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Discussion Starter #201
Styrian Grand Prix
Red Bull Ring, Austria
EST
Friday, July 10 - Practice 1 - 4.55AM - ESPN2,

Friday, July 10 - Practice 2 - 8.55AM - ESPN2

Saturday, July 11 - Practice 3 - 5.55AM - ESPN2

Saturday, July 11 - Qualifying - 8.55AM - ESPN

Sunday, July 12 - Grand Prix Weekend - 8.00AM - ESPN

Sunday, July 12 - Race - 9.05AM - ESPN
 

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Discussion Starter #202
RACEFANS
Lewis Hamilton, Alexander Albon, Red Bull Ring, 2020Why stewards ruled Hamilton-Albon collision wasn’t a “racing incident”
2020 Austrian Grand Prix
Posted on
7th July 2020, 15:46 | Written by Dieter Renckenand Keith Collantine

FIA race director Michael Masi has given insight into the stewards’ decision to penalise Lewis Hamilton for his late-race collision with Alexander Albon.


Hamilton said the collision – his second with Albon in three races – was a “racing incident”. But the six-times world champion was given a five-second penalty and two penalty points on his licence for the incident, which dropped him from second place on the road to fourth in the final classification.

While Masi does not rule on incidents himself, he can refer them to stewards for their deliberation. He believes the positioning of the cars at the time of contact prompted their decision to penalise Hamilton.
“I think from what the stewards saw and having looked at it, obviously Alex had some momentum around the outside,” he said. “And the fact of the contact point, from what I’ve understood from their explanation, from Lewis’s front-left to Alex’s rear-right, was why they did not deem that a racing incident.
“They felt that Alex effectively was on the edge of the track, give or take, and had completed the overtaking manoeuvre. So for them, there wasn’t anything more to add, it was a quite simple driving infringement for causing a collision.”
Masi also explained the delay in issuing a five-second penalty for pit lane speeding to Sergio Perez. The Racing Point driver was penalised 20 minutes after the infringement took place.
“Quite simply, there was obviously a lot going on at that point in the race I think as everyone will acknowledge,” said Masi.
“It was just the first opportunity, with looking at incidents and so forth, that the stewards came across over the radio and said ‘time penalty for speeding’.”
 

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Sorry to cause you such anguish, my friend. ;)
Money is not a guarantee of success, but (relative) lack of money is a guarantee of lack of success.
The three richest teams have won every one of the last 140 races. That is not because they have all the most talented people or they work harder than the others.
Sundays aren't much fun for you, are they?
 

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Why stewards ruled Hamilton-Albon collision wasn’t a “racing incident”
“They felt that Alex effectively was on the edge of the track, give or take, and had completed the overtaking manoeuvre. So for them, there wasn’t anything more to add, it was a quite simple driving infringement for causing a collision.”
That's ridiculous. What could Hamilton have done to avoid it? He kept the same steering angle, but Albon tightened his line to clip Hamilton. IMO, Albon misjudged it - if he'd had gone a little wider, he'd have avoided the collision. If Hamilton had braked, or attempted to tighten his line, he'd have understeered into Albon.
 

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Discussion Starter #205 (Edited)
That's ridiculous. What could Hamilton have done to avoid it? He kept the same steering angle, but Albon tightened his line to clip Hamilton. IMO, Albon misjudged it - if he'd had gone a little wider, he'd have avoided the collision. If Hamilton had braked, or attempted to tighten his line, he'd have understeered into Albon.
As said earlier we don’t get to see on TV all the data available to stewards such as in car camera views or the FIA 360° camera shots. I read something earlier that during the pre race driver briefing the stewards said they were going to penalize off track (ie curb) driving so Albon was likely not wanting to make use of the curb space. They also installed detector loops in some curbs to detect the cars.
The stewards think Hamilton could have avoided hitting Albon.
The Honda PU fails were electrical - caused by excessive vibration from curbs.
The Mercedes light weight gearbox was suffering from curb shock damage and was the reason for Mercedes avoiding the curbs.
Not a good weekend for Hamilton - he got off lightly for the yellow flag transgression.
 

