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Discussion Starter #221
Yes! Great results. :)

Think the 2020 PU development freeze is bad for Honda and Ferrari though.;)
 

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Discussion Starter #222
Two races, four top-tens, two fastest laps, second in WCC, third in WDC - we'll take that!
MUST-SEE: Incredible final lap battle ends in photo finish
 

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Discussion Starter #223
Formula 1
How one key Red Bull-Honda deficit blunted Verstappen’s challenge to Mercedes

F1xEDP - MMD STYRIA.jpg

Lewis Hamilton’s Styrian Grand Prix victory was based around his resounding wet weather pole position and his dominant pace advantage on race day. It was one of those rare victories that didn’t really need the pre-race strategy to be adjusted for the actual circumstances of the race.
He pitted a little earlier than planned because he was about to begin lapping traffic which would have delayed him and allowed the vaguely in touch Max Verstappen behind to reduce the gap. But such was his margin, that was a luxury comfortably afforded.
This was purely about a pace advantage, Hamilton acknowledging that he was taking only as much from his tyres as was necessary. It could have been a more dominant victory even than the half-minute winning margin over Verstappen’s third-place Red Bull suggested.
READ MORE: Styrian GP victory ‘a great way to bounce back’ after opening weekend struggles, says Hamilton

Furthermore, Mercedes used their greater pace to allow Valtteri Bottas to apply undercut pressure on the Red Bull, forcing it to stop earlier than ideal, with Bottas then running 10 laps longer so as to have a big tyre advantage over the Red Bull in the second stint. He would use this grip advantage to pass the by-then struggling Verstappen, further handicapped by front wing and barge board damage inflicted over the Turn 7 kerbing.
Styrian Grand Prix: Verstappen and Bottas fight for second place
How was this Mercedes advantage derived? It was partly circuit-specific. The Red Bull Ring is very demanding of the ERS system over its short lap. There are three flat-out sections and not many corners in which to capture braking energy. So it is one of the few tracks on the calendar (along with Baku and Spa) where the ERS cannot deploy on demand for the full lap. At some point it will begin clipping its deployment and the car will be denied the extra 160bhp boost.
READ MORE: Red Bull 'just too slow' to stop Mercedes in Austria, says Verstappen
But the Honda system is less efficient than that of Mercedes. So the Merc will keep accelerating even as the Red Bull hits that brick wall as the power is clipped. As they crossed the start/finish line, the Merc was hitting 180mph, the Red Bull not far behind at 178mph.
But between there and the speed trap further up the road, the Honda’s deployment would cut – and the Merc passed the timing beam there at 198mph, the Red Bull just 191. This ERS difference will not be a factor at most of the other circuits we visit.
But that one issue had further ramifications here. The high-rake Red Bull, which derives a particularly high proportion of its downforce from the underbody, habitually runs less wing than the low-rake Mercedes. That was so again here, but by a greater degree than usual as Red Bull tried to mitigate against the effects of that ERS shortfall.
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The clipping on Verstappen's Red Bull meant third place was almost an inevitability
Running less downforce, the Red Bull’s tyre degradation was greater – and this (together with Verstappen’s aero damage) played its part in how easily Bottas was able to catch him even after being delayed by backmarkers.
Mercedes’ engine advantage here was such that it could carry more wing and still be faster on the straights. The only place the Red Bull was slightly faster was through the low-speed Turns 3 and 4, though it was only slightly slower through the fast sweeps of the middle sector.
Styria Facts & Stats: Hamilton now just 6 wins shy of Schumacher record
Red Bull might have been able to compete with the Merc had the weather been as hot as during Friday practice when the track temperature, at 53 degrees, was around 20 degrees C higher than it would be on race day. Then, the Merc was saturating the soft compound tyre and overheating it. Verstappen lapped quicker than either of the Mercs in Friday’s second practice session and was having no such problems.
But the weather gods, having had their fun with the rain of qualifying, didn’t do anything too extreme on Sunday, allowing the inherent advantage of the Mercedes, amplified by the circuit traits, to play out in the natural order.

 

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Discussion Starter #224
McLaren
McLaren MCL35 chassis front

McLaren MCL35 chassis front
Photo by: Giorgio Piola

McLaren continues to impress, with the MCL35 proving to be even handier than perhaps the team imagined, relative to its competitors. This illustration above highlights a novel solution, as the team uses a triangular-shaped chin spoiler beneath the chassis that undoubtedly helps to guide the airflow toward its intended target.

McLaren MCL35 floor detail

McLaren MCL35 floor detail
Photo by: Giorgio Piola

McLaren MCL35 engine cover detail

McLaren MCL35 engine cover detail Photo by: Mark Sutton

The team also used some Free Practice time at the second race in Austria to test out some experimental parts and cooling solutions it’ll use in Hungary. The image (above left) shows the new floor solution trialled by McLaren, which is similar to the one run by Ferrari, with a flap mounted above the floor ahead of the rear tyre which connects to the vertical floor strake.

