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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m anxiously awaiting emcl to start the 2023 F1 thread, lol.
😀
Looking forward to 2023 we might assume that Mercedes will have its act together. Also I’m wondering how things will work out for Red Bull F1 with Mintzlaff being ”in charge” of all Red Bull sports. The Marko to Dietrich connection no longer in place …

Marko yet to meet with new Red Bull CEO
Previously, the way Red Bull’s founder and figurehead Dietrich Mateschitz communicated with the team was simple - via the similarly-aged 79-year-old Austrian and former F1 driver Dr Helmut Marko.
Mark Mateschitz (son) has decided that he will not run Red Bull directly, but instead hand the operations of the energy drink to three CEOs - with with Oliver Mintzlaff (age 47) in charge of sports.
"As suggested by my father and me and as desired and supported by our Thai partners, a board of directors will manage Red Bull’s business," Mateschitz said last week
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DAILY EXPRESS
Red Bull key man admits he could 'quit overnight' after 'fulfilling role'
Red Bull dominated the 2022 season after securing the Drivers' and Constructors' titles.
By LUKE CHILLINGSWORTH Mon, Nov 21, 2022
Red Bull chief Helmut Marko has admitted he could leave the team as he has “fulfilled his task”. Marko revealed it “wouldn’t be an issue” to walk away and suggested he could change his mind with a day’s notice.
Speaking to Laola 1, he explained: “I fulfilled my task because of my connection to Dietrich Mateschitz, a visionary who understood everything in the big picture. If the atmosphere doesn't suit me anymore, then it won't be an issue for me anymore.
“I can get off from today to tomorrow." It could be a blow to Red Bull who have relied on Marko’s experience to bring through their most talented drivers to date.
Marko’s role as head of the junior drivers' programme has helped promote Sebastian Vettel and Max Verstappen to the team. Between the two, the pair have secured two world titles and 73 of the team’s 92 victories.
 

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Max already talking about life after F1, Helmut hedging with the new owners. The dynasty is crumbling before it even really takes off. I love it.

Predictions for next year? I’m picking Lewis and Mercedes.


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I can’t see them losing the marbles over the next 4 years If Newey stays put, but after that???

I also do thing Mercedes would be darn close in 2023 (I do hope so anyway). Would it be too late for LH to bag that 8ths? Russel is not a Bottas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
THE RACE
PIASTRI’S McLAREN F1 BOW: WHAT WE LEARNED AND WHAT COMES NEXT

By Scott Mitchell-Malm and Josh Suttill
The most talked about driver outside of the 2022 Formula 1 grid finally made his long-awaited official debut with McLaren in the post-season Abu Dhabi test.

Oscar Piastri was at the centre of a contract dispute that occupied the majority of oxygen during F1’s summer break and things got ugly at times – including Alpine team boss Otmar Szafnauer questioning Piastri’s “integrity” and the dispute going to the F1 Contract Recognition Board.

But all involved parties became keen to move on when it became clear there was nothing to stop Piastri from racing with McLaren in 2023.
Piastri was able to officially start his new life with McLaren in the Abu Dhabi post-season test, but his ‘fresh start’ had already begun with a test in McLaren’s 2021 car at Paul Ricard prior to the final two races of the 2022 season.

That 2021 car test was completed with McLaren’s TPC team so the Abu Dhabi running was Piastri’s first opportunity to work with McLaren’s race mechanics and engineers at the track.

Piastri completed 123 laps on Tuesday and clocked the 14th-fastest time, which was over half a second faster than the best set by his team-mate Lando Norris.
“That’s one of the keys of today,” Piastri said when The Race asked him about the importance of integrating with the race team.
“In terms of laptimes, it’s meaningless because you never know what everyone else is doing. That’s not the first port of call for the day, [it’s] getting to know my engineers, my mechanics, everyone in the team.
“There’s a lot of new names to learn, that’s up there with one of the most important things today especially getting into good communications with my engineers in the team in particular.

“Learning how we get feedback and what we want to adjust, getting to learn each other. That’s 100% what today is about.”

Piastri officially became a McLaren driver on the Monday after the Abu Dhabi GP and is now totally free to work with his 2023 employer.
He will get his “official introduction” at McLaren’s factory next week, then begin a simulator work programme and continue developing relationships with his team – and could also make further outings in the team’s 2021 car.
Piastri’s effective ‘early’ release from Alpine provides him with a headstart to life at McLaren, rather than a January 1 start date that has sometimes been the norm in F1.

“Driving the car today was the most positive thing and you obviously can’t substitute anything for track time,” Piastri said.

“So I think having today especially was really important, a really positive thing to have.
“And then working on the peripherals I guess and getting to know my engineers better and everyone in the team better, and if there are a few things that I want to change for next year, I can talk to people about that.

“I’m quite looking forward to being able to design some of my own little things if I want to, all of that kind of background stuff that doesn’t necessarily get seen, that’s all stuff I can work on in the next six weeks.”

