Formula 1, 2019 - Page 37 - McLaren Life
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post #541 of 664 Old 04-17-2019, 12:05 PM
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The Lance Armstrong who for years insisted (and sued anyone who suggested otherwise) he was completely innocent of any illegal substance use who not just beat but crushed all his major competitors in the TdF, every one of which I believe having been found to have been on the sauce in the years that followed and long before Armstrong fessed up to Oprah......?

I agree the regulation of cycling (and a lot of other sports tbh) is a mess, especially wrt to exemptions as you mentioned but I think it's much more clearcut in cycling because it's obvious people are actually cheating most of the time (and certainly in the Armstrong years).

Also with regards to Ferrari actively cheating in connivance with the FIA and having a veto over rules they didn't like - is it still cheating/blameworthy when everyone else knows they are doing so but still were happy to sign up to compete against Ferrari on that basis....?
Re Armstrong, one should not conflate the doping issue with the matter of how Armstrong treated other people (including but not only the way he handled people who accused him of doping). Armstrong's choice to use banned substances was no different from the same choice made by Riis, Ullrich, Museeuw, Pantani, Zabel, Virenque, Hincapie, Hamilton, Landis, Zulle, Di Luca, Valverde, Contador, Rasmussen, Chiappucci, Vinokourov and so many others. I have no doubt that the venerated Miguel Indurain and my favourite Tony Rominger did the same, but they retired shortly before testing became more rigorous and sophisticated.

That all the top riders of the '90s (and most of them in previous decades) doped is one thing. That the guy who won the most Tours de France while doped also treated his accusers badly is separate. Armstrong's treatment of others was simply unacceptable; his and everyone else's doping a more ambiguous matter.


Re the Ferrari situation, I'm not sure one could say that the other teams were "happy to sign up on that basis". If you're a Formula One racing team, and slowly but surely you realise that it's not a case of a rival's occasional cheating slipping through the net, but rather that the regulator is actively assisting that rival in breaking the rules, should you leave Formula One altogether? What do you do then? There was no alternative form of European-based racing that attracted anything like the money that F1 did, so to leave it and, for example, switch to DTM or sports cars would have necessitated making 75% of your staff redundant if not going out of business. And of course it was only in the latter stages of the Mosley Reign of Terror that (as far as we know) he was at his most corrupt. By that point, the teams were locked into a Concorde Agreement that they had signed years earlier.

Even if the teams knew everything that was going on and nonetheless accepted Ferrari's illicit advantages as the price of being in the game, most of us fans didn't. We were cheated too.
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post #542 of 664 Old 04-17-2019, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
 
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GPFANS
Ferrari mirroring Mercedes with upgrade package
17 April 2019
by Matthew Scott

Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto says that the Scuderia are taking cues from Mercedes' W10 as they look to bring upgrades to their car which will help in their battle against the Silver Arrows. Ferrari's bold aero design for 2019 turned heads in pre-season, but has not delivered consistently yet on-track.


Both Ferrari and Alfa Romeo came up with front-wing designs markedly different to most of the rest of the field, with the new regulations for 2019 sending teams down differing paths.

However, Binotto says the rear wing will soon be changed, with Ferrari looking to their rivals for inspiration.

"A rear wing like the one Mercedes has is coming," he is quoted by Germany's Auto Motor und Sport.


Mercedes have taken one-two finishes in each of the opening three races of the season, despite Ferrari holding a distinct advantage on the straights.

Former Mercedes driver Nico Rosberg said during the Chinese Grand Prix, which saw Sebastian Vettel and Charles Leclerc finish third and fifth, that he had spoken to members of the Ferrari team who claimed that the new rear wing would be in place for the Spanish Grand Prix.

Auto Motor und Sport have reported that the changes may also necessitate a change to the front wing on the SF90 in order to unlock its true potential.
https://www.gpfans.com/en/articles/3...grade-package/
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post #543 of 664 Old 04-17-2019, 03:00 PM Thread Starter
 
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AUTOSPORT
Binotto hopes Alfa will take new Ferrari F1 control electronics soon
By Roberto Chinchero, Scott Mitchell @ScottAutosport
April 17th 2019

Ferrari hopes Alfa Romeo will switch to new control electronics as soon as possible following the failures that have hit Charles Leclerc and Antonio Giovinazzi in successive Formula 1 races.


