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No, adaptive damping system.
Yes I think Shmee didn’t explain it well .... :(

Grip is enhanced by continuously variable, twin-valve hydraulic dampers that feature individual compression and rebound characteristics. Single-stiffness springs and mechanical anti-roll bars are used, in combination with a new iteration of McLaren’s Proactive Damping Control system. Developed from the technology pioneered on the McLaren GT, PDC II is the most sophisticated example yet of the Optimal Control Theory software algorithm first developed for the 720S.

The Proactive Damping Control system uses inputs from sensors to ‘read’ the road rather than reacting to camera-based information. Feedback from four wheel accelerometers, three body accelerometers and two pressure sensors per damper – as well as multiple sensors that measure steering angle, vehicle speed, yaw rate and lateral acceleration – is processed in less than two milliseconds to ensure the vehicle state is optimized for outstanding levels of control.

As acceleration, braking and cornering continually alter, and the road surface constantly changes, so Proactive Damping Control interprets data and uses its digital models to predict the perfect damping response. The regulation of the body’s movement is tailored for occupant comfort, but the vertical load and contact patch variation is optimized to enhance grip levels by ensuring each tire remains more consistently in touch with the road surface.”
 

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Yes I think Shmee didn’t explain it well .... :(

Grip is enhanced by continuously variable, twin-valve hydraulic dampers that feature individual compression and rebound characteristics. Single-stiffness springs and mechanical anti-roll bars are used, in combination with a new iteration of McLaren’s Proactive Damping Control system. Developed from the technology pioneered on the McLaren GT, PDC II is the most sophisticated example yet of the Optimal Control Theory software algorithm first developed for the 720S.

The Proactive Damping Control system uses inputs from sensors to ‘read’ the road rather than reacting to camera-based information. Feedback from four wheel accelerometers, three body accelerometers and two pressure sensors per damper – as well as multiple sensors that measure steering angle, vehicle speed, yaw rate and lateral acceleration – is processed in less than two milliseconds to ensure the vehicle state is optimized for outstanding levels of control.

As acceleration, braking and cornering continually alter, and the road surface constantly changes, so Proactive Damping Control interprets data and uses its digital models to predict the perfect damping response. The regulation of the body’s movement is tailored for occupant comfort, but the vertical load and contact patch variation is optimized to enhance grip levels by ensuring each tire remains more consistently in touch with the road surface.”
I wonder if the computing power and response time of adaptive dampers have advanced far enough to make the Tenneco hydraulic suspension obsolete, or at least not worth the cost/benefit tradeoff. What response time is needed to mimic the both the side to side and front to rear balancing abilities of the hydraulic suspension, and if that has already been achieved.
 

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I wonder if the computing power and response time of adaptive dampers have advanced far enough to make the Tenneco hydraulic suspension obsolete, or at least not worth the cost/benefit tradeoff. I wonder what response time is needed to mimic the both the side to side and front to rear balancing abilities of the hydraulic suspension, and if that has already been achieved.
Yes the Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC) uses electric signal damper coupling and has been improved over several iterations. The improved bus systems in the Artura might be used in a similar manner — will be interesting to see some reviews and test results.

 

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McLaren Deliveries Delayed in US

By: Chris Bruce
They'll still be on sale later this year.
There's bad news for folks wanting to experience the new McLaren Artura because the British automaker has to delay the supercar's launch. The problem is "software supplier-related issues," according to Automotive News. The first deliveries in the US should now be in late August or early September.
……
 

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I checked with my dealer yesterday. Looks like if you order now you get a car late Dec or more likely in Jan. Really not bad at all given the delays in almost every single car out there.

I've seen it enough and I'm about to place my order. Going thru the options right now. Options are rater simple (unlike 911's). The biggest choice seems to be body color and option of black or colored roof.
 

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The Artura uses MC-C Pirelli tires, MC for McLaren brand and the -C for the Pirelli Cyber Tire ‘chip’ (blue tooth connect) sensor insert.

Hopefully Cyber TPMS sensors will be available for purchase from Pirelli/McLaren and other distributors, and that the c-sensors can be installed on another manufacturers tire and function with the Artura system.

Goodyear Supercar 3R, Michelin Cup2 ….. for example

Is this too much to hope for?? :)
 

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The Artura uses MC-C Pirelli tires, MC for McLaren brand and the -C for the Pirelli Cyber Tire ‘chip’ (blue tooth connect) sensor insert.

