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Discussion Starter #82
McLaren the only team allowed to change chassis for 2021 season
24-03-2020 19:48 | Updated: 24-03-2020 19:53

by Editorial Team
McLaren the only team allowed to change chassis for 2021 season


Despite the fact Formula 1 declared that all chassis must be 'frozen' for 2021, McLarenare allowed to make adjustments. The constructor will change engine supplier next year and will be allowed to make the "necessary changes" for the new engine.


Last year McLaren announced that it will once again partner up with Mercedes in 2021 as its engine supplier. McLaren-Mercedes has been a championship-winning combination in the past, although it has been 12 years since the last title was won.
Originally, the deal meant that Mercedes would provide engines for the new regulations era in 2021. The new technical regulations have now been moved to 2022, but this doesn't change anything for the contract signed in 2019.
"This decision does not impact our change to Mercedes power units in 2021," McLaren team principal Andreas Seidl told RaceFans.
"And we will be allowed to make the necessary changes to our car to accommodate this.”
Except for these modifications, McLaren will not be allowed to change anything on the chassis of the MCL35. All teams have decided unanimously to keep the same chassis in 2021 ahead of the big changes in 2022.
  • As a result of the decision of the British government to put the country into lockdown, the doors of the McLaren Technology Centre in Woking will close on Wednesday.
 

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Discussion Starter #83
Formula 1
TECHNICAL
TECH TUESDAY: Why Ferrari have bucked the trend with their 'odd one out' nose concept
mark_hughes_giorgio_piola.png

Technical contributors
Mark Hughes and Giorgio Piola

GettyImages-1209048359.jpg

One of the most visually arresting themes of the 2020 crop of cars was the widescale adoption of the narrow nose. Up until this year, there seemed to be competing philosophies on this: Mercedes had for a long time led the way with the needle nose, with Ferrari and Red Bull in the opposing wide nose camp. But for this year only Ferrari have stayed with the wide nose. Red Bull, Renault and others have become converts to the narrow nose.
READ MORE: How Red Bull forced a last-minute Mercedes design tweak

There are pros and cons to each, concerning aerodynamics, weight and packaging. Aerodynamically, the nose’s upsweep (when seen side-on, in profile) creates a low air pressure zone beneath it, causing the airflow to accelerate as it heads for the underfloor (and, at the edges, towards the barge boards). The faster the airflow, the greater the downforce. The airflow speed is only nominally related to the car’s speed over the ground. Manipulation of air pressures can induce the air to pass over the surfaces at many times the speed of the car – and this is the key to creating downforce, which squares with airflow speed.
SF1000vsW11-comparison.jpg

Dramatic differences in width between the noses of the Mercedes W11 and the Ferrari SF1000 - which could yield dramatically different results...
The downforce created is generally a multiplication of the surface area and the airflow speed. The wide nose creates a greater surface area with which to accelerate the airflow. It can, in theory, accelerate more air. But it tends to be prone to stall, especially at low car speeds. When the airflow falls below a critical speed, it can leave parts of the under-nose area unenergised in a dead zone – leading to loss of control of the flow. The wide nose tends to work better at higher speeds.

The narrow nose seems to offer better control of the aerodynamics at low speed and generally, therefore, more consistent slow corner grip. From the perspective of surface area x airflow speed, the narrow nose offers less surface area, but can more easily induce high airflow speed. As a further benefit, the narrower dimensions leave more space to fit in airflow turning vanes further forwards, so more easily turning the air where it needs to be directed.
To get a narrow nose through the crash test invariably requires it to be heavier than the wider nose, with a denser structure, as the impact loads are obviously spread over a much smaller area. This will mean less ballast is available to vary the weight distribution from circuit to circuit as required.
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Red Bull previously favoured a wide nose design, but the RB16's is much narrower than its predecessor
But perhaps the most fundamental impact of the aerodynamic choice between wide and narrow nose is that of the packaging. This part of the car – with suspension systems, steering, brakes, hydraulic reservoirs – is incredibly mechanically dense. There is so much to fit into a very confined space.
READ MORE: Exploring the suspension layouts that could give Mercedes and Red Bull the edge
Mercedes have been challenged in keeping to their slim nose philosophy by their adoption of the DAS steering system, but have managed to squeeze it in, partly by re-siting the upper wishbone attachment point. Red Bull have only been able to switch to the slim nose concept through a wholesale rearrangement of mechanical components, notably by re-siting the steering and reservoirs behind the bulkhead of the nose - which, unfortunately for Red Bull, has made it unfeasible to incorporate DAS.
013-020 RED  BULL  F SUSPENSION   COMP.jpg

