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Discussion Starter #321 (Edited)
Don’t see any confirmation of this yet ?? Rumor source appears to be Eddie Jordan.
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DAILY MAIL
Ineos in £700m bid to buy F1 giants Mercedes with chemicals giant and Britain's richest man Sir Jim Ratcliffe set to take 70 per cent share in team
By Oliver Holt and Jonathan Mcevoy
The Mail On Sun
13 Sep 2020


  • The chemical company agreed a £100m sponsorship with the team this season

  • It has been claimed Ineos will take up a 70 per cent share in the manufacturer
  • The investment would mark Sir Jim Ratcliffe's most significant foray into sport
Lewis Hamilton's Mercedes Formula One team is close to signing a £700million deal that will see it sold to chemicals giant Ineos and Britain's richest man, Sir Jim Ratcliffe, it was claimed on Saturday night.
Ineos, who agreed a £100m sponsorship agreement with Mercedes at the start of the season, bought cycling's former Team Sky last year.

The company, which also own French football club Nice and are funding Ben Ainslie's America's Cup yachting challenge, have agreed to buy a 70 per cent share in the German team, according to former F1 team boss Eddie Jordan and another source close to the deal.
 

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I was stunned to see the chaotic restart that claimed multiple cars, including Sainz. Can someone please educate me on how/why the green flag alone is not sufficient? Why does P1 at or after the green flag get to determine the “jump”? Electronic flagging system on the restart straight would seem to be the safest method of synchronizing all drivers.

- an F1 newbie
 

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Discussion Starter #323 (Edited)
I was stunned to see the chaotic restart that claimed multiple cars, including Sainz. Can someone please educate me on how/why the green flag alone is not sufficient? Why does P1 at or after the green flag get to determine the “jump”? Electronic flagging system on the restart straight would seem to be the safest method of synchronizing all drivers.

- an F1 newbie
Yes clearly not good to say the least - could have resulted in serious injury.

This is what Bottas said
“We’re allowed to race from the control(finish) line, which has been there for a while I think,” - “It’s just the decision this year has been that [on] the Safety Car they are putting the lights off quite late so you can only build the gap pretty late on.

“Of course when you’re at the lead you try to maximise your chances. I’m not at all to blame for that. Everyone can look everything they want for it.

“I was doing consistent speed until I went. Yes, I went late, but we start racing from the control line, not before that.

“So the guys behind who crashed because of that, they can look in the mirror, there’s no point whining about it.”
“I think the FIA or FOM, I don’t know who decides with the Safety Cars but they’re trying to make the show better by turning the lights later so you can’t build a gap early and then go like a corner before the main straight. So maybe it’s time to think if that’s right and safe to do so.”

Some drivers at the rear anticipated the Bottas start and accelerated too soon .... :(

More info if wanted ....
 

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Discussion Starter #326
MOTORSPORTWEEK
Brown: Nearly every F1 team will be 2022 contender
by Phillip Horton


Brown: Nearly every F1 team will be 2022 contender
Lando Norris (GBR) McLaren MCL35. Tuscan Grand Prix, Sunday 13th September 2020. Mugello Italy.


McLaren CEO Zak Brown has emphasised that McLaren must be wary of its midfield rivals’ potential when Formula 1 introduces revised regulations in 2022.
Formula 1 was poised to welcome overhauled sporting and technical regulations, aimed at reducing disparity between the teams, for next season, but this has been delayed by 12 months due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Brown’s McLaren outfit slumped to ninth in the 2017 standings, amid its low ebb with Honda, but a difficult 2018 prompted a restructuring of its organisation, which included the arrival of Andreas Seidl as Team Principal.
It returned to the podium en route to fourth in the Constructors’ Championship last season and this year has taken two top-three finishes, and holds third place in the standings.
But Brown says McLaren must also be aware that opponents such as Racing Point and Renault are well-equipped and are targeting 2022 as their chance to make a breakthrough.
“Ultimately our goal is to catch whoever’s in first place, and that’s been Mercedes for quite some time,” said Brown.
“We’re certainly encouraged that we’re now racing Ferrari, because we weren’t last year and haven’t been for quite some time.
“I think in 2022 with this reset for all of us it gives us a great opportunity.
“That being said, Renault’s coming on strong, Racing Point is quick and just got a four-time World Champion.
“While we want to catch the, currently, two teams in front of us now I think we need to pay a lot of attention and recognise the teams four, five, six and even seven [in the standings] right now are all going to be serious contenders when the budget gap comes in.
“Everyone’s starting on a clean sheet of paper which, I think, then means we’re going to have an awesome era of Formula 1.”
Formula 1 will introduce a budget cap of $145m next year, lowered from the original $175m figure announced in October 2019, which will reduce to $135m by 2023.
 

