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Discussion Starter #361
F1i.com
McLaren veteran Neil Trundle gets fitting tribute

McLaren is honoring this weekend at Imola one of its most loyal employees, the venerable Neil Trundle, former chief mechanic to - among others - Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost.
Trundle's epic 33-year stint with McLaren began when his former Brabham colleague and Rondel Racing partner Ron Dennis ushered in a new era for the Woking-based outfit.
From McLaren's first MP4 carbon fibre chassis to the team's 'Golden Child', the dominant McLaren MP4/4, Trundle's unwavering dedication accompanied the team's triumphs.
Eventually, Trundle transitioned to the less frantic atmosphere of McLaren Heritage, wrenching on Woking's outstanding collection of revered machines and overseeing in recent years the development of the capable team that will now look after McLaren's historic cars.
This weekend, Carlos Sainz and Lando Norris' MCL35 machines will carry a special message for Neil ahead of his well-deserved retirement.




https://f1i.com/images/388430-a-thought-for-ayrton.html
 

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F1i.com
McLaren veteran Neil Trundle gets fitting tribute

McLaren is honoring this weekend at Imola one of its most loyal employees, the venerable Neil Trundle, former chief mechanic to - among others - Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost.
Trundle's epic 33-year stint with McLaren began when his former Brabham colleague and Rondel Racing partner Ron Dennis ushered in a new era for the Woking-based outfit.
From McLaren's first MP4 carbon fibre chassis to the team's 'Golden Child', the dominant McLaren MP4/4, Trundle's unwavering dedication accompanied the team's triumphs.
Eventually, Trundle transitioned to the less frantic atmosphere of McLaren Heritage, wrenching on Woking's outstanding collection of revered machines and overseeing in recent years the development of the capable team that will now look after McLaren's historic cars.
This weekend, Carlos Sainz and Lando Norris' MCL35 machines will carry a special message for Neil ahead of his well-deserved retirement.




F1i Pic of the Day: A thought for Ayrton...
I first met Neil the very first time I went to MTC, hopefully we’ll still see him occasionally at Brooklands.
 
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Discussion Starter #363
RACEFANS
“No nasty surprises” designing Mercedes installation for McLaren MCL35M – Key
3rd November 2020, 17:15 | Written by Dieter Rencken and Keith Collantine

In four races’ time, McLaren will make its third change of power unit supplier since the V6 hybrid turbo power units were introduced to F1 six years ago.
Its technical director James Key, who joined the team last year, is well-placed to oversee the change. He already has experience of switching between three different power unit suppliers while at Toro Rosso.
Speaking to RaceFans in an exclusive interview, Key says McLaren are “fully up to speed” with planning the integration of the 2021 Mercedes power unit.

While this will be McLaren’s third change of engine suppliers in seven years, they were loyal to Mercedes for the previous two decades, and were their works F1 operation for much of that time. “It seems to have almost picked up from where it left off,” says Key. “I know we’re not a works operation, but certainly a very close technical and personal link in some cases.
“They’ve shared all the information we need very quickly. They’ve been open to questions, suggestions and ideas which was within the scope of the agreement to help us out.”

Mercedes’ power unit is “the gold standard”, says Key McLaren face a particularly tricky challenge for next season owing to the disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. In their original plan, the switch from Renault to Mercedes power was going to coincide with sweeping new technical regulations coming into force for the 2021 F1 season. However those rules have been postponed by 12 months as a cost-saving measure.
Teams have therefore agreed to largely carry over this year’s chassis to next year. They will be permitted to make a limited number of changes, which are governed by a system of ‘tokens’ covering different areas of the car.

McLaren, the only team switching power unit suppliers for next year, will have to expend all their tokens on making the necessary changes to accommodate the Mercedes. One top of that, they lost several weeks’ work on their 2021 project when their factory was closed as a result of the lockdown.
“[Mercedes] know that we are under pressure and under a short time period as well with the inability to work on it earlier this year in a big way,” says Key. “So it’s started off very well. We’ve been doing some R&D testing with them at their facilities to make sure that our systems are installed in a way that works for both. That seems to be going okay and we’re fully on top of the programme in that respect.”