With temperatures expected to have an impact on performance in Hungary, the team evaluated a solution we’ve seen from previous years, whereby a flap is placed on the trailing edge of the cooling outlet to act much like a Gurney flap to extract heat from the outlet beneath.
 

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Discussion Starter #225
AUTOSPORT.COM
Why Aston Martin's F1 project is no longer a gamble for Vettel


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Racing Point's sudden surge in its competitiveness has drawn controversy, but it may also tempt a four-time Formula 1 champion to join its ranks in 2021, says JONATHAN NOBLE

They say a week in politics is a long time, but in Formula 1 it can be an eternity in the way it can completely change the grand prix landscape.
Perceptions change very quickly in the sport, and perhaps the biggest shift from the Austrian Grand Prix to the Styrian Grand Prix last weekend was the reality of just how quick Racing Point can be.
A hesitant first weekend out with its 'Pink Mercedes' left rivals convinced it had made a good step, but it was only in the second Red Bull Ring race that the reality of its pace began to bite.
Red Bull admitted that all teams should now be "worried", Renault lodged its protest and the Silverstone team itself warned of even better things to come.


But the impact of that performance could extend wider, with it potentially being the catalyst for perhaps the biggest shock of F1's surprising 2020 driver market: Sebastian Vettel to join Aston Martin.
Where once such a prospect seemed extremely fanciful, with Vettel clear about the qualities he wanted from any team he would consider joining, now it suddenly makes a lot of sense.

In fact, what is key here is that this is not Racing Point trying to convince Vettel about how good its car might be in the next few years.
Instead, the way F1's rules have been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic, means that it can already show what next year's car will be like.
With minimal changes allowed for development into 2021, the chances of there being a huge shuffle in the order over the next 18 months are pretty remote. What's quick now should still be quick next year.


Furthermore, the overhaul for 2022 - with the budget cap biting the top teams as they work out how to trim back on spending - could prove a distraction for the top boys, and allow some of the flush midfield outfits a chance to make some headway.
"I think Racing Point made a very strong impression, and are certainly in a good place for this year. It's obviously a good opportunity for them this year" Sebastian Vettel
Speaking last week about his thought process on a potential deal with Racing Point, Vettel was certainly leaving the door wide open.
"I don't know yet what is going to happen," he said. "The race is now extremely important for myself, and then we will see in the next couple of weeks, months what is happening, what opportunities there might be, etc.
"Independent from that, I think Racing Point made a very strong impression, and are certainly in a good place for this year.
"I know part of the team, I know some members of the team quite well from my past and for a long time. It's obviously a good opportunity for them this year to have a good car to fight with and try and improve from there."

Vettel's mood in his public statements over recent weeks has been one of making clear that the decision not to extend his contract with Ferrari was not anything to do with him not wishing to carry on.
His comments emphasising that it was Ferrari who unilaterally pulled the plug on their time togetherwas all about positioning himself as someone hungry to stay racing.
Were he resigned to it all, miserable about F1, and tired of the travel and commitment, then he would likely have kept things quiet and accepted a year off.
That he made clear his unhappiness about it all was a clear message of his motivation and how much he wants to carry on.
Vette was emphatic before the first Austria race on that point, and that the 'right package' for him would convince him to stay.
"I think I have a very competitive nature," he said. "I've achieved a lot in the sport and I'm motivated and willing to achieve more. To do so, I think, I need the right package, and the right people around me. So that's what I'm looking out for at the moment.
"If the right opportunity should arise, then I think it is quite clear. If that's not the case, then I probably have to look out for something else."
Could Aston Martin be the right package?

The car itself certainly seems quick enough - faster than the current Ferrari right now - and knowing that there is the carry over into 2021, will be encouraging.
However, it is inevitable that Vettel will be keeping one eye on the outcome of the Renault protest - if the FIA rule that the team has broken the rules in copying the Mercedes brake ducts then it could have wider implications for the rest of the car.
Another important factor is its engine, with a move to the team a chance for Vettel to enter the Mercedes family.
Perhaps most intriguing about the entire scenario though is which of the two drivers in Racing Point's current employ would be moved aside
Sure, the connection won't be as strong as if he raced for the works team, but the ties are there - and it puts him inside a pool that could be considered for the world champion team if Bottas or Lewis Hamilton left.
The ambitious plan for Aston Martin's future, with Lawrence Stroll clearly investing a lot of time into the project, is also one that could give Vettel the platform he needs - leading a car company's venture and having around him a team that is happy to focus on him. They can build something together.
Vettel has never been stronger than when he has felt loved and appreciated; and in Aston Martin he could rediscover that feeling he had in his early Red Bull and Ferrari days.
Perhaps most intriguing about the entire scenario though is which of the two drivers in Racing Point's current employ would be moved aside.

