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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where are your wheels made? Where does your material come from? How clean is the facility where your wheels are manufactured? We believe transparency is key to building and selling a quality product, and we are proud to show what we do and where we do it. We think there is no better place to build the finest motorsport wheels in the world, than right here in Texas!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgfBX_uk1ZQ

 

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Nice looking wheels, I do not see any weights on the website listed for any of the styles or any sizes. Maybe I need glasses. Care to post them here?
 

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Nice looking wheels, I do not see any weights on the website listed for any of the styles or any sizes. Maybe I need glasses. Care to post them here?
Great question, and I hope to give you a great answer, bear with me. It actually goes back into our manufacturing philosophy, which is everything we build is engineered for your car, and not modified to fit your car. We don't take a forged spun blank, mill out the spoke pattern, stick it on the shelf, and then do final machining (hub bore, bolt pattern, and mill off the backpad for the offset) when an order comes in. We design a specific model for your application and usage, run detailed FEA in ANSYS which is based off our physical testing lab results using racing slicks, not street tires, and THEN machine that specific model for your car. As such, the specific details for that build will ultimately impact total mass.

As such, we can't take a style (say our F110) in 18x13" and say it weighs "X" because the variances in hub bore sizing, bolt pattern, offset (backpad sizing) additional lightening options, and application are going to dictate how the wheel is engineered and cut. A 911 rear loads the wheel very differently than a Corvette C6 rear, even though they may be identically sized, and thus it is engineered and cut very differently. Also even the forging profiles we use vary from application to application, so the spoke profile will even affect the weight.

Also where the weight is, can be almost as important as static weight. Unsprung weight is certainly important, but big rotational inertia gains can be had by spending a lot of engineering time removing weight at the extreme edges of the wheel where there is low stress. We spend a LOT of time on this.

But to give you some various examples including some Mclaren examples:

18x13" F110 for Corvette rear and 56mm offset with every lightening option - 19.8 lb
19x12 F110 rear 720 wheel with 1 of 3 additional lightening options is 22.9 lb. This wheel would be around 20-21 lb with all options.
19x11 F14 570 rear 43mm offset is 22.1 lb with no ultralight option. This would be close to 21 lb with the UL option.

It is also worth nothing we don't build to a weight, but to an appropriate, robust load rating, using a racing slick in the equation for maximum load transfer. We could build a 13 lb wheel, how much fatigue life do you want out of it and how much load do you want it to be capable of? We factor in a pretty big safety margin on the load, you have to when running a full racing slick.

Our new F14 uses very thin and deep spokes. Besides being a very strong inherent design, it looks fantastic!

 
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