Carlos Sainz Jnr, McLaren, Autodromo do Algarve, 2020McLaren got in among the Mercedes at AlgarveKey says the design work around changing the MCL35 to accepted a Mercedes instead of a Renault has been “pretty normal, actually, in terms of going from one engine to another.”


“I’ve kind of become familiar with how this transition works,” he says. “And it’s pretty similar to the sorts of work that you have to do from one power unit to the next.

“There are some fundamental architectural differences between the way power units are laid out, as we know, but it’s just really just a case of picking it up and installing it accordingly. So no nasty surprises, no negative points have popped up at all. It’s all been pretty normal and some pleasant surprises, actually, in some cases.”

The team is confident the change will be worthwhile – it’s gaining the best engine in the field at the moment, after all – but some compromises are inevitable, as the team has to retain the core of its current car.

“This is where a bit of a bit of compromise comes in,” admits Key. “So on top of the lack of chassis token capability, we’ve also had to try and install the engine with minimal changes to the car because, of course, you’re supposed to carry the car over. We can’t do that because we’re not retaining an engine.”

This means the team can’t take full advantage of the smaller dimensions of the Mercedes power unit to achieve aerodynamic gains.
“In normal times you’d install it and use the benefits of a tighter package – which is what you get with the architecture of Mercedes engine – to the full. Whereas we’ve had to make minimal changes to our car to allow us to effectively put a Mercedes engine in our car designed for our current engine.
The Mercedes power unit offers packaging gains“So whilst that’s been very well discussed with the FIA, we’ve come to a good agreement on how to keep those changes realistic for us, but also within the bounds of minimal changes, that has worked. But typically, you wouldn’t do that. You’d go further than that and exploit it a little bit more. So there’s been a few compromises there.”
Next year’s McLaren will be officially designated the ‘MCL35B’. Key describes it as “the current car with a Mercedes engine in it, when all’s said and done.

“There’s a couple of changes to architecture necessary by the shape of the engine compared to this year’s. But it’s not fundamentally different.”

However the team has been able to retain the car’s aerodynamic philosophy without making any significant compromises. “There’s been a couple of small dimensional changes which the engine installation has led to which will lead to a minor tweak on aero surfaces,” says Key. “But it hasn’t actually affected aero particularly negatively.

“Because we stuck with a minimum amount possible to try and squeeze the engine it means that the basics of the aero surfaces are pretty similar. There’s no philosophical change, I’d say, to that.”
The MCL35B will be very similar to this year’s carHowever some aerodynamic potential will be left untapped, says Key. “Had we been able to exploit it further and you really go to town with an engine installation, which in normal times you would and you will be able to in future as well, then probably we would have squeezed a bit more out of it. But I don’t think we’ve been left with anything that we feel as a compromise.”
He says the team is satisfied the FIA has drawn a fair distinction between what the team can change on its car to ensure a problem-free integration of the power unit, and opportunistic tweaks which would have allowed them to gain extra performance.

“Whenever we’ve discussed with the FIA areas which will have an impact on aero for the purposes of installing the engine – that’s predominately through the cooling system side of things – that sort of thing, they’ve always recognised that where we’re trying to do the best thing to make sure it works and doesn’t exploit things that other people can’t exploit, for example,” he says. “It’s not a process you’d want if you had a choice but given the extraordinary times we’re in, it’s been a fair process.”

The most significant question is how much of a gain McLaren can expect from fitting what should be F1’s best power unit next year, despite the concessions they will have to make with the design of next year’s car.

“I hesitate to be too accurate with simulation numbers right now,” says Key. “The final performance levels of the ’21 engine are still being worked on and arrived at with Mercedes. I haven’t personally seen that data yet, I don’t think we’ve got it. So I think we’ll know later in the year when we have that data where it sort of sits on a pure performance point of view.