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Discussion Starter #208
RACEFANS
Start, Red Bull Ring, 2020Vote for your 2020 Austrian Grand Prix Driver of the Weekend
2020 Austrian Grand Prix
Posted on
7th July 2020
Written by Keith Collantine

Which Formula 1 driver made the most of the Austrian Grand Prix weekend?
It’s time to give your verdict on which driver did the best with the equipment at their disposal over the last three days.
Vote for your driver of the weekend
Which driver do you think did the best job throughout the race weekend?
Who got the most out of their car in qualifying and the race? Who put their team mate in the shade?
Cast your vote below and explain why you chose the driver you picked in the comments.
Who was the best driver of the 2020 Austrian Grand Prix weekend?
  • Lewis Hamilton (0%)

  • Valtteri Bottas (21%)

  • Sebastian Vettel (0%)

  • Charles Leclerc (26%)

  • Max Verstappen (3%)

  • Alexander Albon (5%)

  • Carlos Sainz Jnr (0%)

  • Lando Norris (46%)

  • Daniel Ricciardo (0%)

  • Esteban Ocon (0%)

  • Daniil Kvyat (0%)

  • Pierre Gasly (0%)

  • Sergio Perez (0%)

  • Lance Stroll (0%)

  • Kimi Raikkonen (0%)

  • Antonio Giovinazzi (0%)

  • Romain Grosjean (0%)

  • Kevin Magnussen (0%)

  • George Russell (0%)

  • Nicholas Latifi (0%)

  • No opinion (0%)
Total Voters: 39
An RaceFans account is required in order to vote. If you do not have one, register an account here or read more about registering here
When this poll is closed the result will be displayed instead of the voting form
 

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Discussion Starter #209
Early report from Horner said Honda problem was electrical ...

——————-
GPblog
Good news for Verstappen: "We've found the problem''
2020-07-08 08:36:57 by GPblog.com
Good news for Verstappen: We've found the problem''

Red Bull Racing experienced a horror weekend at the Austrian Grand Prix with two failures and therefore zero points. However, there is good news as Christian Horner reports that the problem has been found.
Two Red Bull's coming to a standstill. It's an image that we didn't see in 2019 and certainly didn't expect in 2020. Red Bull Racing just blew so high off the tower. This year was supposed to be Max Verstappen's championship year, but it's starting now with a backlog. However, that problem should now be solved.
READ MORE
Verstappen critical of himself: "I need to get that under control"
Solved Honda's problem
''We've checked the parts one by one and now it looks like there's been a problem with the engine's flywheel. We are now checking all parts to make sure we know how this problem arose and how this can be prevented in the future'', says Horner in the broadcast Sport & Talk on ServusTV.
READ MORE
Verstappen and Vettel critical on kerbs: "Can cause a lot of damage"
''With Honda we're working hard to find a solution to the problem before this weekend, so it won't happen again in the second race. We now know where the problem lies and we'll find a solution'', concludes Horner, who will be racing with his team again on his own Red Bull Ring.
 

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Discussion Starter #210
THE-RACE

COULD ALONSO DEAL RIPPLES LET VETTEL AND FERRARI SPLIT EARLY?

By Mark Hughes
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It’s pretty clear the Ferrari/Sebastian Vettel relationship is dead as it begins its final contracted season.
The four-time Formula 1 champion is bewildered and angry that there wasn’t even a negotiation for a contract – just a phone call telling him there’d be no place for him after this season.
So angry he wanted to confirm that detail to the world, as soon as he was asked last week.
Then there were shades of suspicion in his public questioning of how his car had become so undriveable in the race after feeling OK the day before.
Sebastian Vettel Ferrari Hungarian Grand Prix 2020