Hopefully Cyber TPMS sensors will be available for purchase from Pirelli/McLaren and other distributors, and that the c-sensors can be installed on another manufacturers tire and function with the Artura system.

Goodyear Supercar 3R, Michelin Cup2 ….. for example

Is this too much to hope for?? :)
yes. Actually might work with Michelin Cup 2 Connects, but will depend on McLaren form factor. Hopefully they chose industry standard versus bespoke
 

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yes. Actually might work with Michelin Cup 2 Connects, but will depend on McLaren form factor. Hopefully they chose industry standard versus bespoke
Yes I have Michelin Connect. But have not seen any information on a standard mounting for this tire chip technology.
 

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Would be good to have some clarification from McLaren on whether these sensors are interchangeable with other tires. And if the Artura system will work with Michelin Connect tire sensors.
 

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Wonder if the Artura could qualify for the California HOV lane sticker as a TZEV (transitional zero emission vehicle) I see many manufacturers have submitted for the CARB certification.

“Auto manufacturers may email CARB the emissions certification Executive Order and a VIN decoder, if a presumed or approved eligible vehicle is not yet listed on this page.”
 

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Talking about the sensors -
“Pirelli has here embedded them in the construction of the tire”
Hmmm? Read some comments View article comments
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ARSTECHNICA
Pirelli puts a wireless sensor in its new tire for the McLaren Artura
By Jonathan M. Gitlin
06/1/2021
When the McLaren Artura reaches the road later this year, it will do so riding on the world's first "Cyber Tires." Made by Pirelli, the tires feature an evolution of the tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS) that are now fitted to new cars. Normally, those sensors are in a car's wheels, but Pirelli has here embedded them in the construction of the tire, where they measure pressure, temperature, and acceleration.

That little snippet of information from the Artura press briefing left me intrigued, if a little skeptical. So I reached out to Pirelli to see if it could convince me that smart tires are a good idea.


"Now we have the technology to install at industrial level a sensor inside the tire and, most of all, integrate the sensor into the car itself," said Piero Misani, Pirelli's senior VP of R&D. "You can put in a sensor, you can put in an app [linked to a tire], but this is not a dialogue between the tire and the car. That is something that is a standalone system. With the McLaren Artura, we believe that we'll be the first to fully integrate a sensor in the tire with the car's electronics."

The idea dates back a few years to when Pirelli was thinking about ways to improve tire-pressure monitoring. "They took a quite ambitious choice to put a sensor in the tire because this is where you get most of the information. If you want to really extract information from the ground, the only point which is touching is really the [contact] patch area," said Corrado Rocca, Pirelli's head of R&D.

Rocca and Misani see the potential for tires to act as yet another distributed sensor platform, crowdsourcing data about the road conditions to other cars and to the layer of connected infrastructure that we're told is just beyond the horizon. At a recent CES, Pirelli demonstrated this idea with a Cyber Tire that could warn other road users if it encountered hydroplaning, for example. But it turns out that the Cyber Tire might have practical benefits right now.
“For the first time, the car knows which tire is mounted, which means that this applies to all the electronic systems in the car," Rocca explained.

Right now, a car's TPMS can tell if pressures and temperatures are within an optimum window, but the car has no way of knowing whether it's fitted with (for example) summer tires versus winter tires. A car that knows for sure what tires it's fitted with could have quite different mapping for some of its subsystems depending on what those tires are.

Misani offers up the example of anti-lock brakes. "ABS braking is not strictly linked only to the grip of the tire itself, but it's also connected to the dynamic response of the tire because the tuning of the ABS is linked to the stiffness of the tire in torsional mode, for example, and a winter tread pattern and a winter tire are definitely different from a summer one today," Misani told me. Future iterations of the Cyber Tire may also modify ABS or traction control maps based on the wear level of the tire, although Misani said that was still a work in progress.
As you might expect, the tires communicate with the rest of the Artura via Bluetooth Low Energy. And low-energy consumption was definitely a priority for Pirelli. Eventually, the tires might be able to power themselves, converting some kinetic energy to electricity with each wheel revolution. For now, the sensor is battery-powered and weighs about 10 g (0.3 oz).