Red Bull's nose has undergone a dramatic repackaging that could mean incorporating DAS is out of the question
Ferrari, having prioritised research on what was to have been their 2021 car (now 2022), opted not to make radical changes. Essentially, they have continued the philosophy of their 2017 car through those of ’18, ’19 and ’20. This is reflected in the current front suspension which is quite simple in layout compared to that of their two main rivals. It can be seen how the wider nose affords more accessible suspension adjustment.
Among a field of slim-nose rivals, the Ferrari suddenly looks the ‘odd one out’. But invariably, there is more than one way to skin a cat.
025-020-FERRARI-F.-SUSPENSION.jpg

Ferrari have stuck with the wider nose, which makes packaging easier - and now the Scuderia are the 'odd ones out'...

 

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McLaren the only team allowed to change chassis for 2021 season
24-03-2020 19:48 | Updated: 24-03-2020 19:53

by Editorial Team
McLaren the only team allowed to change chassis for 2021 season


Despite the fact Formula 1 declared that all chassis must be 'frozen' for 2021, McLarenare allowed to make adjustments. The constructor will change engine supplier next year and will be allowed to make the "necessary changes" for the new engine.


Last year McLaren announced that it will once again partner up with Mercedes in 2021 as its engine supplier. McLaren-Mercedes has been a championship-winning combination in the past, although it has been 12 years since the last title was won.
Originally, the deal meant that Mercedes would provide engines for the new regulations era in 2021. The new technical regulations have now been moved to 2022, but this doesn't change anything for the contract signed in 2019.
"This decision does not impact our change to Mercedes power units in 2021," McLaren team principal Andreas Seidl told RaceFans.
"And we will be allowed to make the necessary changes to our car to accommodate this.”
Except for these modifications, McLaren will not be allowed to change anything on the chassis of the MCL35. All teams have decided unanimously to keep the same chassis in 2021 ahead of the big changes in 2022.
  • As a result of the decision of the British government to put the country into lockdown, the doors of the McLaren Technology Centre in Woking will close on Wednesday.
It's not clear whether this will help or hurt McLaren. By allowing changes to the chassis only to the extent of accommodating a PU of different dimensions, the FIA are not allowing for the possibility that the different dimensions would require a different chassis design in order to replicate the 2020 level and quality of aero effectiveness - which was presumably the reason for the chassis freeze to start with.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Biofuel cooling set to become key development avenue for new F1 cars


Formula 1's switch to biofuels with its new generation of cars looks set to trigger a surprise development battleground thanks to a change it brings in engine cooling characteristics.

As part of F1's continued push for sustainability, new rules - which were originally slated for 2021 but have now been delayed - will require teams to run their engines with a 10% blend of advanced sustainable ethanol.
Work has already begun among F1's fuel suppliers to optimise the cooling potential of the biofuel, which has nearly three times the heat of vaporisation as regular fuel and means there is a cooling effect for the incoming charge during the combustion cycle. A cooler intake charge means that engine power will increase.
Benoit Poulet, F1 development manager for Ferrari's technical partner Shell told Autosport: "The interesting aspect of the car performance is similar to when you put a [ethanol based] cooling gel on your fingers - you can feel the cooling effect that you get. It will be the same for the engine.
"It will be able to cool some parts of the powerunit and that could be quite beneficial. We are working hard on it.
"The properties are certainly quite interesting for combustion, and I think we can do some interesting things. We have definitely found at the moment that this cooling effect is good for the engine."

Engine manufacturers could seek to optimise the cooling properties for a straight horsepower gain, or change the overall design and cooling characteristics to run the engine at a different temperature. This could then have a knock-on effect for the car's aerodynamics.
Poulet explained that Shell has been developing the new biofuel ever since the regulations came out last year in a bid to steal a march on its opposition.
"It's a big challenge but we are really happy to switch to E10 fuel - and to be honest we would be happy to have even more than 10%," Poulet said.
"We have people working on the project, and people who are familiar with E10. And it's a big change because ethanol comes with some different properties to the other hydrocarbons.
"Because of that, we really decided to start early. It's a bit like the chassis people; we started as soon as the regulation was published. On project management, I allocated one person full time on that question and now we have got a good understanding in terms of the benefit of E10."

 

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Just saw an article that put in print what we all pretty well assume, that there will be no F1 for 2020.

Then I thought, what if there had been none in 2019?

And I struggled to think of anything we would have missed. Bits and pieces, a very few races with some action towards the end, but zero that could affect a championship. Overall, this beloved sport has fallen that far.

So are we missing anything by the “lost” 2020 season? This quarantine does give me a chance to show my 23 year old son some films of back in the day when racing was real.
 