Team boss Mattia Binotto was clearly less than delighted at having to face questions about Vettel’s frank telling of the contract non-negotiations, and even less impressed with his drive in the race, a lowly 10th place finish after clumsy contact with Carlos Sainz Jr’s McLaren.
“He’s running wild there,” said a wry paddock observer of Vettel. “He’s going to integrate there like a hammer in spin dryer for the rest of the year.”
It’s difficult to see the contract running its course.
Ferrari has been here before. It infamously paid Kimi Raikkonen to leave a year early at the end of 2009. It fired Rene Arnoux after the first race of 1985 (pictured below).
Rene Arnoux Ferrari Brazilian Grand Prix 1985

This looks like a failed marriage seeing out their final days until the house is sold and they can go their separate ways.
Given that Vettel’s non-contract created a trigger effect of Sainz being recruited to replace him, Daniel Ricciardo filling Sainz’s place at McLaren and Fernando Alonso’s return to replace Ricciardo, could those moves now all happen sooner rather than later?
There will be some financial equations to work out, but given that the thing would be driven by Ferrari they would surely not be insurmountable. This, after all, is the team that was paying Raikkonen not to drive in 2010 and for Alonso to drive for McLaren in 2015.
Daniel Ricciardo

At Renault, Ricciardo and Cyril Abiteboul certainly seem to have their enthusiasm for each other well under control. McLaren and Sainz are caught in the middle, perfectly happy with each other and looking forward to a great final season together.
But if push came to shove, would McLaren be disappointed to get Ricciardo early, would Sainz be OK with wearing red this year?
Having Alonso sooner rather than later would be box office for F1 too at a very difficult time.
And Vettel? He could lick his wounds, maybe observe the progress of Racing Point’s pink Mercedes this year, with a possible view to being the face of Aston Martin’s F1 programme in 2021.
 

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Everything makes sense except the prospect of Vettel driving for the Aston clowns - oops, I mean driving the Mercedes clones - next year. Why on earth would he want to do that?
The starting point, however, has to be whether Ferrari would be willing to pay Vettel $25m or whatever to walk away, and whether either McLaren or Renault would be willing to pick up the difference between Sainz's and Ricciardo's salaries, which is supposedly on the order of $20m/yr.
 

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They have not been much fun for a lot of people, including most racing fans, which is precisely why the rules are being fundamentally changed.
What results would prove to be a victory for proponents of cost caps and other ‘level the playing field’ type strategies?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #213
THE-RACE
RED BULL, HONDA HAVE COUNTERMEASURES FOR ENGINE ISSUES
By Scott Mitchell
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Red Bull drivers Max Verstappen and Alex Albon will re-use their engines from the Formula 1 season opener this weekend, as Red Bull and Honda have countermeasures to avoid repeat electrical problems.
Verstappen and Albon retired from the Austrian Grand Prix with what Honda said were electrical issues, leaving Red Bull with zero points from a race both drivers felt they were in contention to win at one point – although Albon had already dropped back after a clash with Lewis Hamilton.
Red Bull said parts had been sent back to the UK and Japan for analysis and Honda has now confirmed neither engine suffered damage to warrant a change for this weekend’s Styrian Grand Prix.
It has also been able to take steps in the short period between the back-to-back Red Bull Ring races to try to prevent a repeat.