"And this has been quite a challenge, because, you know, the Artura is a 330 km/h [205 mph] car, which means that the centripetal force—every time you go one revolution, you have over 3,500 Gs of shock to the sensor, to the battery," Rocco said. "We very carefully dimensioned the power consumption to be used only when it's needed. For instance when you transmit, you switch on the radio; when you acquire, you switch off the radio and just use other parts of the circuit."

Battery life is optimized to the specific tire—a performance tire fitted to a supercar like the Artura will have a shorter life than a set of all-seasons fitted to a family sedan.
At end of life, there's no special recycling of the sensors; they meet the same fate as the rest of the tire, whether that's a date with the chipper, retirement as part of a tire barrier at a race track, or maybe even incorporated into an Earthship.

View article comments

 

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This will make things interesting when it's time to switch tires and go to the track. I wonder if the car will still have the ability to communicate with tpms sensors? Or will these chips be available to somehow install inside a different tire? I just noticed that some one else posted a similar thought earlier in the thread, I guess I'm not the only one wondering about this!
 

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This will make things interesting when it's time to switch tires and go to the track. I wonder if the car will still have the ability to communicate with tpms sensors? Or will these chips be available to somehow install inside a different tire? I just noticed that some one else posted a similar thought earlier in the thread, I guess I'm not the only one wondering about this!
Yes it would be good if McLaren/Pirelli issued a clear statement (ideally with photos) showing how customers can install Cyber sensor chips on other non Cyber tires. And also inform potential Artura customers on where the sensor chips can be purchased.
At this time Tire Rack shows tires for Artura that are correct sized but don’t have Cyber sensors on the tires or sensors for sale ….
Getting stuck with Cyber tire shortages and delivery delays would/will be miserable … :(
 

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After reading more on the cyber tire, it appears that it’s an embedded chip, not removable nor replaceable. Each chip will have a tire model and serial ID so that the tire can be tracked as well as allow the car to determine what kind of tire is actually in use on the car (for possible fine tuning of TC and suspensions controls). That’s much different than the Michelin Connect tires. Also means shortages are a real possibility, and an inability to go to a different unless some sort of TPMS can still be used without too much trouble.
 

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A whole new issue, will be interesting to see how this develops. Will such tech spread to mainstream cars? There will have to be some sort of intercompatibility.

I bet a large percentage of those who purchase new Arturas will trade cars before tire replacement comes up. Will be more of an issue for the second hand buyers.
 

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After reading more on the cyber tire, it appears that it’s an embedded chip, not removable nor replaceable. Each chip will have a tire model and serial ID so that the tire can be tracked as well as allow the car to determine what kind of tire is actually in use on the car (for possible fine tuning of TC and suspensions controls). That’s much different than the Michelin Connect tires. Also means shortages are a real possibility, and an inability to go to a different unless some sort of TPMS can still be used without too much trouble.
The use of the term embedded may be causing some confusion. We need further clarification - best would be photos :)
———————-
Something like this ?
https://www.amazon.com/BARTUN-Bluetooth-Monitoring-Real-time-Temperature/dp/B07TB3GZF8
 

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The use of the term embedded may be causing some confusion. We need further clarification - best would be photos :)
———————-
Something like this ?
https://www.amazon.com/BARTUN-Bluetooth-Monitoring-Real-time-Temperature/dp/B07TB3GZF8
It's more than just the word, it how's it used. A tidbit of information is how the manufacturer can use the chip to track the tire, and why the battery life is so important, as well as the car being able to adjust the esc to match the type of tire installed. The manufacturer can't use the chip to track model of tire and serial number of the actual tire if the chip can be swapped between tires, and the car itself can't determine what model of tire is on the car if the chip can be swapped (e.g. can't tell is Torfeo R's or Pzero's are installed).

Edit add: Forgot to mention battery life is a lot less important if the chip can be easily replaced, like a standard TPMS sensor. They don't go into huge detail about battery longevity and power usage for TPMS's because of how easy they are to replace/swap. Here, they are discussing how important it was for them to work on battery usage, and how often that chip communicates with the car will be specific to the tire.

Finally, there is this: "At end of life, there's no special recycling of the sensors; they meet the same fate as the rest of the tire, whether that's a date with the chipper, retirement as part of a tire barrier at a race track, or maybe even incorporated into an Earthship."

The chip gets discarded with the tire.

All that definitely says these chips are not replaceable/swappable.
 

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Sounds like may be a problem if you dont like the Pirelli tyres and immediately switch to Michelin cup2 as soon as possible.
 
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