The most obvious candidate is Sergio Perez, who is understood to have a break clause in his contract that would allow Racing Point to slot in Vettel instead.
That may seem pretty harsh considering how loyal Perez has been the team, and the role he played in helping keep it alive back in 2018 when Force India was close to collapse, but F1 can be a ruthless game at times.
Let's not forget also the pretty hefty sponsorship backing that Perez brings with him: something that will not be so easy to replace.
But equally Racing Point's management must be aware that a line-up of Vettel and Perez is a stronger combination than Vettel and Stroll, and one that could be the difference between fighting for top three in the constructors' and ending up in the top five.
Could the unthinkable happen and the team actually stand Stroll down into a different role? It's hard to believe that it would, but in F1, not much is impossible.
The ball is now very much in Vettel's court, with a decision effectively needed before F1 reconvenes at Silverstone for the British Grand Prix.
And where just a few weeks ago signing for Racing Point would have appeared to be the gamble of his life, right now it could well be one of the smartest moves he has ever made.


 

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Discussion Starter #227
the-race.com
FERRARI RACING TO CHANGE 2021 ENGINE AROUND FIA DIRECTIVES
By Mark Hughes
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Ferrari is in a race against time to develop an updated power unit for the 2021 Formula 1 season that it hopes will get around the limitations of the current engine under the technical regulations as interpreted by the recent extra directives regarding fuel flow, ERS distribution and oil burn.
The existing engine package – which last year displayed a significant power advantage over the field – has been rendered uncompetitive by these directives, with particular regard to fuel flow.
The ability for Ferrari to run powerful qualifying modes has been severely limited – as was evidenced by the lack of step-up in pace from Q1 into Q2 and Q3 in the dry qualifying for the Austrian Grand Prix.
Analysis of the GPS data provided to the teams by the FIA suggested that in Q3 there, the Ferrari was the least powerful of the four engine makes and as much as 50bhp behind the Mercedes. In race trim, the deficit was smaller but still present.
Sebastian Vettel Ferrari Austrian Grand Prix 2020

Running the engines with a leaner fuel mixture is part of a mix of strategies used to create a qualifying mode. This creates extra heat and it is believed that Ferrari’s previous interpretation of the fuel flow limit made it possible to use enough extra fuel to absorb much of this extra heat.

Ferrari defiant amid new push for engine settlement release
Read more

A greater fuel flow brings not just power gains, but the extra heat-absorbing properties also allow a lower cooling capacity, with implications of radiator capacity and the aerodynamic impact of cooling inlets and outlets for them.
Without the facility to increase the fuel flow, even for a short period, that advantage has disappeared.
Among the Ferrari modifications expected to debut at Silverstone next month are a rearrangement of the radiator layout, to give a more efficient cooling/aero trade-off for the characteristics of the engine as it is now rather than how it was.
The post-pandemic increased restrictions placed upon power unit updates have hit Ferrari particularly hard.

Renault and Ferrari explain lack of engine upgrades
Read more

Only a restricted number of reliability changes are now allowed during 2020. Wider changes of specification were only permitted before the season-opener. Mercedes and Honda took advantage of this but Ferrari and Renault did not.
For next year performance updates can be made, with a decreasing number of changes allowed across that season and 2022 before engines are frozen for 2023 and ’24.
The vital update is therefore that for 2021 and Ferrari has been prioritising this since Barcelona testing revealed the team’s worst fears about how adversely the new directives had impacted upon the existing power unit.
 

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Discussion Starter #228 (Edited)
RACEFANS
McLaren’s practice pace “a bit of a shock” admits concerned Norris
2020 Hungarian Grand Prix
17th July 2020,
by Keith Collantine

Lando Norris believes McLaren face a tougher weekend in Hungary than they did at the previous two races in Austria based on the team’s practice pace today.

Having finished the first two races in the top 10, Norris was only ninth-quickest in Friday’s only dry session, planing McLaren sixth out of the 10 teams.

“It was quite tricky,” said Norris. “I think we’re in a very different situation to Austria in terms of car balance and what we’re suffering with.
“A bit of a shock, I would say. Last year this was quite a good track for us. But after the feeling this morning it was not looking quite as good.
“So we’ve got some work to do if it’s going to be dry. I think it’s going to be wet it’s hard to say, no one really did any proper running. It just kind of sucks. It’s nice to be back in the car but we’ve got a bit of homework to do.”
McLaren suspected the Hungaroring wouldn’t be as strong a circuit for them as the Red Bull Ring was, said Norris.
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“There’s just so many things in Formula 1 which can affect different things,” he said. “The types of corners we have here are very different, a lot more slow speed, medium speed but also a lot tighter than what we had in Austria.
“The Tarmac difference, there’s so many variables. Obviously the set-up is very different – not that different, even, slightly. So we weren’t expecting it to be that different, but we knew, of course, it was going to be different.
“I think we just highlighted a few more of our weaknesses which we were expecting, but maybe not expecting them to be as visible as what they were this morning.”
The team’s closest rivals appear to be in better shape this weekend, Norris added.
“It’s not terrible but I think looking at the times everyone is kind of more in a place which we were expecting with the Renault being extremely quick, quite a bit quicker than us, Racing Point being where they should be, Ferrari being back where they should be. And Red Bull maybe not looking quite as good as what we thought but still being very quick.
“I think we’re still a bit in the unknown with what’s going to happen tomorrow on weather and conditions and everything. So it’s all to play for, it doesn’t mean we’re not looking good or anything. I think we can make some progress and then go again tomorrow.”

