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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably a common type of thread, but hopefully someone was in my shoes and can provide an opinion. I've been interested in a 720S for a few years and am learning the differences between each Trim level. I definitely want a highly optioned Performance Trim.
My current situation and mindset is that I currently own a modified 2014 Audi R8 with a Supercharged V10 with a DCT for shifting. I'm probably into the car for about $225k - $250k in total. Very happy with the car and setup, very reliable, performance is awesome. Doesn't change the fact that I also love the look of the 720S.
What I am struggling with is I own the Audi, have it for nearly 8 years now. I'm not going to do anything else to it, I don't drive it a lot, but love to drive on the track. I only go out maybe 3 times per year, but really love it. I have to trade in the Audi if I buy a 720, and I'll go back to having a substantial loan for a few years.
I do not plan on modifying the 720 at all and I assume it would be as good or better than the Audi on the Track in its current form. So, I ask myself, do I want to drive that expensive of a car on the track? My rationalization to myself is, you can never use the car on the street the way it was intended to be driven, so it would be a waste to have it and not track it once in a while. I know not everyone feels this way, but for me, it's a thing.
I also am afraid that I will regret selling the Audi; the car is not without its own minor issues, but reliability and longevity are important to me.
I've had the car awhile, maybe I should move to something else.
Will Mclaren be around in the forseeable future? What happens to the cars, if you need parts and/or service if they disappear? What happens to the value of the cars? No one knows what will happen, but this is what floats around my head.
This seems to be my process when switching from one car to another. I had similar thoguhts when I went from my second Viper to the Audi, and I did not regret it one bit. Any thoughts, opinions would be greatly appreciated!
Also, has anyone worked with McLaren in Greenwich, CT?
 

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Probably a common type of thread, but hopefully someone was in my shoes and can provide an opinion. I've been interested in a 720S for a few years and am learning the differences between each Trim level. I definitely want a highly optioned Performance Trim.
My current situation and mindset is that I currently own a modified 2014 Audi R8 with a Supercharged V10 with a DCT for shifting. I'm probably into the car for about $225k - $250k in total. Very happy with the car and setup, very reliable, performance is awesome. Doesn't change the fact that I also love the look of the 720S.
What I am struggling with is I own the Audi, have it for nearly 8 years now. I'm not going to do anything else to it, I don't drive it a lot, but love to drive on the track. I only go out maybe 3 times per year, but really love it. I have to trade in the Audi if I buy a 720, and I'll go back to having a substantial loan for a few years.
I do not plan on modifying the 720 at all and I assume it would be as good or better than the Audi on the Track in its current form. So, I ask myself, do I want to drive that expensive of a car on the track? My rationalization to myself is, you can never use the car on the street the way it was intended to be driven, so it would be a waste to have it and not track it once in a while. I know not everyone feels this way, but for me, it's a thing.
I also am afraid that I will regret selling the Audi; the car is not without its own minor issues, but reliability and longevity are important to me.
I've had the car awhile, maybe I should move to something else.
Will Mclaren be around in the forseeable future? What happens to the cars, if you need parts and/or service if they disappear? What happens to the value of the cars? No one knows what will happen, but this is what floats around my head.
This seems to be my process when switching from one car to another. I had similar thoguhts when I went from my second Viper to the Audi, and I did not regret it one bit. Any thoughts, opinions would be greatly appreciated!
Also, has anyone worked with McLaren in Greenwich, CT?
I'm currently wrestling with a similar dilemma with regard to taking my car on track. It's expensive to track a McLaren, particularly if you have OE brakes, and even more so if they're CCBs. The OE pads are relatively soft, which protect the extremely expensive rotors, but OE front pads are $1200 and only last a couple of days on track. You can get cheaper pads that last longer, but then you're increasing the wear on the rotors. There are other costs too, insurance since the car is high value, track inspection if you have a warranty on it, and Corsa tyres are only good for a few track days too. It's also somewhat problematic to do 2 or 3 days a year, since most of the clubs are geared towards tracking at least once a month, with the focus on training and improving lap times. I don't give a crap about my lap time, I just want to enjoy going fast in my car and to take it beyond what I can do on the road.

Part availability is already an issue, and parts are also expensive (roughly twice as much in the US as in the UK, and they're not cheap in the UK). Reliability on track is fine, just the usual potential issues with increased heat, consumables, etc.
 