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Discussion Starter #87
........
So are we missing anything by the “lost” 2020 season? This quarantine does give me a chance to show my 23 year old son some films of back in the day when racing was real.
I was looking forward to a more competitive car for Verstappen. The Honda PU seemed closer to Ferrari & Mercedes during Barcelona testing..... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #89
MOTORSPORT.COM

Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
TopicGiorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis





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FORMULA 1 / ANALYSIS
How Mercedes has taken F1 brake design to the next level

How Mercedes has taken F1 brake design to the next level

By: Giorgio Piola
Co-author: Matthew Somerfield
Mar 30, 2020, 7:00 AM

Mercedes has made no secret of the fact that every element of its 2020 Formula 1 car has been improved for this year.


And while most of the attention has been dominated by its DAS system and a bold revamp of its sidepod concept, a deep dig into less obvious areas – like its brakes – highlights the attention to detail the team has put in.
The front brake disc bell is a component that usually divides teams into two camps: those looking for maximum stiffness (such as Ferrari) and those that focus their attention on maximum lightness, (such as Red Bull).
However, in the case of Mercedes, it has looked to F1's past for inspiration as its bell has a truncated cone shape that's full of holes. This not only offers the required stiffness with a reduction in weight, but also brings aero benefit too.

Since 2012, when Adrian Newey introduced a contentious solution on the RB8, teams have skewed their designs to take into account a secondary function: aerodynamics.
The blown axle devised by Red Bull, which took air from the brake inlet and ejected it through holes in the side of the stub axle, was discovered by Giorgio Piola at the second grand prix of the season.
Red Bull RB8 blown axle wheel detail

Red Bull RB8 blown axle wheel detail
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
But, it wasn't until the Monaco GP, which Mark Webber went on to win, that the FIA decided to act.
Charlie Whiting considered the combination of the holes in the wheel and axle, allied to the rotation of the cone-shaped stub axle, to constitute a 'moveable aerodynamic device' and declared this and another borderline solution on the RB8 illegal, requiring the team to be compliant for the Canadian GP.
Williams FW35 front brake duct, captioned

Williams FW35 front brake duct, captioned
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
Teams were not content with filing this idea away in a drawer though, with Williams the first to find a legal way of emulating the concept the following season.
The FW35 featured a hollow and open ended stub axle with a fixed nozzle housed within. Fed airflow in a similar way to the banned Red Bull solution, but no longer rotating around the axle's axis, this version may not have had the same potency but still helped to clean up some of the turbulence created by the wheel and tyre.

Over the course of the next few seasons, many of the teams developed this solution to the point that when the FIA was devising the new regulations for 2019 it decided to outlaw them.
Interestingly, Mercedes never pursued the blown axle concept, instead using the tools available to it on the front wing to help manage this turbulence.
However, the regulation changes for 2019 also took away the majority of these tools, stripping away the aerodynamic furniture from the front wings and with it, Mercedes' reliance on them.
Mercedes, like its counterparts, has in the last few years found subtle ways of funnelling airflow through the brake duct in ways that are still considered a form of brake cooling, although they clearly err on the side of being aerodynamic devices.
Mercedes AMG F1 W11 brake flow

Mercedes AMG F1 W11 brake flow
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
The inner crossover pipe, seen here on the W11 (left) but also present on the W10, certainly constitutes as one of these devices, as its sole purpose is to spill airflow out of the wheel face. The pipework is also contorted in such a way that the nozzle falls close to the border created in the regulations to outlaw the blown axle.
The Technical Regulations state: (11.4.3) No air flow may pass through a circular section 105mm in diameter with its centre lying along the axis and its plane coinciding with the inboard face of the wheel fastener described in Article 12.8.2.
Of course this isn't the only duct that serves an aerodynamic purpose, with two others fashioned into the drum itself (right), one of which sits at the base of the drum, whilst the other is interwoven with the trench formed in the drum's surface.
Mercedes AMG F1 W11 brake disc comparsion

Mercedes AMG F1 W11 brake disc comparsion
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
Blown away
Having had great success with this solution in 2019 and having looked at ways it can enhance this further, we must also pay attention to the W11's brake bell, which has been modified extensively by the team for 2020.
The RB8's design could be considered a forefather here, with numerous holes cut very precisely into the bell's surface to create a robust aerodynamic effect that intensifies the flow of air through the assembly and out of the wheel face to influence the wake turbulence created by the wheel and tyre.
It's not yet clear whether the FIA has scrutinised this, considering the precedent set by the Red Bull solution but, suffice to say that Mercedes will justify the inclusion of these holes for weight saving purposes and that any aerodynamic function is simply a by-product of that.
200800


