Formula 1, 2019 - Page 3 - McLaren Life
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post #31 of 689 Old 12-08-2018, 03:17 PM Thread Starter
 
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This Toet Sauber video was published in 2014. Difficult to believe McLaren would not have had access to similar capabilities — at very least rent time?


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post #32 of 689 Old 12-09-2018, 03:35 AM Thread Starter
 
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WHEELS

More F1 tech to hit the road
A look into how Formula One helped bring the Infiniti Project Black S to life
By Tim Ansell
November 28, 2018

Just 90 minutes after Nico Hülkenburg put his Renault Sport Formula One car’s strength and safety systems to the test as he flipped upside down on the opening lap of the Abu Dhabi 2018 Grand Prix earlier this week, his team-mate Carlos Sainz completed his last race for the team somewhat ironically with his best performance to date, finishing in sixth place behind two Mercedes, Ferrari and Max Verstappen’s Renault engined Red Bull.

Watching on from the pit garage was Renault Sport Racing’s Managing Director Mr. Cyril Abiteboul constantly scanning a myriad of data screens in front of him and maintaining control over the team of 60 engineers and technicians at the race track, whilst at Viry-Châtillon in France and Enstone in the UK, a further 36 engineers monitor the output from hundreds of data loggers located throughout the race car’s engine and chassis.

At first glance it might be difficult to imagine that the time, effort and enormous financial commitment needed to run an F1 team could be of benefit to Renault’s technology partners INFINITI, yet the Black S Project Car displayed at the Paris Motor Show in October 2018, is evidence that not only Formula One technology – in this case the dual MGU-H & MGU-K heat and kinetic energy recovery systems – could be utilised to create a powerful yet efficient performance car, but that techniques and processes used by the Renault Sport team could accelerate the development programme of the Black S.


“It is great to have the opportunity to demonstrate that all the investment in advanced technologies in F1 can have some form of relevance for consumer applications,” says Abiteboul. “There was a lot of criticism of the engine regulations which were introduced in 2014; everyone was complaining about the lack of noise, the cost, the complexity and so on. Now you could argue whether it was the right choice for Formula One but the reality is that it’s completely relevant, with regard to the direction that the world is taking due to the scarcity of fossil fuel and the limits on CO2 emissions,” added the Renault Sport Racing MD.


Tomasso Volpe, Director, Performance Projects and Motorpsort, INFINITI, chimes in. “In Paris we unveiled the running prototype so Black S is not a concept any more, it’s an actual car. Currently we have two chassis under development, the next step is testing on track to validate the technology and in 2019 selected media will also give feedback on the project.” That’s not the only tech they’re working with. “In addition to the 400hp of the donor car, a Q60 Red S, we have a further 163 hp due to the MGU-K which is 120kw, but what’s unique is that we have a dual recovery hybrid, which is the whole point of transferring the technology from F1.”

“We have two MGU-H instead of one, slightly different from Formula 1, and between them they recover a further 30Kw. Also we also chose to implement our F1 brake by wire technology which was needed to maximise the recovery from braking via the MGU-K. The battery is 400 volts, very strong, to allow the car to be driven for a long period,” Volpe adds.

Abiteboul further elaborates on the collaboration. “We would not have been thinking about this sort of collaboration with the old V8 or V10 which were great because they were very loud, very aspirational, but also had no real value from a business or technology perspective. It’s great to have, with this partnership with INFINITI, the opportunity to demonstrate that the partnership is reality, not just words or principal, but reality.”

“After all, what is an F1 team?” he asks. “It’s a particular group of people very competent at doing modelling, simulation and optimisation, plus proof of concept, very quickly and very efficiently, because time is money in any business. We could think that the end product may be expensive but in terms of cost efficiency and cost of the project - because the project was done in a very timely and efficient manner because that’s the way we are used to working in F1 - it’s actually very cost efficient for INFINITI. It’s been done by engineers that were ring fenced from the F1 programme but who remained part of the F1 programme therefore they were capable of leveraging synergies and expertise developed for F1 and Formula E. So you see the synergies of the Renault Nissan alliance are not just limited to road vehicles, they are also working in motorsport,” Abiteboul concludes.