“We obviously expect it to be good. I have to say the Renault performance has been also strong of late, as well. The engines are much closer than they were back in 2014 when there were huge discrepancies. It is definitely closer now, but we hope it will be a little bit of a step forward.”
However some aerodynamic potential will be left untapped, says Key. “Had we been able to exploit it further and you really go to town with an engine installation, which in normal times you would and you will be able to in future as well, then probably we would have squeezed a bit more out of it. But I don’t think we’ve been left with anything that we feel as a compromise.”
He says the team is satisfied the FIA has drawn a fair distinction between what the team can change on its car to ensure a problem-free integration of the power unit, and opportunistic tweaks which would have allowed them to gain extra performance.

“Whenever we’ve discussed with the FIA areas which will have an impact on aero for the purposes of installing the engine – that’s predominately through the cooling system side of things – that sort of thing, they’ve always recognised that where we’re trying to do the best thing to make sure it works and doesn’t exploit things that other people can’t exploit, for example,” he says. “It’s not a process you’d want if you had a choice but given the extraordinary times we’re in, it’s been a fair process.”

The most significant question is how much of a gain McLaren can expect from fitting what should be F1’s best power unit next year, despite the concessions they will have to make with the design of next year’s car.

“I hesitate to be too accurate with simulation numbers right now,” says Key. “The final performance levels of the ’21 engine are still being worked on and arrived at with Mercedes. I haven’t personally seen that data yet, I don’t think we’ve got it. So I think we’ll know later in the year when we have that data where it sort of sits on a pure performance point of view.

“We obviously expect it to be good. I have to say the Renault performance has been also strong of late, as well. The engines are much closer than they were back in 2014 when there were huge discrepancies. It is definitely closer now, but we hope it will be a little bit of a step forward.”
Carlos Sainz Jnr, McLaren, Spa-Francorchamps, 2020Power unit trouble wrecked Sainz’s Spa weekend However, Key notes, it isn’t just pure performance where the team hope to find gains with its new power unit.


“Mercedes have been working very hard. They’ve got a few things they’ve found which they’re hopeful will make a difference from this year to next. So when that data comes through we will know a little bit more.

“But also, I think they have been the gold standard for a while now. They started off that way. They invested early and cracked on with it and were very successful in 2014 and beyond with not just the performance, but also the reliability of their power units has been outstanding as well.

“I think it’s things like that where we will hopefully just feel we can fit and forget really over a weekend, which will be a great place to be So we’ll see where we go.”
 

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F1i.com
McLaren veteran Neil Trundle gets fitting tribute

McLaren is honoring this weekend at Imola one of its most loyal employees, the venerable Neil Trundle, former chief mechanic to - among others - Ayrton Senna and Alain Prost.
Trundle's epic 33-year stint with McLaren began when his former Brabham colleague and Rondel Racing partner Ron Dennis ushered in a new era for the Woking-based outfit.
From McLaren's first MP4 carbon fibre chassis to the team's 'Golden Child', the dominant McLaren MP4/4, Trundle's unwavering dedication accompanied the team's triumphs.
Eventually, Trundle transitioned to the less frantic atmosphere of McLaren Heritage, wrenching on Woking's outstanding collection of revered machines and overseeing in recent years the development of the capable team that will now look after McLaren's historic cars.
This weekend, Carlos Sainz and Lando Norris' MCL35 machines will carry a special message for Neil ahead of his well-deserved retirement.




F1i Pic of the Day: A thought for Ayrton...
I couldn’t mention it before but we are having a Zoom meeting with Neil Trundle now. He thought it was just going to be an interview but there are about 20 of us. I’ll post a link when it’s finished.
 
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Discussion Starter #365
Nov 12 - Nov 15 Turkish GP

PST
Thu, Nov 12Practice 111:55 PMESPN
Fri, Nov 13Practice 23:55 AMESPN2
Sat, Nov 14Practice 312:55 AMESPN
Sat, Nov 14Qualifying 3:55 AMESPN2
Sun, Nov 15Race2:05 AMESPN