 

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RACEFANS
McLaren’s practice pace “a bit of a shock” admits concerned Norris
2020 Hungarian Grand Prix
17th July 2020,
by Keith Collantine

Lando Norris believes McLaren face a tougher weekend in Hungary than they did at the previous two races in Austria based on the team’s practice pace today.

Having finished the first two races in the top 10, Norris was only ninth-quickest in Friday’s only dry session, planing McLaren sixth out of the 10 teams.

“It was quite tricky,” said Norris. “I think we’re in a very different situation to Austria in terms of car balance and what we’re suffering with.
“A bit of a shock, I would say. Last year this was quite a good track for us. But after the feeling this morning it was not looking quite as good.
“So we’ve got some work to do if it’s going to be dry. I think it’s going to be wet it’s hard to say, no one really did any proper running. It just kind of sucks. It’s nice to be back in the car but we’ve got a bit of homework to do.”
McLaren suspected the Hungaroring wouldn’t be as strong a circuit for them as the Red Bull Ring was, said Norris.
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“There’s just so many things in Formula 1 which can affect different things,” he said. “The types of corners we have here are very different, a lot more slow speed, medium speed but also a lot tighter than what we had in Austria.
“The Tarmac difference, there’s so many variables. Obviously the set-up is very different – not that different, even, slightly. So we weren’t expecting it to be that different, but we knew, of course, it was going to be different.
“I think we just highlighted a few more of our weaknesses which we were expecting, but maybe not expecting them to be as visible as what they were this morning.”
The team’s closest rivals appear to be in better shape this weekend, Norris added.
“It’s not terrible but I think looking at the times everyone is kind of more in a place which we were expecting with the Renault being extremely quick, quite a bit quicker than us, Racing Point being where they should be, Ferrari being back where they should be. And Red Bull maybe not looking quite as good as what we thought but still being very quick.
“I think we’re still a bit in the unknown with what’s going to happen tomorrow on weather and conditions and everything. So it’s all to play for, it doesn’t mean we’re not looking good or anything. I think we can make some progress and then go again tomorrow.”

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I quite like Lando, but if anyone can translate this into English, it would be appreciated:

"Obviously the set-up is very different – not that different, even, slightly. So we weren’t expecting it to be that different, but we knew, of course, it was going to be different."

🤔
 

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Discussion Starter #230
I quite like Lando, but if anyone can translate this into English, it would be appreciated:

"Obviously the set-up is very different – not that different, even, slightly. So we weren’t expecting it to be that different, but we knew, of course, it was going to be different."

🤔
Yes. He seems to be uncomfortable with many small things related to the car feeling/handling/power on this track. His bumbling language maybe an attempt to not offend the team and management with criticism? ;)
 

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Yes. He seems to be uncomfortable with many small things related to the car feeling/handling/power on this track. His bumbling language maybe an attempt to not offend the team and management with criticism? ;)
If you spent your high school years racing cars instead of reading, writing, and studying, you probably would not be especially well-spoken. That's okay - there are already more great orators than there are great racing drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter #232
MOTORSPORTWEEK

Hamilton leads Mercedes 1-2 in Hungary qualifying, Stroll third
by Phillip Horton
July 18, 2020
Hamilton leads Mercedes 1-2 in Hungary qualifying, Stroll third
Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Mercedes AMG F1 W11. Hungarian Grand Prix, Saturday 18th July 2020. Budapest, Hungary.


Lewis Hamilton claimed the 90th pole position of his Formula 1 career as Mercedes dominated proceedings during qualifying for the Hungarian Grand Prix.
Rain threatened throughout the three-part qualifying hour but never materialised, enabling Mercedes to control the session at the top of the timesheets.
Hamilton set a provisional track record on Medium tyres in Q2 as both Mercedes drivers made it through the second session on the yellow-banded compound.

He then lowered the track record twice in Q3 and wound up with a time of 1:13.447, with Valtteri Bottas making it an all-Mercedes front row, 0.107s behind.

FIA happy RP20 design is ours after factory visit – Racing Point
Racing Point impresses again
Racing Point once again demonstrated the pace of its RP20 as the team was second-best for much of the session.
The squad even had sufficient confidence to make it through Q2 on the Medium tyres, giving it a further advantage in race trim.

When it came to Q3 Lance Stroll edged Sergio Perez to take third spot on a circuit where the team failed to make it out of Q1 12 months ago.
But even then Mercedes’ advantage was such that Stroll was 0.930s down on pole man Hamilton.
Ferrari better, Red Bull all at sea
Ferrari had its best result of the season in terms of one-lap pace but given previous struggles that was a low benchmark.
Sebastian Vettel and Charles Leclerc will line up alongside each other on the third row of the grid but part of Ferrari’s improved position was thanks to Red Bull’s struggles.
At a circuit where he claimed his maiden pole position Max Verstappen could manage only seventh, with his year-on-year pace worse, amid ongoing strife with the RB16.

