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Discussion Starter · #523 · (Edited)
Hamilton's back pain could put Canada in jeopardy
12 June 2022 - 20:44 BY REUTERS
Lewis Hamilton experienced severe back pain during the Azerbaijan GP.
Lewis Hamilton experienced severe back pain during the Azerbaijan GP. Image: Clive Rose/Getty Images

Mercedes fear Lewis Hamilton might not be fit to race in Canada next weekend after the seven-times Formula One world champion endured severe back pain in a bouncing car at Sunday's Azerbaijan Grand Prix.
The Briton finished fourth in Baku, after starting seventh in a race where both Ferrari drivers retired, but it came at a cost.
"That was the most painful race, the toughest race, I've experienced," Hamilton told reporters.
Team boss Toto Wolff recognised the situation raised concerns.
"He's really bad," the Austrian told reporters. "We've just got to find a solution... I think he is maybe the worst affected from all drivers."
Asked whether there might be a risk of Hamilton missing Montreal, Wolff replied: "Yeah, definitely. I haven't seen him and I haven't spoken to him afterwards, but you can see this is not muscular anymore.
"I mean, this goes properly into the spine and it can have some consequences."
Hamilton, who clutched his back as he clambered out of the car, likened the experience to enduring a four minute cryotherapy session and said he just focused on all the people counting on him to score points.
Team mate George Russell, who finished third, warned on Saturday that it was only a matter of time before the 'porpoising' problem caused a major accident.
"I don't really know what the future holds but I don't think we can sustain this for three years or however long these regulations are in force for," he said.
Red Bull boss Christian Horner, whose drivers finished one-two with world champion Max Verstappen leading Sergio Perez, suggested rivals might be over-playing the problems to secure a favourable rule change on safety grounds.
"I'd tell them to bitch as much as they could and make as big an issue out of it as they possibly could," he said when asked what he would tell his drivers if they suffered from similar bouncing.
"It's part of the game. It's like somebody going into a penalty box.
"You can see it's uncomfortable but there are remedies to that. But it is to the detriment of the car performance. So the easiest thing to do is to then complain from a safety point of view," he added.
Raising the car's ride height would remove much of the bouncing but that would also negatively impact on performance.
Champions Mercedes have been struggling more than most with the bouncing as teams come to terms with sweeping new regulations.
Mercedes F1 Drivers Are Battered, Clearly Rattled After Bouncing in Baku
 

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Re Baku, as contemptuous as I am of Max Verstappen - the dirtiest driver on the grid - and of Christian Horner - the biggest asshole on the grid - I must admit that it warms the cockles of my heart when Ferrari have a double DNF caused by two different mechanical failures. Beautiful. :)
It's just like watching Man City v Liverpool.
 

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It's just like watching Man City v Liverpool.
In the sense of hoping that they both will lose?
Maybe, although if we are to find comparable cheats, I think we would first look to the Iberian Peninsula.
For team managers who act like assholes, there are quite a few, although I think Pep is probably worse than Klopp, constantly moaning and haranguing the referees. As a big Cruyff admirer, I regret that Guardiola was his student.
As for teams with a long, ignominious history of cheating, the one that comes to mind is Juventus, which by sheer coincidence is located in the same part of the world as Ferrari.
 

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In the sense of hoping that they both will lose?
Maybe, although if we are to find comparable cheats, I think we would first look to the Iberian Peninsula.
For team managers who act like assholes, there are quite a few, although I think Pep is probably worse than Klopp, constantly moaning and haranguing the referees. As a big Cruyff admirer, I regret that Guardiola was his student.
As for teams with a long, ignominious history of cheating, the one that comes to mind is Juventus, which by sheer coincidence is located in the same part of the world as Ferrari.
Lol. Yes, I want them both to lose, but it made me realize just how much I despise Red Bull, and when City play Liverpool, I want Liverpool to win. I do like Clopp though.
 

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Lol. Yes, I want them both to lose, but it made me realize just how much I despise Red Bull, and when City play Liverpool, I want Liverpool to win. I do like Clopp though.
We have seats with another PL team. The seats are right next to the visitors' dugout so we get to see up close every visiting manager's comportment for the full 90 minutes.
In interviews Klopp presents this friendly-uncle image, but during the match he is almost as aggressive with the referees as Guardiola is - and that is a lot! I have been really surprised at how much the both of them lean on the referees. I'm talking about Ferguson levels of attempted intimidation.
At the same time, certain other managers keep their cool and act respectfully towards the referees - very refreshing to observe.
 

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We have seats with another PL team. The seats are right next to the visitors' dugout so we get to see up close every visiting manager's comportment for the full 90 minutes.
In interviews Klopp presents this friendly-uncle image, but during the match he is almost as aggressive with the referees as Guardiola is - and that is a lot! I have been really surprised at how much the both of them lean on the referees. I'm talking about Ferguson levels of attempted intimidation.
At the same time, certain other managers keep their cool and act respectfully towards the referees - very refreshing to observe.
Unlike formula 1, harassing the referee is part of the game. I'm not going to hold that against him.
 

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Unlike formula 1, harassing the referee is part of the game. I'm not going to hold that against him.
Unlike Formula One? Have you forgotten what happened in Abu Dhabi in December? Horner and Wheatley's harassment contributed to and may even have caused Masi's idiotic decisions. When they used to have a go at the Race Director they were acting like assholes, and when a football manager is incessantly badgering the referees he is doing the same.
Diving is also part of the game, but that doesn't make it right.
 