Baharain GP Nov 27 - Nov 29
 

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Discussion Starter #366
Formula 1 announces provisional 23-race calendar for 2021
  • 21 March – Australia (Melbourne)
  • 28 March – Bahrain (Sakhir)
  • 11 April – China (Shanghai)
  • 25 April – TBC (TBC)
  • 9 May – Spain (Barcelona)*
  • 23 May – Monaco (Monaco)
  • 6 June – Azerbaijan (Baku)
  • 13 June – Canada (Montreal)
  • 27 June – France (Le Castellet)
  • 4 July – Austria (Spielberg)
  • 18 July – United Kingdom (Silverstone)
  • 1 August – Hungary (Budapest)
  • 29 August – Belgium (Spa)
  • 5 September – Netherlands (Zandvoort)
  • 12 September – Italy (Monza)
  • 26 September – Russia (Sochi)
  • 3 October – Singapore (Singapore)
  • 10 October – Japan (Suzuka)
  • 24 October – USA (Austin)
  • 31 October – Mexico (Mexico City)
  • 14 November – Brazil (Sao Paulo)*
  • 28 November – Saudi Arabia (Jeddah)
  • 5 December – Abu Dhabi (Abu Dhabi).

 

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Discussion Starter #367
MOTORSPORT
W Series to support Formula 1 at eight races in 2021
NOVEMBER 12TH 2020
W Series will return for its second season in 2021, supporting Formula 1 at eight race weekends
W Series 2019 finale, Brands Hatch

W Series will appear as support for F1 at eight races in 2021
Dan Istitene/Getty Images
AUTHOR
Jake Williams-Smith
W Series will support eight Formula 1 races next season in a new partnership between the two championships.
The agreement builds on the plans for the all-female racing category to stage a round during this year’s Mexican GP weekend. That race — and the entire 2020 W Series season — was cancelled as the coronavirus pandemic took hold.
Today’s announcement should ensure a high-profile return for W Series in 2021. The races that it will support are yet to be announced; it could fill the gaps left by Formula 2 and Formula 3, which will run to a new format next year, with a reduced number of race weekends.


“After such a successful inaugural season [2019], we at W Series are absolutely delighted to be partnering with Formula 1 for 2021 and beyond,” said W Series chief executive officer Catherine Bond Muir.

“Formula 1 is by some margin the world’s premier motor racing series, and, when we promised that W Series would be bigger and better in the future, partnering with Formula 1 was always our ultimate objective. There is no doubt that, now that W Series will be run alongside and in collaboration with Formula 1, our global reach, impact and influence will be increased significantly.”
W Series had announced two new races for its 2020 season, with Russia and Sweden joining the calendar, along with eight new drivers joining the series for year two.
The 2021 season will be the final chance for a reigning champion to defend her crown. Regulation changes will mean the winner will have to move on from the series after becoming champion. Jamie Chadwick was the 2019 winner.
“Everything that made W Series so popular and successful in 2019 will remain,” said Bond Muir. “The cars will be identical, the racing will be close and competitive, and our mission will always be to further the interests and prospects of female racing drivers. We want W Series to entertain, and entertain it will.

“We also want it to become a crucial default-option stepping stone for any female racing driver who wants to carve out a professional racing career, and our proximity to Formula 1 will help and enhance that process. The fact that W Series is now eligible for FIA Super Licence points will also be an important factor in that regard.
“We are very grateful to Chase Carey, Ross Brawn and their colleagues for having faith in W Series, and for prioritising diversity and inclusion in this way, and we intend to help them drive forwards their excellent #WeRaceAsOne programme this year and in years to come.”
F1 managing director of motorsports Ross Brawn added that the series was an important showcase of diversity in motor sport.
“It is a really important moment for us to welcome W Series as partners for eight races this season. They have been a beacon to many since they began racing in 2019.
“We believe it is incredibly important to give everyone the chance to reach the highest levels of our sport and their partnership with Formula 1 next season shows our determination and commitment to showcase their exciting series and the importance of building greater diversity across the sport.”
 

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Discussion Starter #368
the-race.com
WHAT CAUSED F1’S NO-GRIP FRIDAY? THE BIG QUESTIONS ANSWERED
By Edd Straw

Friday practice for the Turkish Grand Prix was defined by drivers struggling for grip, with Carlos Sainz describing it as “the strangest Friday I’ve done in my life” and laptimes well off what was expected even by the end of the day.