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Discussion Starter #327
Sept 25-27: Russian Grand Prix, Sochi, Russia
PST
P1ESPN2Fri Sep 25th12:55 AM
P2ESPN2Fri Sep 25th04:55 AM
P3ESPNSat Sep 26th01:55 AM
QESPN2Sat Sep 26th04:55 AM
RaceESPN2Sun Sep 27th04:05 AM
 

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Discussion Starter #328
FORMULA1
REVEALED: The driver you voted as the most impressive so far in 2020

1207273484

With nine rounds of 2020 down, we're over the half-way mark of this 17-race season – so which of the 21 drivers to have driven in Formula 1 so far this year has impressed you most? We asked you to vote, and more than 87,000 of you did – here are the results...
So who did you vote for? Was it dominant championship leader Lewis Hamilton, who's on the verge of breaking every record in the book? Or perhaps fan favourites Max Verstappen and Charles Leclerc got your nod?

Well in fact, your number one is actually someone who doesn't drive for one of the 'big three' teams, nor someone who has stood on the top step of the podium this year... Scroll down to see who your top five drivers are, and to see the voting breakdown.

Formula One World Championship

Ricciardo's been in great form this year
5. Daniel Ricciardo – 7% of the vote
The Australian has shone for Renault this year, taking 53 points and sitting seventh in the championship so far. He finished fourth in Belgium (with Fastest Lap), sixth in Italy and fourth again in Tuscany – with a first Renault podium surely just around the corner. All that was enough to grab him seven per cent of the votes in our poll.
4. Max Verstappen – 11% of the vote
Red Bull's flying Dutchman has taken a podium in every race he's finished, even winning the 70th Anniversary Grand Prix at Silverstone – from fourth on the grid. Retirements in the last two races have frustrated Verstappen, but he still eanred 11% of the vote.
3. Lewis Hamilton – 12% of the vote
The championship leader, Hamilton has led on and off the track and won six of the nine races so far to take 190 points. Looking ever more likely to be on his way to a record-equalling seventh title, Hamilton is also on the verge of breaking Michael Schumacher's all-time win record of 91 Grands Prix - and 12% of voters went for the Mercedes man in our poll.
F1 Grand Prix of Tuscany

Lewis Hamilton may be closing in on yet another world championship - but he didn't win this vote...
2. Pierre Gasly – 18% of the vote
Since being dropped by Red Bull down to sister team Toro Rosso in 2019, Gasly has shown brilliant form that culminated in a stunning Italian Grand Prix win at Monza for AlphaTauri – his first ever victory, and the Faenza squad's first since 2008 when Sebastian Vettel won at the very same track. But despite his Monza heroics, he didn't quite win this vote...
1. Lando Norris – 23% of the vote
Fourth in the championship, Norris entertained us during lockdown in the Virtual Grand Prix series earlier this year and started the 2020 season with a bang, taking a podium in the season-opener. Since then, he's finished in the points in every race bar Hungary and took a brilliant P4 in Italy. All of which was enough to secure him 23% of the votes cast, making him our winner. But will he still occupy top slot come the end of the year...?
 

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Discussion Starter #329

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Discussion Starter #330
BBC
Stefano Domenicali: Ex-Ferrari boss to head Formula 1
By Andrew Benson Chief F1 writer
Last updated on 22 September 202022 September 2020.From the section Formula 1
Stefano Domenicali, Fernando Alonso, Felipe Massa and Kimi Raikkonen
Stefano Domenicali on the podium at the 2013 Spanish Grand Prix along with Ferrari pair Fernando Alonso (second left, race winner) and Felipe Massa (right, third) and Kimi Raikkonen, then of Lotus, who came second
Former Ferrari team principal Stefano Domenicali is to become the new boss of Formula 1 next year.
The Italian, who left Ferrari early in 2014, is the chief executive of sports car manufacturer Lamborghini.