Once again, this is an example of how consumed F1 teams become in the search of performance, as a component that might seem benign to most, is transformed into a clever aerodynamic solution. It also speaks volumes about Mercedes design methodologies too, as just with many other facets of the car it has left no stone unturned in its pursuit of perfection.
Ferrari F2007 (658) 2007 wheel cover airflow
Ferrari F2007 (658) 2007 wheel cover airflow



1/17
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
In 2007, Ferrari introduced a wheel cover design that it convinced the FIA was being used to improve brake cooling. Now, whilst this was the case, it could be argued this was a secondary function, as the design actually had a wider reaching aerodynamic appeal - tidying up the turbulence created by the wheel and tyre. Ferrari's latest solution fashioned a nozzle for that airstream to escape out of, not only creating a more defined pathway but also improving the extraction rate. Other teams swiftly jumped on this bandwagon, realizing the benefits that the simple solution offered
 

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Discussion Starter #91
Would you be on board if you were a Red Bull driver?
IIRC Helmut said that he believes that he has recovered from the virus. So perhaps the team could have Helmut tested for virus antibodies and suggest he donate blood for their treatment? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #94
F1 legend Sir Stirling Moss dies, aged 90
478778666

One of the true greats of Formula 1, Sir Stirling Moss, has died at the age of 90.
Often referred to as the greatest driver never to win the world championship, Moss contested 66 Grands Prix from 1951 to 1961, driving for the likes of Vanwall, Maserati and Mercedes, where he famously formed a contented and ruthlessly effective partnership with lead driver Juan Manuel Fangio.
In that 10-year career, Moss took 16 wins, some of which rank among the truly iconic drives in the sport's history – his 1961 victories in Monaco and Germany in particular often held up as all-time classics.
Moss was also a highly regarded sports car driver, famously winning the 1955 Mille Miglia on public roads for Mercedes at an average speed of close to 100mph, while he also competed in rallies and land-speed attempts.
Following an enforced retirement from racing (bar a brief comeback in saloon cars in the 1980s) after a major crash at Goodwood in 1962, Moss maintained a presence in Formula 1 as both a sports correspondent and an interested observer, before retiring from public life in January of 2018.
All at F1 send our heartfelt condolences to Lady Susie and Sir Stirling's family and friends.
Sir Stirling Moss: 1929-2020
 

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Stirling was my hero when I was a teenager just getting interested in cars and racing (late 50s). I bought In the Track of Speed and was hooked forever. His near-fatal crash cut a brilliant career way too short.
Stirling and Gary.jpg
I got a chance to spend some time with him at the Quail in 2007 and he was a true gentleman and loved the fact I recognized him. He was perfectly happy to chat about cars for probably half an hour. Needless to say I was a Ferrari owner at the time...:)
 

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Discussion Starter #96
Wolff buys shares in Aston Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #98 (Edited)
FIA rule tweak could stop Ferrari blocking lower budget cap

 

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Discussion Starter #99
F1 confirms first details of new 2020 calendar including start in Austria
2020 Austrian Grand Prix
27th April 2020, 9:25 | Written by Dieter Renckenand Keith Collantine

Formula 1 has confirmed the first details of its rescheduled 2020 calendar, which will begin with the Austrian Grand Prix in July.

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The first races of the season will be held “without fans”, Carey confirmed, but the sport is hopeful later races will not have to be held behind closed doors.

“We’re targeting a start to racing in Europe through July, August and beginning of September,” said Carey, “with the first race taking place in Austria on 3rd-5th July weekend.”
Carey previously indicated there will be extensive changes to the original 2020 schedule in order to accommodate other racers which have been postponed.
Today the French Grand Prix became the 10th round of the championship to call off its original scheduled date. It has been cancelled, along with the races in Australia and Monaco, while seven other race promoters are seeking to reschedule their events
Bahrain, which was originally due to hold the second round of the world championship on March 22nd, is among the races which will feature in the new schedule, said Carey. He also confirmed Yas Marina will remain as the season finale:
Start, Bahrain International Circuit, 2019Carey confirmed Bahrain’s race will go ahead“September, October and November would see us race in Eurasia, Asia and the Americas, finishing the season in the Gulf in December with Bahrain before the traditional finale in Abu Dhabi, having completed between 15-18 races. We will publish our finalised calendar as soon as we possibly can.”

However Carey acknowledged their plans could be disrupted by further developments in the global pandemic.

“All of our plans are obviously subject to change as we still have many issues to address and all of us are subject to the unknowns of the virus,” he said.

“We all want the world to return to the one we know and cherish, yet we recognise it must be done in the right and safest way. We look forward to doing our part by enabling our fans to once again safely share the excitement of Formula 1 with family, friends, and the broader community.”
 
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