seen people flip there at crazy speed, so stuff does happen.

I think if youre getting one for yourself first and foremost TRY THEM ON. The variation in comfort is huge. And if something is not comfy and distracting, thats super bad. Also, if you feel no difference in comfort between the full and closed, obviously, get the closed.

Also, almost everyone I know keeps the visor open on track because the heat and moisture is miserable. The practicality is something that's important to consider because you end up not using the tech, then what's the point.

That said, it also depends on how you track. If you're a 10/10ths type, then go full on. When I go to the track these days, im like 6 or 7ths. I enjoy myself way more, and shockingly I get faster the more chill I am.

As always, YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,310 Posts
I respect your opinion, but what science is this based on? Is there a higher scientific standard than Snell SA2020 that your helmet has been tested to?
no science as it is impossible to prove anything once the helmet has been involved in a crash,it then becomes anecdotal at that point.,but a quick read of the snell standards will answer a lot of your questions and some manufacturers will have the sought after info with carefully chosen verbiage such as exceeds or surpasses instead of just meets.
 

·
Registered
2020 Explorer ST, 2018 Merc, in search of money for a 12C...
Joined
·
175 Posts
For what it's worth, I have been racing motorcycles/cars in some form since 1981, and helmets for motocross/supercross/superbikes are much more important than in cars, so here is my 2 cents.

1. SNELL really isn't that exacting as a standard. ECE requirements and testing are much better, but since that cert only applies to Europe, you don't see many here in the US.

2. The cost difference between a $300 SNELL helmet and a $1,500 SNELL helmet usually has to do with other features/design elements, as well as construction. Yes, some helmets far exceed SNELL requirements.

3. Having crashed many times, you can absolutely scientifically prove how the helmet helped protect your head after a crash. I was sponsored by HJC, and I crashed once at over 150mph down at Road Atlanta. I was able to get up and walk away, but HJC wanted my helmet so they could study it. They cut it in half, examined it, and it was on display for a while at their HQ, and then at one of my other sponsor's shops.

4. Yes, helmets have a life span. But having to spend $1,000 every 5 years breaks down to $0.53 per day to save your head, so it is a very good investment.

All in all, do what you feel is best. Even though you might not be out there trying to set lap records, other people might be, and a lot of the accidents/crqshes I have had were caused by other riders/drivers. A good helmet is always worth it.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top