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Unlike Formula One? Have you forgotten what happened in Abu Dhabi in December? Horner and Wheatley's harassment contributed to and may even have caused Masi's idiotic decisions. When they used to have a go at the Race Director they were acting like assholes, and when a football manager is incessantly badgering the referees he is doing the same.
Diving is also part of the game, but that doesn't make it right.
That's exactly my point. In football it's a legitimate part of the game, in F1 it isn't.
 

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I find a Red Bull double DNF much more satisfying. Seeing Ferrari implode isn’t quite as fun with Vettel gone. I quite like Leclerc and Sainz, even Binotto is alright in my book.
Okay, but Ferrari is about more than the drivers. They are the team with the longest and strongest history of cheating in all of motor racing. For years they connived with Mosley and Ecclestone to be allowed to get away with things that no other team was allowed to do. Sir Frank Williams told me himself, 'It was funny: whenever we would confidentially submit a new technical idea to the FIA for approval, at the next race Ferrari would show up with the same idea!'.
It was only three years ago that Ferrari were winning races by running illegal power units and yet, when they were finally caught out, instead of fining them heavily as the regulators ought to have done, the FIA did nothing more than to tell them that they shouldn't do it again.
Even still Ferrari are unique in getting paid tens of millions more than any other team just for participating.
I am sure that at Ferrari there are many talented, hard-working people who conduct themselves with integrity, but somehow as an organisation it remains dishonest and unworthy of the mindless adoration that too many 'fans' give it.
 

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Okay, but Ferrari is about more than the drivers. They are the team with the longest and strongest history of cheating in all of motor racing. For years they connived with Mosley and Ecclestone to be allowed to get away with things that no other team was allowed to do. Sir Frank Williams told me himself, 'It was funny: whenever we would confidentially submit a new technical idea to the FIA for approval, at the next race Ferrari would show up with the same idea!'.
It was only three years ago that Ferrari were winning races by running illegal power units and yet, when they were finally caught out, instead of fining them heavily as the regulators ought to have done, the FIA did nothing more than to tell them that they shouldn't do it again.
Even still Ferrari are unique in getting paid tens of millions more than any other team just for participating.
I am sure that at Ferrari there are many talented, hard-working people who conduct themselves with integrity, but somehow as an organisation it remains dishonest and unworthy of the mindless adoration that too many 'fans' give it.
The triple asshole whammy of Marko, Horner and Verstappen trumps all that, imo.
 

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The triple asshole whammy of Marko, Horner and Verstappen trumps all that, imo.
As of the present moment, I would agree. If however we consider a team to be both its current conformation and its legacy (which, after all, is why most of Ferrari's foolish fans are its foolish fans), Ferrari's lead is so big that it is unlikely to be surpassed in our lifetimes (or at least mine!)
 

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As of the present moment, I would agree. If however we consider a team to be both its current conformation and its legacy (which, after all, is why most of Ferrari's foolish fans are its foolish fans), Ferrari's lead is so big that it is unlikely to be surpassed in our lifetimes (or at least mine!)
It's an interesting dynamic. Given the current marketing targets, Red Bull might be a more valuable brand for F1 than Ferrari.
 

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Okay, but Ferrari is about more than the drivers. They are the team with the longest and strongest history of cheating in all of motor racing. For years they connived with Mosley and Ecclestone to be allowed to get away with things that no other team was allowed to do. Sir Frank Williams told me himself, 'It was funny: whenever we would confidentially submit a new technical idea to the FIA for approval, at the next race Ferrari would show up with the same idea!'.
It was only three years ago that Ferrari were winning races by running illegal power units and yet, when they were finally caught out, instead of fining them heavily as the regulators ought to have done, the FIA did nothing more than to tell them that they shouldn't do it again.
Even still Ferrari are unique in getting paid tens of millions more than any other team just for participating.
I am sure that at Ferrari there are many talented, hard-working people who conduct themselves with integrity, but somehow as an organisation it remains dishonest and unworthy of the mindless adoration that too many 'fans' give it.
I wasn’t here for a lot of that so it doesn’t elicit as strong of an emotion as it does for you. I’ve only been following since 2012. The emotion, good or bad, can come from the team or driver but generally, drivers are the main reason for why I like or dislike what I’m getting from my F1 experience.

I’m a little embarrassed that I actually thought Perez might be on Max’s level after his qualifying. I’d really like to see Max lose this year but his second (first legitimate) title seems all but secured.


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I wasn’t here for a lot of that so it doesn’t elicit as strong of an emotion as it does for you. I’ve only been following since 2012. The emotion, good or bad, can come from the team or driver but generally, drivers are the main reason for why I like or dislike what I’m getting from my F1 experience.

I’m a little embarrassed that I actually thought Perez might be on Max’s level after his qualifying. I’d really like to see Max lose this year but his second (first legitimate) title seems all but secured.


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I also tend to follow drivers rather than teams. I've never thought Perez was anything other than a second or third tier F1 driver, he always has a handy excuse for why he hasn't delivered. Max, much as I despise his style and aggressive tactics, is tier 1, he's consistently very fast while minimizing mistakes, like Lewis and a small handful of other drivers over the years (Alonso is the only other current driver I'd put in the same basket).
 
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