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Looks like Chris had a change of heart on the 765LT
he comes out and says he wants to do another review because he thinks McLaren did significantly change the car. Which completely makes sense.

I continue to think it‘s weird none of the other professionals who gave it less than stellar initial reviews have gone on to update, change or just overwrite their “opinion of record”
 

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Chris Harris latest Top Gear Review bears little resemblance to his original reviews 18 months ago, where he found the car twitchy, difficult to control and unpredictable both on track and on the road.Owners of the 765LT and others have heaped universal praise over the car. Harris change of opinion is due to one of the following possibilities:

1. The 765 has undergone a substantive set up and alignment change which now suits Harris preferences;
2. Harris originally was critical of the car so as not to appear as a Mclaren fanboy due to his glowing commentary of the Senna, 600LT and the 720S;
3. The car has not been changed, but after a lengthy period of driving the latest cars, he has come to appreciate how uniquely stellar the 765 is.

Prior to purchasing a new model car, reviews take on additional import since potential buyers desire to gain more knowledge about the driving dynamics and other characteristics of the car. However, after owning and experiencing the car, reviews continue to be mysteriously relevant. Why would it matter what others' assessment of the car is? Should not the only opinion of relevance be the owner and how he feels about the car? Apparently not. Due to the pervasive insecurity of super car owners, there is this obsession to have ones purchase validated by others, especially the ersatz experts. Even if we naively accept that all magazine reviewers are scrupulously honest in their reviews and are not influenced by financial or editorial concerns, their evaluations are nevertheless highly subjective and emblematic of their individual preferences and priorities.
 

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Chris Harris latest Top Gear Review bears little resemblance to his original reviews 18 months ago, where he found the car twitchy, difficult to control and unpredictable both on track and on the road.Owners of the 765LT and others have heaped universal praise over the car. Harris change of opinion is due to one of the following possibilities:

1. The 765 has undergone a substantive set up and alignment change which now suits Harris preferences;
2. Harris originally was critical of the car so as not to appear as a Mclaren fanboy due to his glowing commentary of the Senna, 600LT and the 720S;
3. The car has not been changed, but after a lengthy period of driving the latest cars, he has come to appreciate how uniquely stellar the 765 is.

Prior to purchasing a new model car, reviews take on additional import since potential buyers desire to gain more knowledge about the driving dynamics and other characteristics of the car. However, after owning and experiencing the car, reviews continue to be mysteriously relevant. Why would it matter what others' assessment of the car is? Should not the only opinion of relevance be the owner and how he feels about the car? Apparently not. Due to the pervasive insecurity of super car owners, there is this obsession to have ones purchase validated by others, especially the ersatz experts. Even if we naively accept that all magazine reviewers are scrupulously honest in their reviews and are not influenced by financial or editorial concerns, their evaluations are nevertheless highly subjective and emblematic of their individual preferences and priorities.
I don't have a 765lt but is it possible his comments were based off him overestimating his driving ability and turning all stability and traction control off the first time around? Mclaren recommends to keep ESC dynamic on while on track but it seems like many journalists will turn it all off to better asses the fundamental handling characteristics of the car but it seems that Mclaren designed the car with that mode in mind. My memory is a bit hazy but when I read/watched the various reviews it seemed the only ones speaking positively about the car had left it on.
 

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I don't have a 765lt but is it possible his comments were based off him overestimating his driving ability and turning all stability and traction control off the first time around? Mclaren recommends to keep ESC dynamic on while on track but it seems like many journalists will turn it all off to better asses the fundamental handling characteristics of the car but it seems that Mclaren designed the car with that mode in mind. My memory is a bit hazy but when I read/watched the various reviews it seemed the only ones speaking positively about the car had left it on.
the cars changed Guys. Substantially.
when it was slower than a 720 on a circuit or any circuit it’s missed it’s brief badly.

it spent a good deal of time being redeveloped which was scaredly a secret but perhaps not widely publicised.

it’s good that the actual owners of the car seem to enjoy it a good deal and that’s what the redevelopment was for.
harris I am certain is more than capable of driving with all systems off.
 

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the cars changed Guys. Substantially.
when it was slower than a 720 on a circuit or any circuit it’s missed it’s brief badly.

it spent a good deal of time being redeveloped which was scaredly a secret but perhaps not widely publicised.

it’s good that the actual owners of the car seem to enjoy it a good deal and that’s what the redevelopment was for.
harris I am certain is more than capable of driving with all systems off.
Care to elaborate on such a bold comment?

Software, hardware, what exactly???
 

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Care to elaborate on such a bold comment?

Software, hardware, what exactly???
see this is a story. And nobody wants to write it ? While it’s interesting in its own right, it also has greater implications for McLaren. Why the F did they have the car reviewed before it was ready ? It’s not like they don’t have drivers. Or if they felt they had to get outside feedback, to do it under NDA.

This launch was crucial. A misstep here is a big deal and business misjudgment. Imagine a world in which the 765 isn’t loved by the owners and takes much longer to sell out. It’d call into question the viability of the company’s entire product plan. Did they rush it because they absolutely had to sell anything to stay afloat, they rolled the dice on this launch, came up a bit short and heroically retrofitted it before delivery ? Or did they really misjudge their own product and get surprised by the feedback ?
 