The 55-year-old's appointment has not been announced by F1, but has been confirmed to the BBC by senior sources.
Chase Carey, CEO and chairman of F1 since US group Liberty Media took over the sport in 2017, will stay as chairman in a form still to be decided.
A spokesman for F1 declined to comment on Domenicali's new position. Domenicali himself did not immediately respond to a request to comment.
The news has been communicated to team bosses.
Domenicali's appointment means the sport’s commercial rights holder and governing body will both be led by former Ferrari team bosses.
Domenicali took over at Ferrari from Jean Todt, the current FIA president, at the end of 2007.
Todt has said he will not stand for re-election when his third term ends next year.
Domenicali is a highly respected and well-liked figure in F1, a charismatic and genial character with a strong track record in management.
He is the last team principal under whom Ferrari won a world title - the constructors’ championship in 2008.
He resigned in 2014 after refusing to comply with then-president Luca di Montezemolo’s wish for him to sack Ferrari's engine head after the team badly underestimated the requirements of the new turbo-hybrid engine regulations.
Domenicali then took up a senior management role at Audi, before being appointed chief executive of Lamborghini, which is also part of the VW Audi Group.
He also has a senior role at the FIA as head of the single-seater commission.
 

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Discussion Starter #331
Wonder if at Mugello the restart procedure could be changed so that the first lap after the safety car enters the pit lane no overtaking is allowed until the start finish line is crossed for the second lap? That way the cars would all be at race speed.
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planetF1
Sainz wants ‘brainstorm’ to review Mugello crash
September 24 2020
Carlos Sainz Tuscan GP crash

Carlos Sainz is planning a “brainstorm” session with his fellow F1 drivers over the Mugello crash he describes as the “second biggest” of his career.

The Spaniard was among four rivals who exited the Tuscan Grand Prix as a direct result of a melee upon the Safety Car restart along the Mugello pits straight.

The others whose races were ended by the incident were Kevin Magnussen, Antonio Giovinazzi and Nicholas Latifi, although the race stewards apportioned no individual blame and merely issued warnings to 12 drivers.

It was believed to have been caused by certain drivers anticipating the restart and speeding up before race leader Valtteri Bottas had accelerated himself.

McLaren driver Sainz is eager to engage in talks before FP1 of the Russian Grand Prix at Sochi in order to avert any potential repeat of what he considered to be a “huge” crash.

“I think we need to take some lessons and learn from it,” said the 26-year-old during his press conference on the eve of the race weekend.

“I think we as drivers didn’t make our lives easy, some people second-guessing the restart and making it very complicated for the people at the back.

“We will definitely discuss that tomorrow. I think we need to analyse together with the FIA what we can do better because the crash was huge – it could have been a lot worse I think, especially when I watched it back.

“It could have been much worse if the cars I took with me, or the cars that were in that concertina effect, had been at different angles when you take them.
“We were lucky nothing happened, but looking at the accident again it was a serious accident and could have been much worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #332
RACEFANS
2020 Russian Grand Prix grid
2020 Russian Grand Prix
26th September 2020
by Keith Collantine

Row 11. Lewis Hamilton 1’31.304
Mercedes
2. Max Verstappen1’31.867
Red Bull
Row 23. Valtteri Bottas 1’31.956
Mercedes
4. Sergio Perez 1’32.317
Racing Point
Row 35. Daniel Ricciardo1’32.364
Renault
6. Carlos Sainz Jnr1’32.550
McLaren
Row 47. Esteban Ocon 1’32.624
Renault
8. Lando Norris 1’32.847
McLaren
Row 59. Pierre Gasly 1’33.000
Toro Rosso
10. Alexander Albon1’33.008
Red Bull
Row 611. Charles Leclerc1’33.239
Ferrari
12. Daniil Kvyat 1’33.249
Toro Rosso
Row 713. Lance Stroll 1’33.364
Racing Point
14. George Russell1’33.583
Williams
Row 815. Sebastian Vettel1’33.609
Ferrari
16. Romain Grosjean1’34.592
Haas
Row 917. Antonio Giovinazzi1’34.594
Alfa Romeo
18. Kevin Magnussen1’34.681
Haas
Row 1019. Nicholas Latifi 1’35.066
Williams
20. Kimi Raikkonen1’35.267
Alfa Romeo
 

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Bottas wins with the best car by a great margin on the grid but it takes some 10 seconds penalty for Hamilton to make that happen
 

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Discussion Starter #335
Bottas wins with the best car by a great margin on the grid but it takes some 10 seconds penalty for Hamilton to make that happen
Yes. Not a good weekend for Hamilton. Interesting analysis of Bottas performance by Hughes below ....