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I would see if you could get your hands on a 720S and take it for a drive. I think there are many aspects of owning these cars (prestige, performance, personal aspirations and life goals, the thrill of driving). Driving it to see if the shoe fits is very important especially when you are on the fence. You can look at one, and hear it, but those are only two out of the five sense we have, and I think you need a more informed decision before you make the financial commitment. As far as tracking it, I think that's another level requiring investment such as driver education, money for consumables, track insurance, etc. I agree with you, there is pretty much no where on the street that you can open up the car and experience its limits like you can on a track. It sounds like you are in the mood for a change. The 720s is such a great car and I don't think you will regret the switch, however, hopefully you can at least drive one before you take the plunge to be totally sure. Also, if you can swing it - on top of the 720s, there's also the idea of buying a dedicated track car that can be a lot less expensive than a 720s, and beating it up and not having to worry about taking out your prized toy especially if there is fear of potential loss. It might be almost as fun for a lot less worry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've eaten up many, many brakes in the R8 until switching to Audi CCBs using Pagid RSC1s. They have been good since then, but was an expensive upgrade. It's definitely the cost of racing, but am more concerned that my car will be laid up for 2-3 months waiting for parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would see if you could get your hands on a 720S and take it for a drive. I think there are many aspects of owning these cars (prestige, performance, personal aspirations and life goals, the thrill of driving). Driving it to see if the shoe fits is very important especially when you are on the fence. You can look at one, and hear it, but those are only two out of the five sense we have, and I think you need a more informed decision before you make the financial commitment. As far as tracking it, I think that's another level requiring investment such as driver education, money for consumables, track insurance, etc. I agree with you, there is pretty much no where on the street that you can open up the car and experience its limits like you can on a track. It sounds like you are in the mood for a change. The 720s is such a great car and I don't think you will regret the switch, however, hopefully you can at least drive one before you take the plunge to be totally sure. Also, if you can swing it - on top of the 720s, there's also the idea of buying a dedicated track car that can be a lot less expensive than a 720s, and beating it up and not having to worry about taking out your prized toy especially if there is fear of potential loss. It might be almost as fun for a lot less worry.
All, excellent points. I do want to go to a dealer and drive one, but not until I am ready mentally. Usually, once that happens, I am closing in on the final decision. Thank you for your insights.
 

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I've eaten up many, many brakes in the R8 until switching to Audi CCBs using Pagid RSC1s. They have been good since then, but was an expensive upgrade. It's definitely the cost of racing, but am more concerned that my car will be laid up for 2-3 months waiting for parts.
Generally, people who track their McLarens a lot go the other way, from CCBs to steel. The CCB rotors perform very well, resisting fade, etc, but if you're on a track with heavy braking zones, you can reach the temperature at which the silicone-carbide surface starts to break down (~800C). A few track days a year on lower-speed tracks may be fine, but running RSC1s with the stock rotors is likely to be a problem. If you don't want steel, there are other CCB rotor options that use long fibres which are more durable and can also be re-surfaced (Racing Brake, Surface Transform), but it's not a cheap switch. On the 720, there is also the potential problem of uneven pad wear, which seems to be related to the caliper mounting, and which can cause excess rotor wear.

There are posts about cars waiting on parts, but how much of that is a McLaren problem and how much is a general supply chain problem that also applies to other manufacturers is unclear. I've had several parts replaced (control arms, rear hatch latch, door struts, oil seal), and haven't had to wait on anything. Tracking is hard on the control arms, btw.....

The 720 also comes with trick suspension, which means extra maintenance for the accumulators which need to be replaced fairly often, especially if you're working the suspension hard. There's an updated part from the 765, but there's a cost to convert, and the accumulators themselves are more expensive.
 

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Once you drive a 720S you won't go back to Audi, Porsche etc. I switched from Porsche to Ferrari to an 12C and then finally upgraded to a 720S 2 yrs ago. Wow. What a car.
It gives you as much as you can handle or just drives really calm and nice. Not a track guy but have taken it out on 2 Mclaren sponsored track days. The 720S is an amazing track
car for someone who just wants to experience it and not really interested in racing or needing a 765/Sena .
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Generally, people who track their McLarens a lot go the other way, from CCBs to steel. The CCB rotors perform very well, resisting fade, etc, but if you're on a track with heavy braking zones, you can reach the temperature at which the silicone-carbide surface starts to break down (~800C). A few track days a year on lower-speed tracks may be fine, but running RSC1s with the stock rotors is likely to be a problem. If you don't want steel, there are other CCB rotor options that use long fibres which are more durable and can also be re-surfaced (Racing Brake, Surface Transform), but it's not a cheap switch. On the 720, there is also the potential problem of uneven pad wear, which seems to be related to the caliper mounting, and which can cause excess rotor wear.
I've also seen that with the R8, steel is definitley a lot cheaper to run, but under heavy braking, I had problems. Some of it could have also been my inexperience at the time.

Just go drive one and I'm sure the decision will be made immediately. :D
That's why I want to have a solid idea of what I want first. It's like going to "look" at a puppy. If I go to look, I'm probably coming home with one.

Once you drive a 720S you won't go back to Audi, Porsche etc. I switched from Porsche to Ferrari to an 12C and then finally upgraded to a 720S 2 yrs ago. Wow. What a car.
It gives you as much as you can handle or just drives really calm and nice. Not a track guy but have taken it out on 2 Mclaren sponsored track days. The 720S is an amazing track
car for someone who just wants to experience it and not really interested in racing or needing a 765/Sena .
I don't intend to beat the crap out of it, but would love to experience it on the track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have a very old, very generous friend who invited me to his track. I was able to drive a 720S and a 600LT. 4 months later I owned a 720S. Once you have it you will sell the R8 in my opinion.
I'd imagine that you are correct. The way I figure it is I'm not getting any younger. I'd like to enjoy the things I can, while I can. I'm sure we all lust after different cars, be it a Ferrari, Aston, Maserati, whatever. It's certainly nice to own a few different vehicles and experience them.
 

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I'd imagine that you are correct. The way I figure it is I'm not getting any younger. I'd like to enjoy the things I can, while I can. I'm sure we all lust after different cars, be it a Ferrari, Aston, Maserati, whatever. It's certainly nice to own a few different vehicles and experience them.

.......and you will fall back to the 720S.
 
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