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Where is your evidence for your claim ? I am not stating categorically that your assertion is inaccurate as I posted it as a possible development which accounts for Harris reversing his intial impressions of the 765. For every owner, the 765 they purchased is a remarkable achievement, the likes of which I have previously not experienced.
 

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see this is a story. And nobody wants to write it ? While it’s interesting in its own right, it also has greater implications for McLaren. Why the F did they have the car reviewed before it was ready ? It’s not like they don’t have drivers. Or if they felt they had to get outside feedback, to do it under NDA.

This launch was crucial. A misstep here is a big deal and business misjudgment. Imagine a world in which the 765 isn’t loved by the owners and takes much longer to sell out. It’d call into question the viability of the company’s entire product plan. Did they rush it because they absolutely had to sell anything to stay afloat, they rolled the dice on this launch, came up a bit short and heroically retrofitted it before delivery ? Or did they really misjudge their own product and get surprised by the feedback ?
It may be a great story but doesn't every factory improve their cars until the last one is produced and even after.
We can go back to the MP4 - Mac offered 30 more hp free.
First LT laid solid foundation, next thing you know someone went shopping in Senna parts bin and stuffed the LT full of Senna - I think that's the story.
Porsche stuffs big bro's engine inside lil bro - guys go nuts while 765LT is 1/2 the price of Senna.
 

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It may be a great story but doesn't every factory improve their cars until the last one is produced and even after.
We can go back to the MP4 - Mac offered 30 more hp free.
First LT laid solid foundation, next thing you know someone went shopping in Senna parts bin and stuffed the LT full of Senna - I think that's the story.
Porsche stuffs big bro's engine inside lil bro - guys go nuts while 765LT is 1/2 the price of Senna.
this is not even remotely the same as whiffing on the initial press reviews and overhauling the car before delivery. If that is indeed what happened …
 

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this is not even remotely the same as whiffing on the initial press reviews and overhauling the car before delivery. If that is indeed what happened …
Who knows what happened - it's a process when cars are being tested produced and so on.
Maybe Harris got an early drive and couldn't wait to whine or maybe he's just a whiner as he sounds like a little kid and drives like one in his reviews. I think he has an axe to grind on any car priced above his beloved P.

He does the same thing with the SF90 -
 

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Who knows what happened - it's a process when cars are being tested produced and so on.
Maybe Harris got an early drive and couldn't wait to whine or maybe he's just a whiner as he sounds like a little kid and drives like one in his reviews. I think he has an axe to grind on any car priced above his beloved P.

He does the same thing with the SF90 -
He doesn't sound there like he has an axe to grind, other than perhaps against the modern, expensive, complicated cars that don't improve on the driving experience over simpler, cheaper cars.
 

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Everyone has an agenda. Different degree and some are further along the axe grinding spectrum. (yes, i have an agenda too).

I like Chris Harris. I find him entertaining and sometimes informative. I am also very much okay when my experience and preferences differ significantly from Chris Harris.

While it’s interesting to try and figure out what happened. Most likely, we won’t get close to the truth. Too many competing agenda and direct connections to the sources of truth is unlikely.
 

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Chris Harris latest Top Gear Review bears little resemblance to his original reviews 18 months ago, where he found the car twitchy, difficult to control and unpredictable both on track and on the road.Owners of the 765LT and others have heaped universal praise over the car. Harris change of opinion is due to one of the following possibilities:

1. The 765 has undergone a substantive set up and alignment change which now suits Harris preferences;
2. Harris originally was critical of the car so as not to appear as a Mclaren fanboy due to his glowing commentary of the Senna, 600LT and the 720S;
3. The car has not been changed, but after a lengthy period of driving the latest cars, he has come to appreciate how uniquely stellar the 765 is.

Prior to purchasing a new model car, reviews take on additional import since potential buyers desire to gain more knowledge about the driving dynamics and other characteristics of the car. However, after owning and experiencing the car, reviews continue to be mysteriously relevant. Why would it matter what others' assessment of the car is? Should not the only opinion of relevance be the owner and how he feels about the car? Apparently not. Due to the pervasive insecurity of super car owners, there is this obsession to have ones purchase validated by others, especially the ersatz experts. Even if we naively accept that all magazine reviewers are scrupulously honest in their reviews and are not influenced by financial or editorial concerns, their evaluations are nevertheless highly subjective and emblematic of their individual preferences and priorities.
well it is a good thing you answered your own questions... 18months as you mention, sure mclaren did zero development work on the car during that period, makes perfect sense.
and why is that a bad thing somehow? Mclaren kept on working on the car to give the owners the car they deserved. how is that bad, why arent you guys happy about that mclaren has delivered a car to its owners that the owners seem to love? and maybe part of the reason for that is feedback from competent drivers?
 

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nothing bold about that. why is it so hard for you guys to accept that cars change during development and in response to feedback.
the race cars that we drive change significantly over the years as we get to know them better.
The car was a launch. Not a development car.

Hence my question?

I’m well aware of changes made along the way for issues. I’m asking what the issues were that warranted the “so called” change.
 
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