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Did Bottas really compromise his qualifying in Sochi to ensure Russian GP victory?
Special contributor
Mark Hughes

Monday Morning Debrief Russia.jpg

Mercedes’ Valtteri Bottas seemed weirdly calm on the Saturday of the Russian Grand Prix, despite having just qualified 0.652s adrift of his polesitting team mate Lewis Hamilton in third, and with the Red Bull of Max Verstappen in front of him. But was this all part of the Finn’s masterplan? Mark Hughes investigates...
Given that the Mercedes of Lewis Hamilton was effectively out of contention because of the double penalties incurred for making practice starts outside the designated area, the Russian Grand Prix might have been expected to have given Max Verstappen a very realistic shot at victory.
The Red Bull driver had outqualified the other Mercedes of Valtteri Bottas, after all, and has twice this year (in Hungary and Spain) managed to prevail over the second Merc in a straight fight. Yet Verstappen was unable to offer Bottas any threat at all on race day in Sochi.

What was behind this switch-around in form between Bottas and Verstappen? It’s clear that there was an under-performance from Bottas in the final Q3 runs of Saturday, one that was not representative of his true potential. It’s also apparent that the form of the Red Bull was somewhat volatile.
Part of that volatility was the state of the track. It’s clear that it became much faster in Q3 – and Bottas, outqualified by Verstappen to the tune of 0.089s, reckoned he didn’t tune into that as well as he might have done. In Q2 he’d been 0.6s faster than Verstappen on the same medium tyre, but that came on the second of two runs on fresh mediums, whereas Verstappen did only his first run on those tyres and aborted a second Q2 lap on the softs.
1276943649

Verstappen was unable to make serious in-roads into Bottas' lead
Comparing just their first Q2 runs, the difference was only 0.1s – and Bottas then found a huge 0.7s chunk on his second run. It was clear already towards the end of Q2 that the track grip was increasing – or rather becoming less bad, for in the high temperatures it was low-grip all weekend. So the picture was less than clear at this point.
Verstappen though was not happy with the balance of the Red Bull on the low-grip surface. “I just couldn’t push on the entry to the corners,” he reported. On a track surface of around 37 degrees Celsius, the rears were tending to run too hot, especially in the 90-degree turns of the final sector. It seemed to be afflicting the Red Bull more than the Mercedes.

But into Q3 there was some cloud cover, the track temperature reduced seemingly by just enough, and suddenly everyone had a lot more grip. On the first runs, with everyone now on the soft compound, Bottas’ advantage over Verstappen was back to just 0.1s – and he trailed team mate Hamilton by a massive 0.8s. It’s not unusual for Hamilton to be quicker than Bottas – but not by that amount. “My tyres were too cold on the first run,” reported Valtteri.
Getting the fronts up to temperature for the start of the lap but not allowing the rears to be too hot by the end is a key part of the puzzle to a Sochi qualifying lap, but Bottas has proved his absolute mastery of this in the past. It seemed odd that he should have been struggling to such an extent.


2020 Russian GP Qualifying: Verstappen and Bottas' contrasting emotions
Verstappen by contrast was feeling more confident in the rear stability of the Red Bull as the track grip increased. With that as his new baseline, he was ready to properly attack on his final run. In what team boss Christian Horner reckoned was the best qualifying laphe’d ever seen Verstappen do, he found a huge 0.5s chunk on that final run.
That still left him 0.5s adrift of Hamilton’s final pole-setting effort, but crucially it was faster than Bottas by 0.1s. “I don’t know what happened on that second run,” said Bottas afterwards. “The lap felt better, there weren't really any mistakes so I'm not sure why I couldn't get closer to pole. There are some question marks there.”
This did seem most odd. Here was Bottas a full 0.652s slower than Hamilton, by far the biggest deficit of his season – around a track where he has historically held the edge over Hamilton. That 0.652s represented a shortfall of 0.71% to Hamilton, way bigger than at any other track this year and around what is historically his best track. His average in the season to date is just 0.2% slower. Verstappen certainly over-delivered with that front row, but Bottas most definitely under-delivered – and for reasons he couldn’t seem to explain.
READ MORE: 'Maybe I was playing games and wanted third...' - Bottas optimistic about Russia chances, despite 2nd-row start
Perhaps the clue was in what he said next. “But P3 is actually a pretty good place to start here and I think I'm on the right tyre as well. I've started third here before and look what happened, so I'll try and do the same. It's still all to play for.” He was referencing his 2017 victory here, when he vaulted from third on the grid to slipstream past the Ferraris into a lead he would never lose.
1276793590