This was down to the combination of the newly-resurfaced track and the conditions not offering the anticipated grip, with the first session a nightmare for drivers as they wheelspun their way around the track.
Here is why this happened.
WHY IS THE TRACK SURFACE SO LOW-GRIP?
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Turkish Grand Prix Preparation Day Istanbul, Turkey
The track has a high-quality, very smooth surface that should offer plenty of grip in the future. But these were unusual conditions, exacerbated by the fact the track was recently resurfaced with work only completed two weeks ago and therefore still with plenty of oils to be worked out of the surface.

Fighting invisible rain: The bizarre illusion of Turkey practice
Read more


Overnight rain and morning track-cleaning work meant there was still some dampness on the circuit in FP1, while the relatively low temperatures made it more difficult to build tyre temperature. Drivers found it impossible to “turn on” the tyres in the morning, effectively making it like driving in icy conditions.
While conditions improved and laptimes lowered as the day progressed thanks to it being easier – but far from easy – to build temperature, it remained a low-grip surface at the end of the day, with some drivers having to complete multiple preparation laps to get the energy into the tyres on a track that didn’t offer the levels of adhesive grip expected of a new surface.
Given the temperatures F1 tyres are designed to work in, the conditions and the smooth surface mean the Pirellis simply do not work. By comparison, on a coarser surface, cars would have been able at least to find a little more mechanical grip thanks to the different way the tyre interacts with such a surface.
Max Verstappen Red Bull Turkish Grand Prix practice Istanbul 2020

“It’s hard to warm up the tyre because you don’t generate the heat, you don’t put the energy in so you are not able to generate the grip,” said Pirelli F1 boss Mario Isola.
“If you fit a Formula 1 tyre on your road car, you will probably slide everywhere because a road car is not able to put any energy into the tyres and therefore hit the tyre. The compounds for motorsport are designed to work at a high temperature because the level of stress, as an average, is quite high. Therefore they are designed to work at 80°C, 90°C even more than 100°C in some cases – in F1 we reach more than 130°C sometimes on the surface.
“The reason they are sliding is that the surface is very cold, the bulk of the compound is very cold and you are not able to put the energy into the compound so you don’t generate the mechanical grip – the interaction between the compound and the Tarmac – and the chemical grip, that is the ability of the surface to stick on the Tarmac.”
WHY SO MUCH WORSE THAN PORTUGAL?
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Portuguese Grand Prix Race Day Portimao, Portugal
Ahead of the weekend, Pirelli anticipated a similar track surface to the one at the Algarve circuit that hosted the Portuguese Grand Prix last month. While cars struggled for grip there – famously so in the early laps of the race – this has proved even more challenging at Istanbul Park.
While the track surface laid is ostensibly similar, the work was overseen by different companies and inevitably there are variations between products. The aggregate – the hard substances used along with the bitumen to form the surface – was different for the two tracks.
“I was expected a Tarmac that was more similar to Portimao, a smooth Tarmac with bitumen on top but we had some grip, the tyres were able to develop some grip,” said Isola. “Instead, here we had no grip – probably a combination of the temperature, the fact it was damp, the type of Tarmac and the [compound] selection.”
As the work in Turkey was overseen by Tilke Engineers & Architects, there’s no question about its quality. The difference today is simply the consequence of variations in conditions, the timing and the exact product use.
DID THE TRACK REALLY NEED TO BE RESURFACED?
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Turkish Grand Prix Practice Day Istanbul, Turkey
The fact that it was a late decision to resurface the circuit suggests not, as it’s understood not to have been a condition of holding the race even though the event was only formally announced in late August.
The surface that was in place was to F1 standard,s having been used for the previous two Turkish Grands Prix as the circuit was resurfaced before the 2010 race. This was an abrasive surface, which played a part in Pirelli’s compound choices.
The decision to resurface the track was only made a month ago and work was completed just two weeks ago, meaning there is significant bitumen on or near to the surface.
HOW MUCH HAS THE TRACK EVOLVED?
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Turkish Grand Prix Practice Day Istanbul, Turkey
The fact the fastest time in FP2 was almost 6.5s faster than in FP1 shows that conditions improved dramatically, with the track evolution as the surface rubbers in part of this. There are compound gains here given the conditions were so bad in FP1 that it was almost impossible to build tyre temperature in the first part of the session.
Pirelli expects there to be significant track evolution as the weekend progresses, although the absence of any support categories means the rate will not be as high as it would be on a weekend where categories such as Formula 2, Formula 3 and the Porsche Supercup are racing.
The cars are fundamentally faster than they were last time F1 visited Istanbul Park, yet the fastest time is still almost 3.3s off Sebastian Vettel’s 2011 pole position time, meaning we can expect lap times to improve by several seconds tomorrow.
WHY DIDN’T PIRELLI CHOOSE SOFTER COMPOUNDS?
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Turkish Grand Prix Practice Day Istanbul, Turkey
Pirelli decided to bring the hardest available compounds – C1, C2 and C3 – before it was aware the track would be resurfaced, and only had F1 data from its one previous race here back in 2011.
There were also concerns about the high stress on the tyres thanks to downforce levels, traction and lateral load, hence the decision to modify the standard allocation for each driver to give them an extra set of hard tyres at the expense of the usual seventh set of softs.
In normal circumstances, this would be a logical move given the extreme forces the circuit would generate. But with the low grip levels meaning the fastest time on Friday was well off the 2011 pole time, this has not been a concern today.
Isola suggested that Pirelli could have brought the C2-C4 tyre range instead had the resurfacing work been completed earlier, but believes graining would have been too problematic had the softest available tyre – the C5 – been used.
WHAT IF IT RAINS?
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Eifel Grand Prix Practice Day Nurbugring, Germany
The track was damp in places this morning as a consequence of overnight rain and the pressure cleaning of the track ahead of practice. But there is the possibility of genuine rain tomorrow that could make the track surface even more challenging.
When rain falls onto a fresh track surface, it effectively draws out the low-grip bitumen. Because the water is more dense, the bitumen floats on its surface, making it even lower-grip.
On a fresh surface, this is a particular problem as usually it will be rich in bitumen whereas with a more mature surface it will be less of a concern because over time the bitumen breaks down – a process accelerated by hot weather.
While some of the more alarmist comments questioned if racing would be possible at all if it rained, the drivers feel it’s not that critical. But it will certainly be incredibly low-grip in the wet and, combined with cold conditions, this could make it very difficult to drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #369
RACEFANS
2020 Turkish Grand Prix grid
2020 Turkish Grand Prix
Posted on
14th November 2020,
Written by
Keith Collantine