Meanwhile, confirming that the car will be quick, Volpe adds that there’s going to be more to it than sheer pace. “We are positioning this car, not looking for brutal performance in terms of 0-100kph, though this will be credible at below four seconds - so still at the level of a high performance car - but what is unique is what we call the ‘smartness’ of the technology which is typical from Formula One. We have the possibility to have energy management which is flexible and gives three modes to the driver, in this case road, qualifying and race, copying in a more simplistic way what they can do in F1 with the energy management. The road drive is all about maximising the efficiency, the qualification mode gives the best lap time possible and the race mode gives sustainable performance. This is very important for us because with a dual recovery you have more energy recovered and then you have the possibility to create a product with sustainable performance.”

Project Black S is a window into Infiniti’s future portfolio, thanks to the partnership with Renault Sport Racing, taking in not just the performance but also the sophistication of Formula 1
https://wheels.ae/features/feature-s...o-hit-the-road
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post #33 of 689 Old 12-10-2018, 04:24 PM Thread Starter
 
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CRASH.NET
Ex-Porsche LMP1 chief Andreas Seidl set for senior McLaren F1 role
by Luke Smith
10 Dec 2018
Sources have indicated to Crash.net that former Porsche LMP1 chief Seidl will join McLaren in the near future, bolstering its F1 management team.

Former Porsche LMP1 chief Andreas Seidl is set to take up a senior role within McLaren’s Formula 1 operation in the near future, Crash.net understands.

Seidl oversaw Porsche’s return to the premier class of sports car racing in 2014 with the Porsche 919 Hybrid car that went on to win three consecutive 24 Hours of Le Mans from 2015 to 2017, as well as claiming every FIA World Endurance Championship LMP1 title in that period.


Porsche withdrew from LMP1 at the end of 2017 in order to shift its attention to its planned Formula E entry in 2019, which Seidl was set to lead as the marque's new overall head of motorsport.

However, Seidl suddenly left his Porsche last month after six years, and has since been linked with a move to an F1 team for 2019.
Sources have now indicated to Crash.net that Seidl is due to take up a senior position at McLaren in the near future, overseeing its F1 racing activities.

Seidl is poised to join a management team that was restructured in July following the departure of racing director Eric Boullier ahead of the British Grand Prix.

Zak Brown assumed the role of CEO of McLaren Racing, leading its management team, with Gil de Ferran becoming sporting director. James Key is set to join McLaren in 2019 as its new technical director, but Boullier’s role has not been directly filled.

Following a request for comment, a McLaren spokesperson told Crash.net: “With respect, our policy is to never comment on speculation.”

Seidl has experience in F1, having worked with BMW Sauber between 2006 and 2009. He then moved to BMW’s DTM team following the manufacturer’s exit from F1, helping lead its charge to the title upon returning to the touring car category in 2012.

Seidl worked with outgoing Toro Rosso F1 driver Brendon Hartley during his time at Porsche. Harley won two WEC drivers’ crowns and one Le Mans title working under Seidl, and spoke warmly of his former boss amid speculation of a move into F1 over the Abu Dhabi race weekend.

“I have a huge amount of respect for Andreas, I learned a lot from him,” Hartley said.

“He was definitely the best team principal I’ve ever worked with, and was an integral part of the LMP1 programme, and I really enjoyed working with him.

“I don’t know what his future is, but I really wish him all the best, and whatever it is, it’s fully deserved."

https://www.crash.net/f1/news/911615...formula-1-role
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post #34 of 689 Old 12-10-2018, 05:11 PM Thread Starter
 
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post #35 of 689 Old 12-10-2018, 11:12 PM
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CRASH.NET
Ex-Porsche LMP1 chief Andreas Seidl set for senior McLaren F1 role
by Luke Smith
10 Dec 2018
Sources have indicated to Crash.net that former Porsche LMP1 chief Seidl will join McLaren in the near future, bolstering its F1 management team.

Former Porsche LMP1 chief Andreas Seidl is set to take up a senior role within McLaren’s Formula 1 operation in the near future, Crash.net understands.