Bottas didn't appear too worried after qualifying third
It’s true that the Sochi polesitter is always extremely vulnerable in the long run down to Turn 2 at the start. The slipstreaming effect is massive. Pole is not the best starting position here. It gives you the clean side of the grid – and Hamilton’s start was hugely better than Verstappen’s on the dirty side – but makes you a sitting duck down the long straight, usually to whomever has qualified third.

Third is probably the best grid spot here, giving you both the cleaner tarmac and the slipstream. Even second – with the potential slipstream but poor traction – is often better than pole, as the slipstream is more powerful than the difference in acceleration off the line. Pole is probably the third-best option! It would of course be impossible to pre-judge how to qualify third. But was Bottas possibly not trying too hard to set pole? Only he can know that.
As it happened, Hamilton’s soft tyres gave him a big enough advantage over Bottas’ mediums at the start that he was just about able to fend off the other Mercedes into Turn 2 – but it was close. Despite an initial advantage off the line of about two car lengths for Hamilton, they rounded Turn 2 side-by-side.
Without the extra tyre grip from the soft compound tyre he’d been forced to get through Q2 on, Hamilton would likely have been passed by Bottas at this point. Even with the traction disadvantage, Bottas reckoned he still might have made it past were it not for a “huge wasp or something that splattered my visor just as I was picking out the braking point. That’s why I ran a bit too deep.”
He wasn’t too deterred though. Those mediums were going to give him a much longer opening stint than Hamilton and that was going to be the key, even before Hamilton’s 10s penalty was confirmed.
So what about Verstappen? He was never a threat. The Mercedes reverted to being much the quicker car. The track temperatures were higher even than on Saturday – and that definitely didn’t help the Red Bull, especially in the first stint on the medium tyres.
READ MORE: Hamilton says 'it feels like we're fighting uphill' as he lashes out at 'ridiculous' penalties
“It was a bit like in Q1 and Q2,” reported Max afterwards, “where I just couldn’t push the entries of the corners and I couldn’t keep up with them. So I just tried to not lose too much time. Then once we pitted, I put the hard tyres on, and everything was a bit more stable and a bit better balanced.”
But Bottas was 10s up the road by then on his way to a perfect victory.
 

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Discussion Starter #336

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Discussion Starter #337

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Discussion Starter #338
RACEFANS
Honda, Circuit de CatalunyaWhy Honda’s fourth F1 departure is different – and what it says about the sport
2020 F1 season
2nd October 2020
by
Keith Collantine

It may be tempting to regard Honda’s fourth departure from Formula 1, announced this morning, as yet another example of a capricious car manufacturer coming and going as it pleases.


But this is not like Honda’s 1992 departure when they were flushed with success, the trophy cabinet groaning with championship and race silverware accumulated with McLaren and Williams. Nor is this the same as when they quit at the end of unsuccessful spells in 1968 and 2008.

The Japanese manufacturer did not have a smooth return to F1 five years ago with McLaren. But following its 2019 tie-up with Red Bull, Honda had reasons to feel positive about its F1 future. The partnership won three races last year, and another this year.
Most unexpectedly, Honda delivered the feel-good story of the 2020 season to date with Pierre Gasly’s extraordinary triumph for AlphaTauri at Monza.
“We are very happy with Gasly’s Monza win,” said Honda’s technical director Toyoharu Tanabe in Sochi last week. “It emphasised very much our passion. Japanese fans were very happy to see his win and his podium.” Today’s news puts the real-world value of that victory in a depressing context.

Honda, 1968Honda canned its first F1 team in 1968…Since F1 introduced its V6 hybrid turbo power unit rules in 2014, Honda is the only new manufacturer to have entered the sport. It is now leaving despite knowing the current technical rules will remain stable until 2025.