Leclerc lost a certain victory in the Bahrain Grand Prix on only his second start for Ferrari when a short circuit within an injection system control unit caused his engine to drop a cylinder.

As reported by Autosport, in response to this Ferrari brought a different specification of control electronics to last weekend's Chinese Grand Prix, which the works team and its customer Haas opted to install.

But its other customer Alfa Romeo did not fit the new control electronics, and Giovinazzi missed qualifying after suffering the same failure as Leclerc at the start of Q1.

Ferrari team principal Mattia Binotto confirmed: "We changed it because on Charles' car it failed in Barhain.

"We know that with the initial spec of the control units we had some reliability issues so we changed it simply for a better unit.

"So, we change it on Seb [Vettel's car] as well, for precaution, we had to change it on Charles' because it was failed, and we asked our customer teams as well to change them.

"Haas did it, Alfa didn't do it for installation issues, they felt [it was] too complicated, too risky for the change they had to do on installation.

"As a result, Antonio Giovinazzi had an issue again in quali.

"So, hopefully it will be changed as soon as possible there as well."


Giovinazzi was given a fresh example of the old-spec control electronics for the race and finished 15th.

Alfa team principal Frederic Vasseur took responsibility for the decision not to change the control electronics for China.

He admitted that he had his fingers crossed during the race that the same problem would not strike Kimi Raikkonen when he was running in the points.

Raikkonen went on to finish ninth
https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/14...ectronics-soon
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post #544 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 01:50 AM
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Re Armstrong, one should not conflate the doping issue with the matter of how Armstrong treated other people (including but not only the way he handled people who accused him of doping). Armstrong's choice to use banned substances was no different from the same choice made by Riis, Ullrich, Museeuw, Pantani, Zabel, Virenque, Hincapie, Hamilton, Landis, Zulle, Di Luca, Valverde, Contador, Rasmussen, Chiappucci, Vinokourov and so many others. I have no doubt that the venerated Miguel Indurain and my favourite Tony Rominger did the same, but they retired shortly before testing became more rigorous and sophisticated.

That all the top riders of the '90s (and most of them in previous decades) doped is one thing. That the guy who won the most Tours de France while doped also treated his accusers badly is separate. Armstrong's treatment of others was simply unacceptable; his and everyone else's doping a more ambiguous matter.
I don't think I am conflating the doping with Armstrong's behaviour (but I would say that wouldn't I ).

however I simply cannot see how it's an ambiguous issue wrt to doping. The fact that everyone else was doping is neither here nor there about making it any less clearcut they were very obviously breaking the rules. Armstrong's self serving excuse of 'wanting to level the playing field' is risible imo as no one starts to dope thinking they are only going to dope to the same extent as everyone else but dopes to the maximum they think they are going to need to win a race. As I said, Armstrong didn't just beat but crushed a whole load of known dopers and for years maintained he was whiter than white - I wouldn't exactly be minded to take anything he said without a huge pinch of salt.
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post #545 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 12:16 PM
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I don't think I am conflating the doping with Armstrong's behaviour (but I would say that wouldn't I ).

however I simply cannot see how it's an ambiguous issue wrt to doping. The fact that everyone else was doping is neither here nor there about making it any less clearcut they were very obviously breaking the rules. Armstrong's self serving excuse of 'wanting to level the playing field' is risible imo as no one starts to dope thinking they are only going to dope to the same extent as everyone else but dopes to the maximum they think they are going to need to win a race. As I said, Armstrong didn't just beat but crushed a whole load of known dopers and for years maintained he was whiter than white - I wouldn't exactly be minded to take anything he said without a huge pinch of salt.
Yes, he lied through his teeth. All the other riders lied as emphatically as he did, but he lied more often because he was the biggest star and he got interviewed more often.
I was not suggesting that there is any doubt as to whether, if the rules ban taking EPO but a rider takes EPO, that rider is breaking the rules. Of course he is.
The ambiguity derives from whether, if there was an understanding broadly within the sport that the top riders "all" doped, it was wrong to dope. Was it immoral, or was it rather a pact that one made with the Devil? It was unfair to all the riders who (it was presumed, perhaps wrongly) were never going to be among the top riders and therefore never doped, but if nobody in the Tour ever doped, it is conceivable that the same riders would have won, just with smaller gaps to the riders who didn't dope. You could have put Armstong and Ullrich on bread and water for a month and still they would have been damn fast on a bike.