Team-mate Alexander Albon qualified only 13th as he in particular struggled through low-speed corners.
McLaren captured another double Q3 spot, with Lando Norris and Carlos Sainz Jr. eighth and ninth, while Pierre Gasly made it through to the top 10 but did not run owing to a suspected power unit issue.
Williams secures double Q2 berth
A week after George Russell secured Williams its first Q2 spot since 2018 the team had both cars in the second segment of qualifying at the Hungaroring.
Russell secured an excellent 12th on the grid, just two-tenths away from Q3, while Nicholas Latifi joined his team-mate in the session, finishing 15th.
It marked Latifi’s first Q2 appearance in only his third attempt.
Renault off the pace
While there was joy for Williams at having both cars in Q2 a similar outcome was not so enthusiastically met by Renault.
In a tight midfield battle it lost out, with Daniel Ricciardo 11th after a mistake through the final corner, while Esteban Ocon was only 14th.
Ferrari customers struggle again
For the third event in succession Ferrari’s customer teams again lacked pace in qualifying.
Neither Haas driver nor Alfa Romeo racer made it beyond the first knockout phase.
Kevin Magnussen came closest, 0.047s behind Latifi, with AlphaTauri’s Daniil Kvyat the only interloper among the Ferrari-powered cars at the back.
Romain Grosjean was 18th while Antonio Giovinazzi and Kimi Raikkonen were at the back, as Alfa Romeo finished qualifying as the slowest team for the third race in succession.
#DriverTeamTimeGap
1L. HamiltonMercedes1:13.447
2V. BottasMercedes1:13.554
3L. StrollRacing Point1:14.377
4S. PerezRacing Point1:14.545
5S. VettelFerrari1:14.774
6C. LeclercFerrari1:14.817
7M. VerstappenRed Bull1:14.849
8L. NorrisMcLaren1:14.966
9C. SainzMcLaren1:15.027
10P. GaslyAlphaTauri1:15.267
11D. RicciardoRenault1:15.661
12G. RussellWilliams1:15.698
13A. AlbonRed Bull1:15.715
14E. OconRenault1:15.742
15N. LatifiWilliams1:16.544
16K. MagnussenHaas1:16.152
17D. KvyatAlphaTauri1:16.204
18R. GrosjeanHaas1:16.407
19A. GiovinazziAlfa Romeo1:16.506
20K. RaikkonenAlfa Romeo1:16.614

 

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MOTORSPORTWEEK

Hamilton leads Mercedes 1-2 in Hungary qualifying, Stroll third
by Phillip Horton
July 18, 2020
Hamilton leads Mercedes 1-2 in Hungary qualifying, Stroll third
Lewis Hamilton (GBR) Mercedes AMG F1 W11. Hungarian Grand Prix, Saturday 18th July 2020. Budapest, Hungary.


Lewis Hamilton claimed the 90th pole position of his Formula 1 career as Mercedes dominated proceedings during qualifying for the Hungarian Grand Prix.
Rain threatened throughout the three-part qualifying hour but never materialised, enabling Mercedes to control the session at the top of the timesheets.
Hamilton set a provisional track record on Medium tyres in Q2 as both Mercedes drivers made it through the second session on the yellow-banded compound.

He then lowered the track record twice in Q3 and wound up with a time of 1:13.447, with Valtteri Bottas making it an all-Mercedes front row, 0.107s behind.

FIA happy RP20 design is ours after factory visit – Racing Point
Racing Point impresses again
Racing Point once again demonstrated the pace of its RP20 as the team was second-best for much of the session.
The squad even had sufficient confidence to make it through Q2 on the Medium tyres, giving it a further advantage in race trim.

When it came to Q3 Lance Stroll edged Sergio Perez to take third spot on a circuit where the team failed to make it out of Q1 12 months ago.
But even then Mercedes’ advantage was such that Stroll was 0.930s down on pole man Hamilton.
Ferrari better, Red Bull all at sea
Ferrari had its best result of the season in terms of one-lap pace but given previous struggles that was a low benchmark.
Sebastian Vettel and Charles Leclerc will line up alongside each other on the third row of the grid but part of Ferrari’s improved position was thanks to Red Bull’s struggles.
At a circuit where he claimed his maiden pole position Max Verstappen could manage only seventh, with his year-on-year pace worse, amid ongoing strife with the RB16.