Lance Stroll took pole position for the Turkish Grand Prix ahead of Max Verstappen and Sergio Perez.
PositionDriverTime
1Lance Stroll1’47.765
2Max Verstappen1’48.055
3Sergio Perez1’49.321
4Alexander Albon1’50.448
5Daniel Ricciardo1’51.595
6Lewis Hamilton1’52.560
7Esteban Ocon1’52.622
8Kimi Raikkonen1’52.745
9Valtteri Bottas1’53.258
10Antonio Giovinazzi1’57.226
11Lando Norris1’54.945
12Sebastian Vettel1’55.169
13Carlos Sainz Jnr1’55.410
14Charles Leclerc1’56.696
15Pierre Gasly1’58.556
16Kevin Magnussen2’08.007
17Daniil Kvyat2’09.070
18Romain Grosjean2’12.909
19Nicholas Latifi2’21.611
20George Russell2’10.017
 

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Discussion Starter #370
:( :(
RACEFANS
Carlos Sainz Jnr, McLaren, Istanbul Park, 2020Sainz given three-place grid drop
2020 Turkish Grand Prix
Posted on
14th November 2020,
Written by
Keith Collantine

Carlos Sainz Jnr has been given a three-place grid penalty for impeding Sergio Perez.

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The stewards ruled McLaren had warned Sainz that Perez was behind him as he left the pits, but failed to make way for the Racing Point driver quickly enough.

“Car 55 [Sainz] was exiting the pits as car 11 [Perez] passed through turn one,” the stewards ruled. “Car 11 caught up to car 55 in turn two and three and was unnecessarily impeded by car 55 at that point and through several subsequent turns.

“While extraordinary track conditions clearly impacted the situation, radio communications from the team clearly warned car 55 that car 11 was behind him.”