If one guy was born and raised in the Andes and for that reason has a natural hematocrit level of 0.55, which gives him a huge advantage, is it fair to tell somebody born in Amstersdam with a natural hematocrit level of 0.35, who could never train himself to a level above maybe 0.45, that he is not allowed to raise his level to that of the Andean?

The irony is that the original justification for banning most use of performance-boosting substances was athletes' safety - the wrong dose of the wrong additive could be fatal. In the case of Armstrong's team (and some others), the taking of banned substances was prescribed, supervised and systematised by doctors. AFAIK, under the supervision of professionals the practice of doping was less dangerous than the sport itself was.

It would be fascinating to learn what percentage of the peloton in 1998 or 2005 was completely clean, and among them how the most successful riders fared relative to the dopers. But I have a feeling we're never going to know....
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post #546 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 07:37 PM
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To get back to F1 after the mini TdF tangent

https://motorsport.tech/formula-1/f1...ig-scarborough

thoughts?
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post #547 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 10:03 PM Thread Starter
 
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To get back to F1 after the mini TdF tangent

https://motorsport.tech/formula-1/f1...ig-scarborough

thoughts?
Nothing outrageous in what Scarborough writes. Except perhaps the increase/growth in FIA rule setters and FIA R&D expense. Hope that the greater reliance on underbody downforce does not cause any unexpected safety problems when a car flys under rough conditions or impact with another car — but they will have thought of that.
It appears that the Brawn goal is to bunch up the pack to give at least the TV appearance of closer racing — but not disturb the finishing/winning order/ranking of the top three or the WDC/WCC ? I guess that is the way to sell it to the top teams ….
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post #548 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 10:19 PM Thread Starter
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post #549 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 10:39 PM
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IMO the problem with the drive-thru penalty that Kvyat received is that it wasn't severe enough. IIRC he was still well ahead of both Mac's even after taking his drive-thru punishment.



Now I know that the Mac wasn't very competitive in China, but it just doesn't seem fair that you can damage two cars, serve your penalty and still be better off than those cars you've impacted...

Catch me at: [URL=https://www.instagram.com/f1_oov/?hl=en[/URL]
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post #550 of 664 Old 04-18-2019, 11:03 PM Thread Starter
 
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.......................
Now I know that the Mac wasn't very competitive in China, but it just doesn't seem fair that you can damage two cars, serve your penalty and still be better off than those cars you've impacted...
Yes the two car team ‘take out’ probably contributed to the penalty severity.
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post #551 of 664 Old 04-24-2019, 01:57 PM Thread Starter
 
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by thejudge13
HONDA FINALLY CONFIRM BIG RUMOUR
April 24, 2019

This morning a press release popped into TJ13s inbox from Honda confirming a story we published last week.

It seems that Honda are indeed planning to bring a new engine for Baku and despite the Japanese conservatism in their statement, the power hike is significant, if you believe Red Bull.

TOYOHARU TANABE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR, HONDA RACING F1:

The fourth round of the championship takes place on the fastest street circuit on the calendar. The key features of the Baku track are the main straight, which is over 2 kilometres in length and the many right angle corners, typical of a city circuit.

From a PU point of view, the long straight means energy management is an important factor and we will use the lessons we learned here last year when it comes to optimising our settings.

This weekend, we will introduce the Spec 2 version of our internal combustion engine (ICE) across all four cars right from the start of the weekend. One of the reasons for bringing it to this race is that we found that Kvyat’s PU problem in China was down to a quality control issue.

The main benefits of Spec 2 are improved durability and life and better reliability. It also offers a slight improvement in performance.


Marko: Honda big power upgrade for Baku
15th March 2019

Although Red Bull and some pundits declared that China was a turnaround for the troubled Red Bull Racing RB15 car, a machine not easy to setup aerodynamically according to bosses, it seems that the chassis is still short of its rivals Mercedes and Ferrari.

Indeed after the Grand Prix yesterday, Christian Horner declared that race victories are unlikely for this season and that their focus was to close the gap on the front runners.