Team-mate Alexander Albon qualified only 13th as he in particular struggled through low-speed corners.
McLaren captured another double Q3 spot, with Lando Norris and Carlos Sainz Jr. eighth and ninth, while Pierre Gasly made it through to the top 10 but did not run owing to a suspected power unit issue.
Williams secures double Q2 berth
A week after George Russell secured Williams its first Q2 spot since 2018 the team had both cars in the second segment of qualifying at the Hungaroring.
Russell secured an excellent 12th on the grid, just two-tenths away from Q3, while Nicholas Latifi joined his team-mate in the session, finishing 15th.
It marked Latifi’s first Q2 appearance in only his third attempt.
Renault off the pace
While there was joy for Williams at having both cars in Q2 a similar outcome was not so enthusiastically met by Renault.
In a tight midfield battle it lost out, with Daniel Ricciardo 11th after a mistake through the final corner, while Esteban Ocon was only 14th.
Ferrari customers struggle again
For the third event in succession Ferrari’s customer teams again lacked pace in qualifying.
Neither Haas driver nor Alfa Romeo racer made it beyond the first knockout phase.
Kevin Magnussen came closest, 0.047s behind Latifi, with AlphaTauri’s Daniil Kvyat the only interloper among the Ferrari-powered cars at the back.
Romain Grosjean was 18th while Antonio Giovinazzi and Kimi Raikkonen were at the back, as Alfa Romeo finished qualifying as the slowest team for the third race in succession.
#DriverTeamTimeGap
1L. HamiltonMercedes1:13.447
2V. BottasMercedes1:13.554
3L. StrollRacing Point1:14.377
4S. PerezRacing Point1:14.545
5S. VettelFerrari1:14.774
6C. LeclercFerrari1:14.817
7M. VerstappenRed Bull1:14.849
8L. NorrisMcLaren1:14.966
9C. SainzMcLaren1:15.027
10P. GaslyAlphaTauri1:15.267
11D. RicciardoRenault1:15.661
12G. RussellWilliams1:15.698
13A. AlbonRed Bull1:15.715
14E. OconRenault1:15.742
15N. LatifiWilliams1:16.544
16K. MagnussenHaas1:16.152
17D. KvyatAlphaTauri1:16.204
18R. GrosjeanHaas1:16.407
19A. GiovinazziAlfa Romeo1:16.506
20K. RaikkonenAlfa Romeo1:16.614

It's a pity that those spineless worms at Pointless Racing qualified on the second row (or qualified at all, come to that) in their W10s. One can only hope that they take each other out at the first turn of L1 and don't pollute the race any more than necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #234
AUTOSPORT
Brawn: Racing Point F1 protest "tricky problem" for FIA to resolve


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Formula 1 managing director of motorsport Ross Brawn believes the current protest against Racing Point will be a "tricky problem" for the FIA to resolve.

Racing Point is currently facing scrutiny over the legality over its RP20 car following protests by Renault at each of the last two races.
Racing Point has openly admitted it based the design of its car on the 2019 Mercedes W10 by using photographs, but stresses it remains within the regulations.
Writing in his post-race column, Brawn explained how copying other teams was "standard" in F1, having previously done so himself in his time as a team technical chief.
"My view is copying in Formula 1 is standard," Brawn said.
"Every team has, in normal times, digital photographers in the pit lane out there taking thousands of photos of every car for analysis, with a view of copying the best ideas. We used to give our photographers a shopping list.
PLUS: Why F1 has always been a "copying championship"
"Racing Point have just taken it to the next stage and done a more thorough job. There is not a single team in this paddock which has not copied something from another.
"I'd ask every Technical Director in the paddock to raise their hand if they haven't copied someone else. You won't see any hands. I have certainly copied others."

Renault's protest against Racing Point has focused on the brake ducts used on the RP20 car, which is argues has copied the Mercedes design.
Racing Point was permitted to use the 2019 Mercedes brake ducts last year when they were a listed part, but then had to design its own version for this year after a change in the rules.
Team principal Otmar Szafnauer said over the weekend it was "impossible" for the brake ducts to be illegal, and that he has "no concerns whatsoever" over their legality.
Brawn said that it could be difficult for the Racing Point designers to dismiss any knowledge they had of the Mercedes part when making their own version.
"Last year, Racing Point had access to, and could use, 2019-spec Mercedes brake ducts because they were not a listed part. This year, brake ducts are listed parts, so you have to design your own," Brawn explained.
"However, Racing Point cannot forget the knowledge they acquired using the 2019 Mercedes brake ducts.
"I think it is illogical to think they can wipe their memory banks. It is a tricky problem and one for the FIA experts to resolve."
The FIA is set to rule on the matter ahead of next week's British Grand Prix.
 

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AUTOSPORT
Brawn: Racing Point F1 protest "tricky problem" for FIA to resolve


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Formula 1 managing director of motorsport Ross Brawn believes the current protest against Racing Point will be a "tricky problem" for the FIA to resolve.