Honda F1 technical director Toyoharu Tanabe said both problems last Sunday were electrical “but caused by different issues”, with Verstappen’s related to the flywheel.
“We have been analysing both these matters together with the teams and we have put countermeasures in place for this weekend,” he said.
“As our power units do not have any damage caused by those issues, Max and Alex will use their same PUs this weekend.
“This weekend, we must aim to finish the race with all four cars and achieve a good result with them.”
Honda brought a new engine specification to the season opener which is understood to have developed good gains.
Red Bull hoped this plus its own aerodynamic upgrades would help it start the season challenging Mercedes for wins, but found itself half a second off the pace in qualifying.
Team boss Christian Horner said this week that Red Bull has “a chunk of data to go through to establish why we were not as quick in qualifying as we would have liked”.
And Verstappen believes finding a step in one-lap performance will put Red Bull on the right level as he felt confident its race pace was strong enough to contend for the win, before the engine issue prevent his alternative tyre strategy from playing out.
“I feel good but of course the result was not what we wanted, which was to score a good amount of points and fight for the win,” said Verstappen.
“I was looking good for a podium which I thought was easily possible because it was basically between Mercedes and myself on raw pace.
“But then you also look at how the whole race panned out, we could have scored a good amount of points against Lewis but it is what it is, we can’t change it and now I’m looking forward to hopefully having a more positive weekend.
“We were a bit down on pace compared to Mercedes in qualifying so we definitely need to close that gap to fight them in that area rather than on strategy.
“Our pace is usually a bit better in the race than in quali but there is still quite a bit of work to do which the engineers are flat out on.
“We have ideas and the direction to work on for this weekend so that’s positive.”
Motor Racing Formula One World Championship Austrian Grand Prix Qualifying Day Spielberg, Austria

While the two Red Bull cars have escaped needing an engine change, the same cannot be said for George Russell’s Williams.
After the Briton retired from the season opener, his Mercedes power unit was sent to the manufacturer’s base for a check-up, and a problem was uncovered that is believed to be specific to this particular unit, according to F1.com.
Russell will thus take on the Styrian Grand Prix with a new combustion engine, turbo and MGU-H.
 

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As I mentioned in an earlier post, Vettel should just walk away before he gets hurt. He was a beast for his four championship years, but with a wife and kid now, he's lost a little. He need not worry about getting fired from Ferrari, they fire almost everybody. They fired P. Hill, John Surtees, Alain Prost, Kimi, all World Champions at some time in their career and Rene Arnoux among others. And far as coming up with money to pay a new driver, they could sell more t-shirts. Lastly I don't think Fernando is the answer. He is 39 now having been out of F-1 for sometime, and is not really a team player. He was angry with McLaren for not designating him No.1 when Lewis joined the team and generally made life difficult for the team. When Lewis performed well and came within a couple of points of winning the title his FIRST year Fernando backed off a little. Then came spygate and McLaren had to forfeit the manufacturers title and pay a large fine (100m I believe) Fernando's reputation was sealed as pretty much being a snake out for himself only. I do like Danny Ric, don't think he should have left Red Bull, but is hungry, can drive and is a team player. Guess thats my.20c.
 

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What results would prove to be a victory for proponents of cost caps and other ‘level the playing field’ type strategies?


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To look forward to every race knowing that many teams, not only the three with by far the biggest budgets, have a genuine chance to win.
 

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Discussion Starter #217
RACEFANS
Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, Red Bull Ring, 2020Hamilton smashes field by 1.2s in rain for Styrian Grand Prix pole
2020 Styrian Grand Prix qualifying
Posted on
11th July 2020
by
Keith Collantine
An exceptional performance by Lewis Hamilton at a rain-lashed Red Bull Ring saw the Mercedes driver take pole position by 1.2 seconds ahead of Max Verstappen.


Carlos Sainz Jnrmade it three different cars in the top three. He’ll share the second row of the grid with last week’s winner Valtteri Bottas.