“The truth is that we have no target for the number of wins. Our goal is to reduce the gap to the leaders,” admits Horner after both he and Marko said that Red Bull has an “aerodynamic problem” and they “hope” that Adrian Newey (chief designer) can come up with a solution. Newey himself goes onto admit that the car isn’t correct. (READ MORE)

“At the moment the maximum we can do is score points,” Max Verstappen told Ziggo Sport after the race.

The official line for Red Bull currently is not to blame Honda, bulking a very long established Red Bull tradition (Renault!). They claim that engine power is not the problem for Red Bull this season. The Honda engine they say holds its own for the time being despite the numbers showing a near identical performance delta in previous seasons with Renault. Not that truth plays a part in public media politics in Formula 1.
https://thejudge13.com/2019/04/24/ma...rade-for-baku/
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post #552 of 664 Old 04-25-2019, 05:43 PM Thread Starter
 
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Open the link — the video at the end brings it all back! How boring F1 is …. haha


https://www.formula1.com/en/latest/a...ys8LbjOl4.html

FORMULA 1
Thursday’s Hot Topic: Will Baku spring a third successive surprise?

Senior writer
by Lawrence Barretto

“Everything is possible.” Pierre Gasly neatly summed up the opportunity the Azerbaijan Grand Prix, held on Baku’s majestic street circuit, offers drivers. After the damp squib that was the inaugural race, the last two editions have been absolute thrillers. And after a rather dour race in China, unsurprisingly much of the paddock chatter on Thursday centred on whether or not Baku could give F1 a boost with another classic…

It says a lot about the unpredictability of Baku that only one of the three drivers to have started on pole on the street circuit have managed to make it to the podium. There have been three different winners in as many years, while grid position isn’t that crucial, considering Daniel Ricciardo vaulted from 10th to take victory in 2017.

In the last three seasons, there have only been five podiums scored by drivers not behind the wheel of a Mercedes, Ferrari or Red Bull – and three of them were at Baku. Sergio Perez is the most prolific podium finisher here with two, while his new Racing Point team mate Lance Stroll took the other in 2017.

2018 Azerbaijan GP
Given the gap between Mercedes, Ferrari and Red Bull to the rest remains sizeable, a crazy race in Baku represents the best chance the remaining seven teams have of sampling champagne on the podium this season. It’s why, as Carlos Sainz says, midfield teams need to focus on “getting the basics right”.

“It’s an important weekend, especially to make sure you’re on top of all the reliability issues and to make sure you have a smooth weekend in general,” said the McLaren driver. “Normally, that gives you a good reward here. You don’t even need to be the fastest midfield car to score a very good result. You just need to get the basics right in Baku, and normally there’s good points for that.”

Mistakes are common, even five-time world champion Lewis Hamilton getting caught out in the past – and that can make for an intriguing qualifying session and race

Baku is one of those circuits that demands your attention. All of your attention. All of the time. At 6.003km and 20 turns – though the last one is more of a kink – the Baku City Circuit blends a tight and twisty sector, with unforgiving barriers penning you tightly in around the picturesque Old Town, with sweeping high-speed sections.

That combination not only creates a challenge when choosing your set-up but also creates the conditions that usually require the Safety Car to be called into action – as has been the case in each of the last two editions. Mistakes are common, even five-time world champion Lewis Hamilton getting caught out in the past – and that can make for an intriguing qualifying session and race.

Formula One World Championship
“In terms of racing, it’s pretty intense,” said Red Bull’s Gasly. “It’s really easy to make a mistake as well. The probability to have a Safety Car is higher than on other tracks. Until the last few laps, everything is possible. Valtteri [Bottas] should have won the race, and nobody would expect he would blow the tyre in the last few laps. It’s a race where the focus needs to be 120% until the last corner, because everything is achievable.”

It’s perhaps no surprise that Perez has frequented the podium most often, the Mexican having proved across his eight-year F1 career that when things get crazy, he will get the job done and deliver more than his car deserves. His guile combined with the ability of Racing Point, formerly Force India, to nail the strategy is a package you want when it comes to the Azerbaijan Grand Prix.


“In general, it’s a circuit where the driver can make the difference, staying off the walls, making a clean race and maximising the strategy,” he said. “Racing has been definitely my strongest point. Come Sunday, the decisions about where to put myself, who to fight, when to push, when not to, have paid off in Baku and also in other tracks. Here especially I think the racing is so close together there are normally good opportunities. If there is a chaotic race, hopefully we’re there to take some good opportunities on Sunday.”