Racing Point is currently facing scrutiny over the legality over its RP20 car following protests by Renault at each of the last two races.
Racing Point has openly admitted it based the design of its car on the 2019 Mercedes W10 by using photographs, but stresses it remains within the regulations.
Writing in his post-race column, Brawn explained how copying other teams was "standard" in F1, having previously done so himself in his time as a team technical chief.
"My view is copying in Formula 1 is standard," Brawn said.
"Every team has, in normal times, digital photographers in the pit lane out there taking thousands of photos of every car for analysis, with a view of copying the best ideas. We used to give our photographers a shopping list.
PLUS: Why F1 has always been a "copying championship"
"Racing Point have just taken it to the next stage and done a more thorough job. There is not a single team in this paddock which has not copied something from another.
"I'd ask every Technical Director in the paddock to raise their hand if they haven't copied someone else. You won't see any hands. I have certainly copied others."

Renault's protest against Racing Point has focused on the brake ducts used on the RP20 car, which is argues has copied the Mercedes design.
Racing Point was permitted to use the 2019 Mercedes brake ducts last year when they were a listed part, but then had to design its own version for this year after a change in the rules.
Team principal Otmar Szafnauer said over the weekend it was "impossible" for the brake ducts to be illegal, and that he has "no concerns whatsoever" over their legality.
Brawn said that it could be difficult for the Racing Point designers to dismiss any knowledge they had of the Mercedes part when making their own version.
"Last year, Racing Point had access to, and could use, 2019-spec Mercedes brake ducts because they were not a listed part. This year, brake ducts are listed parts, so you have to design your own," Brawn explained.
"However, Racing Point cannot forget the knowledge they acquired using the 2019 Mercedes brake ducts.
"I think it is illogical to think they can wipe their memory banks. It is a tricky problem and one for the FIA experts to resolve."
The FIA is set to rule on the matter ahead of next week's British Grand Prix.
The critical difference is that, although teams will always try to improve their own cars by trying to adapt to them another team's insights or ideas for particular areas of the design, this is a (possibly unique) case of a team doing its best to copy an entire car. That is what makes the Pointless Racing car a sham 'Constructor's' entry, and why it should be banned. The sport has got enough challenges already without shameless clowns like these making a mockery of what is supposed to be the ultimate competition in racing car design.
 

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Discussion Starter #236
The critical difference is that, although teams will always try to improve their own cars by trying to adapt to them another team's insights or ideas for particular areas of the design, this is a (possibly unique) case of a team doing its best to copy an entire car. That is what makes the Pointless Racing car a sham 'Constructor's' entry, and why it should be banned. The sport has got enough challenges already without shameless clowns like these making a mockery of what is supposed to be the ultimate competition in racing car design.
Yes IIRC we had touched on this subject previously wrt cost caps and the probability that the major manufacturers would sponsor (own) clone team entries in F1. So this protest may bring some clarity.
 

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Yes IIRC we had touched on this subject previously wrt cost caps and the probability that the major manufacturers would sponsor (own) clone team entries in F1. So this protest may bring some clarity.
There is so much about this operation that smells, from Eddie Jordan (not exactly the straightest arrow in the quiver) to Midland to Spyker to Mallya and his scandal, then Stroll bought the team (in a transaction that another bidder called illegitimate) as a toy for his son. Then they painted the cars pink, cut a very questionable sponsorship deal with Aston-down-95%-in-a-year-Martin, then the Team Principal of Mercedes bought a stake in Aston Martin, and now they're running a copy of last year's Mercedes.
That's an awful lot of coincidences.
 

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Discussion Starter #238
MOTORSPORT.COM
Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis
TopicGiorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

F1 technical update: Mercedes, McLaren, AlphaTauri & Racing Point

F1 technical update: Mercedes, McLaren, AlphaTauri & Racing Point

By: Giorgio Piola
Co-author: Matthew Somerfield
Jul 20, 2020

In the ongoing development war between Formula 1’s teams, keep up to date with what’s new with our regular technical updates. Today, let’s look at four outfits at the Hungarian GP – Mercedes, McLaren, AlphaTauri and Racing Point.

Mercedes
The reliability gremlins that Mercedes faced in the first race of the season in Austria, caused by the vibrations from the kerbs, now seem like a distant memory after a flawless performance in Hungary.

The team was able to react positively and make changes for the Styrian GPthat reduced the possibility of any failures going forward. The issues that plagued the first race weekend were a consequence of the new rear suspension geometry, with the front leg of the lower wishbone placed higher than before and the rear leg (red arrow, main image above) placed much further back than usual.
The loads, vibrations and oscillations put through this novel arrangement is believed to have created ‘noise’ that interfered with the gearbox sensors.
To prevent a repeat of the situation the team made numerous alterations, including adding shielding and moving the wiring looms that were affected.
McLaren
204264

McLaren arrived at the Hungarian GP with a batch of updates (see video above) that it hoped would increase rear downforce and improve cooling. The parts, which had already been run during the pre-season test and during Free Practice in Austria, included a two-tier T-Wing and flaps above the cooling outlets respectively.
The T-Wings are connected to each other at the outboard end by a metal stay, which prevents them from moving around independently of one another and causing an aerodynamic flutter that would be damaging to the downforce and vortices they produce. The flap above the cooling outlet at the rear of the car acts much like a Gurney flap and will not only produce localized downforce but also help with extracting heat from the engine cover cooling outlet.