Q1
The prolonged period of heavy rain which arrived at the Red Bull Ring on Saturday had already forced the cancellation of final practice when the qualifying hour rolled around. Teasing, the rain relented for a while as 3pm approached, only to return with a vengeance. Clearly, qualifying could not begin at its allotted time, as was duly postponed.
It finally began after a 46-minute delay on a track which was soaked but nonetheless passable. It was full wet weather tyres all round for the field as they assembled at the pit lane exit, led by Sebastian Vettel, some queuing for more than two minutes, anxious not to miss what could be the best of the conditions.
In the event almost all of Q1 ran to schedule without interruption. Lap times steady fell throughout, but a largely flawless show of driving by the field kept cars out of barriers.
Romain Grosjean, the last driver onto the track, was the first one off it, skidding into the turn four gravel on his out-lap. He rejoined but only drove as far as the pits, where he stopped with a suspected water pump problem, and took no further part in the session.
Most drivers opted to take second, fresh sets of wet weather tyres as the session wore on, to benefit from the superior grip of unworn tread. Seven drivers resisted the temptation including both Mercedes and both McLarens. The Red Bull pair did too, though Alexander Albon was only 14th, and Daniel Ricciardo did the same. Both Ferrari drivers made it through, but
George Russell took advantage of the adverse conditions to secure Williams’ first appearance in Q2 for more than a year. But Antonio Giovinazzi brought the session to an early end, crashing his Alfa Romeo at the end of the lap. After being told to rejoin he dragged debris onto the track, then came to a stop as the session was red-flagged.
Kimi Raikkonen joined his team mate in elimination, while Nicholas Latifi was over a second off his flying team mate and also went out. Sergio Perez also dropped out along with Grosjean.
Drivers eliminated in Q1
16Kimi RaikkonenAlfa Romeo-Ferrari1’21.372
17Sergio PerezRacing Point-Mercedes1’21.607
18Nicholas LatifiWilliams-Mercedes1’21.759
19Antonio GiovinazziAlfa Romeo-Ferrari1’21.831
20Romain GrosjeanHaas-Ferrari
Q2
Hamilton and Verstappen swapped quickest times throughout the second part of qualifying, ending up separated by a tenth of a second. They were half a second clear of the chasing pack, which was led by Lando Norris, the McLaren driver in good shape having had therapy for the pain he suffered yesterday.
A week earlier only one of the Ferrari drivers made the cut for Q3. The same happened again, but this time it was Charles Leclerc who progressed no further than Q2. Sebastian Vettel had a messy moment on the kerbs at the exit of turn one, but gathered it up and claimed the final place in the top 10 by a tenth of a second from his team mate.
The two Ferraris were followed, impressively, by Russell’s Williams in 12th place. Daniil Kvyat, who was involved in an incident with Leclerc, joined the Ferrari driver in progressing no further. The second Racing Point and Haas, of Lance Stroll and Kevin Magnussen respectively, were also eliminated.
Drivers eliminated in Q2
11Charles LeclercFerrari1’19.628
12George RussellWilliams-Mercedes1’19.636
13Lance StrollRacing Point-Mercedes1’19.645
14Daniil KvyatAlphaTauri-Honda1’19.717
15Kevin MagnussenHaas-Ferrari1’20.211
Q3
The conditions had visibly worsened further as the final 10 drivers took to the track for the pole position shoot-out. Verstappen set the pace initially, but Hamilton unleashed the potential of the Mercedes with his final two runs.
The first lifted the black W11 seven-tenths of a second clear of the field. His final effort added another half a second to that margin.
Red Bull told Verstappen “we’ll give you all the performance for this final lap”, and he began his decisive effort with the fastest time of anyone through sector one. But Hamilton, running behind him, soon pegged that back. Verstappen remained on course for a substantial improvement in his time, but as he reached turn nine he found a pit-bound Vettel at the apex.
The Red Bull snapped sideways, and though Verstappen’s awesome reflexes kept it out of the wall, his chance to improve was gone. Nonetheless he secured the second spot on the front row.
Pierre Gasly briefly had the AlphaTauri up in third place, but slipped back over the final runs. Sainz took advantage, placing his McLaren in a superb third, cheering “ole, ole, ole” as the team confirmed the result. Esteban Ocon, who had a disappointing qualifying session one week earlier, put his Renault an excellent fifth, Bottas separating him from Sainz.
Having been third in Q2, Norris was a disappointed sixth, which will become ninth after his grid penalty. That will promote Albon, Gasly and Daniel Ricciardo. Vettel qualified 10th.
Top ten in Q3
1Lewis HamiltonMercedes1’19.273
2Max VerstappenRed Bull-Honda1’20.489
3Carlos Sainz JnrMcLaren-Renault1’20.671
4Valtteri BottasMercedes1’20.701
5Esteban OconRenault1’20.922
6Lando NorrisMcLaren-Renault1’20.925
7Alexander AlbonRed Bull-Honda1’21.011
8Pierre GaslyAlphaTauri-Honda1’21.028
9Daniel RicciardoRenault1’21.192
10Sebastian VettelFerrari1’21.651