THE-RACE
WHY NORRIS WAS PENALISED WHEN STROLL WASN’T
By Valentin Khorounzhiy

The FIA announced two yellow flag summons shortly after the conclusion of the qualifying for the Turkish Grand Prix – one for Lance Stroll and his Racing Point team, and one for Lando Norris and his McLaren team.

But while Stroll was not assessed any sort of penalty, with the stewards ruling “no further action” in his case, Norris picked up a hefty five-place grid drop.
This was despite the details of the two cases being similar in many ways.

Stroll keeps pole as he’s cleared of yellow flag breach
Read more

Norris’s faux-pas was in Q1 and Stroll was investigated for a Q3 lap, but in both cases the track was in the process of drying – which is acknowledged in both verdicts. The changing track conditions automatically boosted the drivers’ chances of improving on their existing best times.
In both cases, the drivers made an effort to slow for yellow flags. The verdict for Stroll reads that “car 18 [Stroll] clearly came off the throttle, coasted into the corner, and then accelerated when clear of the incident”.
Likewise, it is acknowledged that “telemetry shows that car 4 [Norris] slowed in the sector [where the yellow flags were] and resumed speed after the incident”.
And of course, both were summoned over an alleged breach of the same article of Appendix H of the FIA International Sporting Code, and the same section in the Race Director’s Event Notes for the Turkish GP. The two of those broadly outline the same thing.
Lance Stroll takes Turkish Grand Prix pole 2020

However, the reason for why the stewards showed lenience to Stroll and yet harshly penalised Norris is very simple, and has to do with the nature of yellow flags deployed.
In Stroll’s case, his team-mate Sergio Perez going off track up ahead yielded a single-waved yellow flag.
As outlined in the race director’s notes, under single-waved yellows “it must be clear that driver has reduced speed in the relevant marshalling sector”. The driver is also not allowed to overtake unless in case of force majeure with the car that they are passing.
Stroll didn’t pass anyone under yellows – and in the stewards’ eyes, though “sector times do not clearly show this as the track was rapidly drying”, he slowed sufficiently. Therefore, he was let off.

However, the yellow flags for the beached Williams of Nicholas Latifi were double-waved. Race director’s notes make a distinction that in the case of double-waved yellows a driver “must reduce speed significantly and be prepared to stop”.
“In order for the stewards to be satisfied that any such driver has complied with these requirements it must be clear that he has not attempted to set a meaningful laptime, for practical purposes this means the driver should abandon the lap,” the notes add.
There is no indication from the stewards that Norris did not slow sufficiently at the site of the incident, but he did set an improved time, which obviously contravenes the above directive.
This means he and McLaren effectively ignored double-waved yellow flags, which as per precedent carries with it a five-place grid penalty.
Lando Norris McLaren Turkish Grand Prix 2020 Istanbul

“[After going past the incident] car 4 then asked his team if he should abort the lap, but was told to stay out because of the rapidly changing track conditions,” the stewards wrote. “Car 4 completed the lap, which turned out to be his fastest lap of Q1.
“While the stewards acknowledge that car 4 was not attempting to set a quick lap time, due to the changing track conditions he nevertheless did so and thereby breached the referenced regulations.”
Norris also received three penalty points on his licence (taking him to five for the 12-month period), which may be the more contentious of the two sanctions.
F1 drivers have questioned whether the penalty points system is fit for purpose in its current state earlier this year, and Norris’ penalty potentially represents another case where a driver picked up points on their licence despite the team having wrongly advised them and therefore carrying a bigger proportion of the blame.
 

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Well that sucks. Have a poor qualifying and then both cars get significant penalties...what a mess.
 

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Discussion Starter #372
Well that sucks. Have a poor qualifying and then both cars get significant penalties...what a mess.
Yes. The McLaren cars were handling well in the slippery conditions. Pity the penalties were incurred...
 

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Well that sucks. Have a poor qualifying and then both cars get significant penalties...what a mess.
Given the new surface, the potential for rain (I haven't looked at the forecast though), and the Mercedes further back, it could still be a very interesting race. I probably won't be getting up at 0200 to watch it live though ..
 

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McLaren 720S spider, 2020. Spark.
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Double checking that the DVR is set to record.
 