Significantly, Honda’s 427-word statement confirming their departure does not contain a single mention of ‘Covid’ or ‘Coronavirus’. They are not hiding behind the pandemic.
Instead they made it clear they are leaving F1 in order to plough development into green technologies. “Honda has decided to strive for the ‘realisation of carbon neutrality by 2050,'” it stated on Friday. “This goal will be pursued as part of Honda’s environmental initiatives which is one of the top priorities of Honda as a mobility manufacturer.
“Toward this end, Honda needs to funnel its corporate resources in research and development into the areas of future power unit and energy technologies, including fuel cell vehicle (FCV) and battery EV (BEV) technologies, which will be the core of carbon-free technologies.
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Ayrton Senna, McLaren, Spa-Francorchamps, 1992…left again in 1992 after success with McLaren…“As a part of this move, in April of this year, Honda created a new centre called Innovative Research Excellence, Power Unit and Energy. Honda will allocate its energy management and fuel technologies as well as knowledge amassed through F1 activities to this area of power unit and energy technologies and take initiatives while focusing on the future realisation of carbon neutrality. Toward this end, Honda made the decision to conclude its participation in F1.”

F1’s switch to V6 hybrid turbo engines in 2014 was supposed to court new engine manufacturers by offering them the chance to develop cutting-edge hybrid technologies in a racing environment. Now the only new manufacturer which came to the sport following the change is leaving, in order to pursue other technologies.
While F1 is locked into its current engine formula until 2025, discussions will surely now turn to whether those technologies should form part of its future engine rules.
Honda’s exit is a blow for F1, just weeks after its 10 teams confirmed they had signed up to the new Concorde Agreement keeping them in the sport. It will trim the engine manufacturer contingent to just three – a worryingly slim number.

Rubens Barrichello, Honda, Interlagos, 2008…and last quit the sport in 2008Honda is unique among the current four manufacturers in that it is only a power unit supplier, not a complete chassis builder. Therefore their exit will not immediately reduce F1’s stubbornly low car count of 20.

But it leaves a question mark over who will power Red Bull and AlphaTauri after next year. And it is likely to compromise the threat posed by the closest rivals to the dominant Mercedes.
Worst of all for F1 is the possibility that if one car manufacturer leaves, others may follow. After the 10th race of 2020, and in only the second season of their partnership, Red Bull-Honda are second in the constructors’ championship. Despite this promise, Honda has decided to can its Formula 1 programme.
That is a grim reflection of how little success in the sport means in the face of changing boardroom priorities.
 

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Discussion Starter #340
:(
AUTOSPORT
FIA preparing "back-up plans" to ensure F1 Eifel GP action


Formula 1 race director Michael Masi says "back-up plans" are being formulated in order to ensure that the cars can run at the Nurburgring on Saturday.

On a damp and foggy day Friday's action at the Eifel Grand Prix was lost because the medical helicopter could not leave the track and land safely at the designated hospitals in the Koblenz area.
FP1 did not start on time, and bulletins were issued at 30-minute intervals until it was announced that the session would not start. The same pattern was repeated in FP2, and the day ended with no cars taking to the track.
At some venues cars can run without medical helicopter cover if what are known as "receiving" hospitals can be reached by road within a 20 minute window, but that is not the case at the Nurburgring, so today the FIA had no option but to cancel track running.
Better weather conditions are expected tomorrow, but the FIA is hoping to ensure that poor visibility won't wipe out the day's action.
"We're hoping that the fog will lift," said Masi. "We've seen it coming in and out all day, so we've been operating on the 30-minute interval with updates, working with local air traffic control, with the helicopter pilot, for the medical helicopter.
"The weather and dampness is fine. It's just the medical helicopter is not able to fly to the receiving hospitals due to fog, so even though we have the broadcast helicopter that's flying only around the circuit, to go from here to any of the hospitals, should something happen, it's not possible.
"And therefore from a safety perspective, we would not start the session."

Looking ahead to Saturday Masi said: "The forecast looks better, but we're also working on some back-up plans should we have a similar situation, to be able to try and work around.
"We're working on those as we speak. We'll work on the back-up plans and then advise everyone accordingly at the same time."
Masi would not be drawn on what the plans are, but in similar circumstances at the 2017 Chinese GP a hospital closer to the circuit - and within the 20 minute window of being reached by road - was upgraded by bringing in the neurological equipment that FIA protocols require.
The timing of medical evacuation is covered by Appendix H of the International Sporting Code, which states: "With the exception of a direct transfer to a severe burns treatment centre, the flight time necessary to reach each of the hospitals mentioned in the medical questionnaire for the competition and approved by the FIA medical delegate must not, in normal conditions, exceed approximately 20 minutes."
 
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