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More from Henry Catchpole

 

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Wow, we posted that simultaneously!
 

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I have always been curious as to the percentage of super car buyers who regularly (10 times or more per year) track their cars. My intuitive guess would be less than 10%. If that number is accurate, for the overwhelming majority of super car owners, how a car performs in street driving is of pre-eminent importance. For those who rarely or never track their cars, is it then sensible to sacrifice road performance by purchasing a track focused car?
 

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I have always been curious as to the percentage of super car buyers who regularly (10 times or more per year) track their cars. My intuitive guess would be less than 10%. If that number is accurate, for the overwhelming majority of super car owners, how a car performs in street driving is of pre-eminent importance. For those who rarely or never track their cars, is it then sensible to sacrifice road performance by purchasing a track focused car?
I unfortunately can't seem to squeeze in many track days and usually when I do I'm not driving my own car. However I've come to find out I want the rawest driving experience possible and will give up street comfort for that. If I could make street legal a GT3 racing car I would! The noises and discomfort is all part of the thrill. It makes driving 25mph an event. Yeah it may get old quick but as mentioned there are plenty of other choices for street comfort.
 

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I have always been curious as to the percentage of super car buyers who regularly (10 times or more per year) track their cars. My intuitive guess would be less than 10%. If that number is accurate, for the overwhelming majority of super car owners, how a car performs in street driving is of pre-eminent importance. For those who rarely or never track their cars, is it then sensible to sacrifice road performance by purchasing a track focused car?
Max 10% ... and if talking hypercars probably 1-2% ... only Senna seems to be a bit of exception but that car was really made with track driving in mind ...
 

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I unfortunately can't seem to squeeze in many track days and usually when I do I'm not driving my own car. However I've come to find out I want the rawest driving experience possible and will give up street comfort for that. If I could make street legal a GT3 racing car I would! The noises and discomfort is all part of the thrill. It makes driving 25mph an event. Yeah it may get old quick but as mentioned there are plenty of other choices for street comfort.
I whole heartily agree. A super car for me should be an occasion everytime you get behind the wheel. It should entertain, engage and induce an adrenaline rush. It is for these very sentiments, that I anxiously await the arrival of the 765.
 

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I unfortunately can't seem to squeeze in many track days and usually when I do I'm not driving my own car. However I've come to find out I want the rawest driving experience possible and will give up street comfort for that. If I could make street legal a GT3 racing car I would! The noises and discomfort is all part of the thrill. It makes driving 25mph an event. Yeah it may get old quick but as mentioned there are plenty of other choices for street comfort.
This right here. Exactly how I feel.
 

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I have always been curious as to the percentage of super car buyers who regularly (10 times or more per year) track their cars. My intuitive guess would be less than 10%. If that number is accurate, for the overwhelming majority of super car owners, how a car performs in street driving is of pre-eminent importance. For those who rarely or never track their cars, is it then sensible to sacrifice road performance by purchasing a track focused car?
Probably less than 1% track their car once per year, let alone 10 times. I'm sure if everyone had a Monticello Motor Club near by it would be a lot more common, but I believe those sort of places are few and far between. There really aren't that many tracks in general and they usually aren't open to whoever wants to track their car any given day like a golf course or anything. It's just a lot of effort to track a car unless you live near one of the major tracks that's open more regularly.

Imagine you live 2-3 hours away, you have to commit to it a while in advanced so you get a spot, and you want to run track oriented rubber. It's quite a hassle for most people I think.
 

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I have always been curious as to the percentage of super car buyers who regularly (10 times or more per year) track their cars. My intuitive guess would be less than 10%. If that number is accurate, for the overwhelming majority of super car owners, how a car performs in street driving is of pre-eminent importance. For those who rarely or never track their cars, is it then sensible to sacrifice road performance by purchasing a track focused car?
Yeah I used to track my 675LT a lot before the warranty expired. Now, I just don't due to the cost associated with something that goes boom. I daily drive a 911 GT3 Touring, so I'm used to hard riding cars normally. The LT is perfect for weekend trips or drives with friends and honestly isn't bad in terms of comfort. I see people buying track focused cars for the same reasons a lot of people buy ARs or super expensive watches - it's either for the capability when you won't use it or its for the craftsmanship that sets it apart.
 

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I have always been curious as to the percentage of super car buyers who regularly (10 times or more per year) track their cars. My intuitive guess would be less than 10%. If that number is accurate, for the overwhelming majority of super car owners, how a car performs in street driving is of pre-eminent importance. For those who rarely or never track their cars, is it then sensible to sacrifice road performance by purchasing a track focused car?
I took the Pista out to the track this past week and it was a blast. I plan to do a lot more of this next year as well. Problem is that I have too many hobbies - golf, offshore fishing and cars. Only so much time. I cant wait to do back to back runs with the 765 and the Pista.
 

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I took the Pista out to the track this past week and it was a blast. I plan to do a lot more of this next year as well. Problem is that I have too many hobbies - golf, offshore fishing and cars. Only so much time. I cant wait to do back to back runs with the 765 and the Pista.
two of the best cars money can buy. I’ll be curious to hear your comparisons.
 

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lets hope they learned their lesson. The “R” models are insanity in terms of value destruction. Mclaren..... Just, say, no.
They are kind of following the 911 ethos.

911S________ GT3____ GT3RS
911 turbo____ GT2____ GT2RS
570S________ 600LT____ 620R
720_________ 765LT____ 780R
 

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This is almost correct, I believe, based on McLaren's own percentage-based numbers, though they have never quoted a 150 mph downforce number as far as I know. Following McLaren's downforce percentage increases (at 300 KPH / 186 MPH) and using two significant digits for rounding...

MP4-12C was rated at 120 kg
650S - 24% more than 12C = 150 kg
720S - 50% more than 650S = 220 kg
765LT - 25% more than 720S = 280 kg

BONUS: 675LT - 40% more than 650S = 200 kg

So if we scale off of the speed using the fact that downforce is proportional to the square of velocity, 150 mph would yield a downforce of ~180 kg based on the 280 kg @ 186 mph figure.

As I said, close.

For anyone interested in calculating the approximate downforce at a given speed (at least to first order), use the following formula:

Est. DF = Ref. DF * (Est. Speed / Ref. Speed)^2

Est. DF = estimated downforce
Est. speed = speed at which you want to know the downforce
Ref. DF = known downforce at a known speed
Ref. speed = speed at which you know the downforce
Are people doing a lot of 150mph turns where this is actually helpful? I have a couple of bends that are more mild kinks than turns, where I'm trucking between 120-130mph at Monticello. The rest youre like at 40-80mph. Perhaps they are more relevant on tracks like Nurburgring?
 

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Are people doing a lot of 150mph turns where this is actually helpful? I have a couple of bends that are more mild kinks than turns, where I'm trucking between 120-130mph at Monticello. The rest youre like at 40-80mph. Perhaps they are more relevant on tracks like Nurburgring?
200 kg at 150 mph is 57 kg at 80 mph. That's what a GTC-200 wing does at that speed. Ask any S2000 driver if having that wing vs no wing makes a difference.
 

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125lbs. I could just sit someone next to me and achieve that. :D
And add 125 pounds of extra inertia (and probably screaming). The beauty of aero downforce. Depending on the location of Cp, will make the car more stable as well. This car will be doing 150++ mph on a bunch of straights. That downforce helps a lot with initial brake force
 
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