The team chose not to press another solution trialled at the Styrian GP into action. The flap, inset, mounted just above the floor and ahead of the rear tyre is similar to a solution we’ve seen Ferrari use this season, with both teams opting to mount the flap to the vertical strake alongside.
AlphaTauri
AlphaTauri AT01 t-wing

AlphaTauri AT01 t-wing
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
AlphaTauri continues to look for pockets of performance rather than follow the crowd, and at the rear of the AT01 it has a single rear wing support pillar and T-Wing.
Aside from Mercedes, which has two rear wing mounting variants, AlphaTauri is the only team to run with just the single pillar configuration. This is a decision that not only has an impact on weight but also aerodynamic performance. It has also allowed the option of a winglet above the exhaust too.
Racing Point
Racing Point RP20 front brake drum

Racing Point RP20 front brake drum
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
Mercedes AMG F1 W10, front brake

Mercedes AMG F1 W10, front brake
Photo by: Giorgio Piola
As Formula 1 heads for Silverstone the debate regarding the design of this year’s Racing Point rages on. As expected, Renault protested the result of the Hungarian GP, so if RP is found guilty of infringing the technical and sporting regulations it will lose the points accrued during those races.
The crux of Renault’s protest is not of the entire car, although everyone has drawn conclusions on how similar it is to last year’s Mercedes, it is instead focused on the Racing Point’s brake ducts (above left), which are a listed part for 2020. Mercedes' 2019 design is shown above right.

Again, the contention is not only based on the similarity of the external features of the two, which as you can see from the illustrations are extremely similar, it’s also about how closely aligned their internal makeup might (or might not) be.
 

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Discussion Starter #239
RACEFANS
Nurburgring to join 2020 F1 calendar with Portimao and Imola
2020 F1 calendar
22nd July 2020
by
Dieter Rencken and Keith Collantine

The Nurburgring is poised to make a surprise return to the Formula 1 calendar this season, seven years since it last held a grand prix.

RaceFans understands the former home of the German Grand Prix will be among the next batch of races to be added to this year’s revised schedule. A spokesperson for the circuit confirmed discussions with Formula 1 have taken place.

The world championship calendar has been extensively reorganised following the disruption caused by the global pandemic. So far 10 races have been confirmed up to the Russian Grand Prix on September 27th.
The Nurburgring is one of three venues which are expected to follow F1’s visit to Sochi. All three were not part of the original 2020 F1 calendar.
The other two races to join the schedule will include the revived Portuguese Grand Prix, last held at Estoril in 1996. Its race will take place at the Autodromo do Algarve near Portimao. F1 has never previously raced at the circuit, but a group of teams tested there shortly after it opened in 2008.
F1 will also add a further round of the world championship in Italy. This will take place at Imola, which previously held F1 races between 1980 and 2006. It will be the third race in Italy this year, along with the Italian Grand Prix at Monza and the Tuscan Grand Prix Ferrari 1000 at Mugello.
Start, Imola, 2006 San Marino Grand PrixF1 last raced at Imola in 2006…
Fernando Alonso, Renault, Autodromo do Algarve, 2009…but Algarve has never previously held a Grand Prix.
 

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RACEFANS
Nurburgring to join 2020 F1 calendar with Portimao and Imola
2020 F1 calendar
22nd July 2020
by
Dieter Rencken and Keith Collantine

The Nurburgring is poised to make a surprise return to the Formula 1 calendar this season, seven years since it last held a grand prix.

RaceFans understands the former home of the German Grand Prix will be among the next batch of races to be added to this year’s revised schedule. A spokesperson for the circuit confirmed discussions with Formula 1 have taken place.

The world championship calendar has been extensively reorganised following the disruption caused by the global pandemic. So far 10 races have been confirmed up to the Russian Grand Prix on September 27th.
The Nurburgring is one of three venues which are expected to follow F1’s visit to Sochi. All three were not part of the original 2020 F1 calendar.
The other two races to join the schedule will include the revived Portuguese Grand Prix, last held at Estoril in 1996. Its race will take place at the Autodromo do Algarve near Portimao. F1 has never previously raced at the circuit, but a group of teams tested there shortly after it opened in 2008.
F1 will also add a further round of the world championship in Italy. This will take place at Imola, which previously held F1 races between 1980 and 2006. It will be the third race in Italy this year, along with the Italian Grand Prix at Monza and the Tuscan Grand Prix Ferrari 1000 at Mugello.
Start, Imola, 2006 San Marino Grand PrixF1 last raced at Imola in 2006…
Fernando Alonso, Renault, Autodromo do Algarve, 2009…but Algarve has never previously held a Grand Prix.
That's nice but, unfortunately when they say 'Nurburgring', they mean the bland 'GP circuit', not the wonderful Nordschleife that hosted the German GP for many decades until Lauda's big crash in '76.
 
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