 

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Will be fun to see how Lando tries to deal with Ricciardo, Ocon, Albon, Vettel, and the boy who is in the Guinness Book of Records for the world's worst excuse for a beard, Pierre Fuzzly. Carlos will get blown away by Bottas but, barring retirements, a fourth for him would be a great result.
 

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Discussion Starter #219
the-race
GARY ANDERSON: WHY McLAREN WAS THE STANDOUT CAR IN THE WET

By Gary Anderson
When it comes to driving in the wet, especially for the first time in a season and when it’s going straight into qualifying, it’s the driver that is the hero.

But underneath the driver there needs to be a car that is balanced and compliant so it gives the person at the wheel some progressive feedback and with an engine package that delivers its power smoothly.

In Styrian Grand Prix Q3, we ended up with 10 cars fighting for pole. I am going to take a quick look at those 10 cars and drivers.

2 X MERCEDES
No big surprise here because, as we all know, Lewis Hamilton is a rocketship when it comes to judging the grip level of a track. He just seems to be able to take it much nearer the limit than anyone else. Valtteri Bottas in the same car is an example of what I mean – 1.428s slower than Hamilton is a lifetime in F1.

Lewis Hamilton Mercedes takes Styrian Grand Prix pole 2020


2 X RED BULL
Again, we shouldn’t expect anything else from Red Bull. Max Verstappen experiments a lot with the racing lines in the wet and is without doubt brave, but that bravery sometimes costs him. Lapping 0.522s faster than team-mate Alex Albon shows that – and Albon is no slouch.

2 X MCLAREN
Heading into the second race of the season, McLaren has definitely found a new lease of life for 2020. It looks like it is competitive in all conditions and with either driver – major progress considering where McLaren was in 2018. Carlos Sainz Jr ended up 0.254s faster than Lando Norris.

2 X RENAULT
Both drivers did a competent job, showing the car has a decent balance. I think Esteban Ocon has now showed that he is capable of taking on Daniel Ricciardo. In the dry, it might just take a little more time but in the wet he was the faster through all of the sessions. He ended up 0.270s faster than his team-mate.

Esteban Ocon Renault Styrian Grand Prix 2020


1 X ALPHATAURI
Pierre Gasly has showed he is much happier at AlphaTauri than he was when he got his chance with the mothership Red Bull team. And in conditions like today, it shows he can let his natural talent flow. In Q2, he was 0.973s faster than team-mate Daniil Kvyat.

1 X FERRARI
And then there was Ferrari. Dry or wet, it is basically in the ‘proverbial’. Sebastian Vettel ended up 10th (last) in Q3, 10th in Q2 (last to get through), which was faster than team-mate Charles Leclerc by 0.083s. Basically, this shows that both drivers are very close but they just don’t have the car.

Only two weekends in and, performance wise, Ferrari is now firmly embedded in that midfield battle. The biggest worry for Ferrari is that it is not even leading that group.

Carlos Sainz Jr McLaren Styrian Grand Prix 2020


Out of all that, I would say that the McLaren chassis is the one that stands out to me.

Two cars qualifying in the top six in less than ideal conditions, with just a quarter-of-a-second between them, shows that the drivers have confidence in the car.

As these two consecutive races at the same track have shown, the team knows how to get the best out of its chassis in both the dry and the wet conditions.

If it can keep this sort of performance up and Ferrari doesn’t alter its approach to its lack of performance, McLaren might just be able to move beyond that coveted fourth place that it took in last year’s constructors’ championship and move up to third.

 
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