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Discussion Starter #375 (Edited)
:)
Interesting race finish - Hamilton #1 & 2020 WDC7, Perez #2 w/o seat for next year, Vettel #3 his last race (podium?) at Ferrari & Binotto not at the race.
———————————
Constructor Standings
PTS
1Mercedes504
2Red Bull240
3Racing Point154
4McLaren149
5Renault136
6Ferrari130
7AlphaTauri89
8Alfa Romeo8
9Haas3
10Williams0

AUTAUT2HUNGBRGBR2ESPBELITAITA2RUSGER2PORITA3TURBRNBRN2ARE
3743402534414317444125444425
-272823352223-15191915-14
814182822316101212682
2612210296308-1081015
444204-23121216156151
19-816126--586131027
61-6124276681012
2-------2-1-3-
--1-------2---

 

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Discussion Starter #376
Nov 27 - Nov 29 Baharain GP

PST

Fri Nov 27Practice 112:55 AMESPN
Fri Nov 27Practice 26:55 AMESPNews
Sat Nov 28Practice 33:55 AMESPN2
Sat Nov 28Qualifying6:55 AMESPNews
Sun Nov 29Race6:05 AMESPN2


Spanish-Formula 1 Sakhir Grand Prix Dec 4-6th
 

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Discussion Starter #377
Lewis Hamilton to be awarded knighthood in New Year’s Honours after 7th F1 world championship win
 

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Here’s a link to the Zoom meeting we held with Neil Trundle. Zak did join but left shortly after the start so didn’t talk.
 
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Discussion Starter #379
:( After a strong start from McLaren in qualy Carlos Sainz goes spinning in Q2 meaning, he won’t start higher than 15th tomorrow.



F1 2020 Bahrain Grand Prix - Full Qualifying Results

Lewis Larkam
28 Nov 2020
Full qualifying esults for the Bahrain Grand Prix at the Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir, round 15 of the 2020 F1 world championship season.


POS.DRIVERNAT.TEAMQ1Q2Q3
1Lewis HamiltonGBRMercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team1m 28.3431m 27.5861m 27.264
2Valtteri BottasFINMercedes AMG Petronas Formula One Team1m 28.7671m 28.0631m 27.553
3Max VerstappenNEDAston Martin Red Bull Racing1m 28.8851m 28.0251m 27.678
4Alexander AlbonTHAAston Martin Red Bull Racing1m 28.7321m 28.7491m 28.274
5Sergio PerezMEXBWT Racing Point F1 Team1m 29.1781m 28.8941m 28.322
6Daniel RicciardoAUSRenault F1 Team1m 29.0051m 28.6481m 28.417
7Esteban OconFRARenault F1 Team1m 29.2031m 28.9371m 28.419
8Pierre GaslyFRAScuderia AlphaTauri Honda1m 28.9711m 29.0081m 28.448
9Lando NorrisGBRMcLaren F1 Team1m 29.4641m 28.8771m 28.542
10Daniil KvyatRUSScuderia AlphaTauri Honda1m 29.1581m 28.9441m 28.618
11Sebastian VettelGERScuderia Ferrari1m 29.1421m 29.149
12Charles LeclercMONScuderia Ferrari1m 29.1371m 29.165
13Lance StrollCANBWT Racing Point F1 Team1m 28.6791m 29.557
14George RussellGBRWilliams Racing1m 29.2941m 31.218
15Carlos SainzESPMcLaren F1 Team1m 28.975No time set
16Antonio GiovinazziITAAlfa Romeo Racing Orlen1m 29.491
17Kimi RaikkonenFINAlfa Romeo Racing Orlen1m 29.810
18Kevin MagnussenDENHaas F1 Team1m 30.111
19Romain GrosjeanFRAHaas F1 Team1m 30.138
20Nicholas LatifiCANWilliams Racing1m 30.182

 

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:( After a strong start from McLaren in qualy Carlos Sainz goes spinning in Q2 meaning, he won’t start higher than 15th tomorrow.
To be fair, it must have been a mechanical failure, as the rear axle locked. Hopefully, it can be fixed in time to start.
 
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