As Daniel Ricciardo’s replacement, Piastri will be hoping he can adapt to the characteristics of McLaren’s F1 car that Ricciardo never gelled with.
“It’s difficult to say if it’s a McLaren characteristic or a 2022 [regulations] characteristic so I don’t know whether to put it in a McLaren characteristic basket,” Piastri said when asked if he felt the unique traits of the McLaren.

“There are maybe a few small things that are a bit different but again, it’s only my first day and I’m still well and truly getting up to speed.

“I think I learned a lot today but there’s still a lot to learn. It’s still too early to make that kind of
[judgement].”

Tuesday offered Piastri his first opportunity to observe more closely the way Norris – the team’s clear leader for the last two years – drives the McLaren.
“I definitely was able to have a look at how he drives the car, he’s made it work well this year so that was nice to have that first reference of how Lando drives the car,” he explained.

“Seeing what he does differently and the same in some places. Was good to have that reference.”
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
😀 Daniel Ricciardo will not be leaving F1 at the end of the season after agreeing a deal to become third driver for his former team Red Bull. But why are they getting the band back together?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Mattia Binotto is leaving his position as Ferrari Formula 1 team boss and managing director of the company’s sporting division, according to reports in Italy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
On his way to securing his second world championship Max Verstappen put together one of the most dominant seasons in Formula 1 history. Red Bull's flying Dutchman was in brilliant form all year as he became just the 11th driver to win back-to-back world titles. But what do the numbers say about his performance in 2022?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
MOTORSPORT.COM
How Ferrari quietly sorted its core F1 engine reliability problem

Ferrari’s fluctuating form in the final races of the Formula 1 season – especially from struggles in Mexico to fighting Red Bull in Abu Dhabi – highlighted how critical engine performance was.
By:Franco Nugnes
Co-author:Jonathan Noble
Nov 28, 2022
There were two factors at play here: the first that the setup of its power unit, and especially its turbo size, was not ideal for the high-altitude races in Mexico and Brazil.

But beyond that was the confirmation from Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto after the final race that the Maranello squad had had to wind back engine performance in the latter stages of the year because of reliability concerns.

Some spectacular and costly engine failures earlier in the campaign – including Charles Leclerc’s blow-ups in Spain and Baku, plus Carlos Sainz’s fiery exit in Austria – had prompted the need to turn things down a bit while a solution was put in place.
In a short reference, Binotto said: “We had to slightly lower the power. Yes, we had to do it.”

But it has since emerged that Ferrari was able to go aggressive again in Abu Dhabi with its 066/7 engine with the team believing it had found the solution to those earlier reliability problems.

According to sources, the weak element in the power unit had been singled out as the spark plug within the pre-chamber.

This was the latest evolution of the TJI (Turbulent Jet Ignition) combustion system that Mahle had made available to Ferrari in 2016, and which had allowed the team to close the power gap to Mercedes.

In the six years since, enormous strides were made in the development of a system that has been optimised for the latest generation of power units that were homologated to be frozen until the end of the 2025 season.

The TJI system includes the spark plug and the fuel injector. Both are housed in a well in the cylinder head, and both elements work together to help maximise power.
Only 2-3% of the fuel is injected into the pre-combustion chamber, the rest spreads over the piston surface. The mixture inside the “cap” is particularly rich, while the combustion agent in the chamber is leaner, with more air than fuel.
The ignition of the spark plug reacts with the very rich mixture in the pre-chamber, and causes the creation of plasma jets through open holes in the cap. Thanks to a very high pressure, the lean mixture is self-ignited in several points of the chamber with a flame spread that extends to the entire volume of the cylinder.

The system makes it possible to shorten combustion times, which delivers two advantages.

First the very lean mixture in the chamber means the harmful effects of detonations are reduced, meaning you can increase the compression ratio for more performance.

Plus, with teams still limited as to how much fuel can be used in a race (currently 110kg), for the same amount of fuel injected, greater thermal efficiency is obtained - which also equates to more power.

Ferrari pushed development to exploit the maximum pressure of the injection system, which reaches 500 bar as allowed by the regulations, and aimed for five discharges for each engine cycle.

But the extreme concept led to increased internal temperature, which caused the spark plug to suffer and eventually break.

The engineers, therefore, had to tweak their mapping to not push the spark plug over the limit, while an external supplier worked on delivering new materials to ensure that the component could cope with the needs of the engine in maximum power mode.

Ferrari’s performance in Abu Dhabi suggests that the spark plug problem seems to have been solved, which will be a big boost to Ferrari’s hopes for 2023 where it knows it cannot afford a repeat of its reliability woes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Think would have been better for Binotto to have kept his position in Engineering rather than take on (push for) the promotion to F1 Team Principal … :confused: edit on the other hand he must have been complicit in the fuel consumption scandal …
 
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