With a 2.1km straight, the wind often giving drivers a headache and the new regulations – that include a bigger DRS – allowing for closer racing and some stunning overtakes so far this year, there’s reason why there’s such an expectant vibe in Baku right now. At least we haven’t got long to wait to find out what is in store this year…
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post #553 of 664 Old 04-25-2019, 09:42 PM Thread Starter
 
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RACEFANS
McLaren Racing losses rise after Honda split

25th April 2019
by Dieter Rencken, Keith Collantine
McLaren Group Limited, the parent company of the Formula 1 team, has announced an increase in turnover from £870m in 2017 to £1,250m for last year, the first under a revised legal structure that brings the group’s three operating divisions – Automotive, Racing and Applied Technologies – under a single umbrella company.


However, despite an increase in global wholesale unit sales of 45% over 2017, the group suffered an overall operating deficit of almost £5m (compared to £43.4m in 2017). This was mainly due to an operational loss of £96m recorded by the Racing division – as predicted in our team budgets analysis last year – despite the sale of Heritage assets (historic race cars) valued at £10m.
In order to fund the restructure and enable Racing to continue its operations, the losses were covered by a combination of bonds, share dilution and shareholder underwrite.

The company’s collection numbers 148 F1 race cars, four F1 road cars, four historic vehicles, 20 racing monocoque chassis and two P1 cars, and is in the process of ‘rationalising’ the collection. The collection was valued at almost £60m at the end of last year.

The full-year 2018 results show that income of the McLaren Formula 1 team plunged from £209m in 2017 to £133m, although the actual costs of racing increased during the period – and hence the Group recorded the largest loss in its history.

The losses were driven by three primary factors: Loss of commercial income from Honda after its troubled engine supply contract was dissolved at the end of 2017; the loss of free engines, which were in turn replaced by Renault units on a customer supply arrangement; and an estimated £10m drop in the team’s share of Formula 1’s revenues (paid a year in arrears) after the team finished ninth in the 2017 constructors’ classification.

In order to fund the restructure of Racing last year, the Group raised £203.1m from billionaire businessman Michael Latifi by issuing new shares to his Nidala (BVI) Limited investment vehicle, as revealed by RaceFans.

The share issue provides Latifi, father of F2 racer and Williams F1 test driver Nicholas Latifi, with an effective 10 per cent stake in the company. The first tranche totalling £100m was received last year, a further £50m was injected in February this year, with the final amount due in May.

This investment is in addition to bonds raised in the City during 2017 to enable the Group to purchase the shares of previous CEO and Chairman Ron Dennis.

McLaren Automotive reported an increase in global wholesale unit sales of 45% over 2017, taking total unit sales close to the 5,000 mark and turnover of the division exceeding the billion-pound mark for the first time.

The company plans to introduce 18 new models or derivatives through to 2025 as part of its ‘Track25’ strategy, and plans to produce 6,000 units annually
https://www.racefans.net/2019/04/25/...r-honda-split/
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post #554 of 664 Old 04-25-2019, 10:16 PM
 
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The Latifi purchase is a concern.

As with Lance Stroll, a father handing his son an F1 driving gift could turn out to be a poisoned chalice for the young guys. The principle of Darwinian survival of the best applies to F1. Hubris to think that in your brood lies the great talent over all the many other potential drivers.

Schumacher is also a concern although at least he carries the genes.
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post #555 of 664 Old 04-25-2019, 11:14 PM Thread Starter
 
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The Latifi purchase is a concern.

As with Lance Stroll, a father handing his son an F1 driving gift could turn out to be a poisoned chalice for the young guys. The principle of Darwinian survival of the best applies to F1. Hubris to think that in your brood lies the great talent over all the many other potential drivers.

Schumacher is also a concern although at least he carries the genes.
Yes. F1 has a history of money buying a seat—gentlemen racers. Now the drivers of course have earned superlicences and significant driving experience so I'm somewhat ambivalent about the practice - which tends, lately, to be confined to non competitive Teams. Teams at the very top usually are not influenced by driver parent money offered to the team — they have their own money or significant sponsor money already and they also have access to top driver talent. In the Latifi case he purchased a 10% stake in the whole McLaren Group (not just F1) so I think his interest is in how the McLaren Company performs as a whole. We shall see ..
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