Seidl oversaw Porsche’s return to the premier class of sports car racing in 2014 with the Porsche 919 Hybrid car that went on to win three consecutive 24 Hours of Le Mans from 2015 to 2017, as well as claiming every FIA World Endurance Championship LMP1 title in that period.


Porsche withdrew from LMP1 at the end of 2017 in order to shift its attention to its planned Formula E entry in 2019, which Seidl was set to lead as the marque's new overall head of motorsport.

However, Seidl suddenly left his Porsche last month after six years, and has since been linked with a move to an F1 team for 2019.
Sources have now indicated to Crash.net that Seidl is due to take up a senior position at McLaren in the near future, overseeing its F1 racing activities.

Seidl is poised to join a management team that was restructured in July following the departure of racing director Eric Boullier ahead of the British Grand Prix.

Zak Brown assumed the role of CEO of McLaren Racing, leading its management team, with Gil de Ferran becoming sporting director. James Key is set to join McLaren in 2019 as its new technical director, but Boullier’s role has not been directly filled.

Following a request for comment, a McLaren spokesperson told Crash.net: “With respect, our policy is to never comment on speculation.”

Seidl has experience in F1, having worked with BMW Sauber between 2006 and 2009. He then moved to BMW’s DTM team following the manufacturer’s exit from F1, helping lead its charge to the title upon returning to the touring car category in 2012.

Seidl worked with outgoing Toro Rosso F1 driver Brendon Hartley during his time at Porsche. Harley won two WEC drivers’ crowns and one Le Mans title working under Seidl, and spoke warmly of his former boss amid speculation of a move into F1 over the Abu Dhabi race weekend.

“I have a huge amount of respect for Andreas, I learned a lot from him,” Hartley said.

“He was definitely the best team principal I’ve ever worked with, and was an integral part of the LMP1 programme, and I really enjoyed working with him.

“I don’t know what his future is, but I really wish him all the best, and whatever it is, it’s fully deserved."

https://www.crash.net/f1/news/911615...formula-1-role
Let us hope that this is not another hiring along the lines of Jost Capito - a great guy but there was no clear job for him to do.
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post #36 of 689 Old 12-11-2018, 03:02 AM Thread Starter
 
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Let us hope that this is not another hiring along the lines of Jost Capito - a great guy but there was no clear job for him to do.
Yes Capito got caught up in the Ron Dennis ouster. This time perhaps it depends upon who did the hiring — Mansour or Zak?
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post #37 of 689 Old 12-11-2018, 06:48 AM
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this story has been around for a couple of months I think..

I haven't been able to find out if it's true or not... but it would be good news in my view if it is..
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post #38 of 689 Old 12-11-2018, 06:06 PM
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Seidl would be an excellent hire by Mclaren if given the right backing imo. Big if though.
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post #39 of 689 Old 12-13-2018, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
 
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CITYA.M.
13 December 2018
by Michael Searles

Formula One teams face battle to keep attracting lucrative sponsors as major revenue stream takes hit

Independent teams like Williams depend heavily on sponsorship money but they have seen title sponsor Martini leave this year (Source: Getty)
The sponsorship landscape has changed significantly for Formula One teams over the past decade or so and it has been a change for the worse for most involved.


Revenue from sponsors has decreased by a quarter since 2007, falling from $1.01bn to $772.5m last season, according to data compiled by Formula Money.

In fact, there has been a steep decrease in sponsorship income over the past five years alone. Having rallied between 2011 and 2013 to more than £1bn again, it has since plummeted by over 25 per cent.

Year-on-year variations in the sources of sponsorship are inevitable as deals revolve around the teams and drivers involved, but the general trajectory has been downward as teams struggle to command the income the sport once delivered.

Telecommunications

A key factor in the overall decline has been a loss of funds from the telecommunications and technology sector, which peaked at $267.3m in 2007 but had decreased to $163.2m by 2010.

Despite a temporary respite after that, it has continued to slide since 2014 and contributed as little as $84.3m to teams in 2017.

It has suffered since Vodafone withdrew, having had spells with both Ferrari and McLaren. They paid the former $40m-per-year until teaming up with the latter in 2007, to whom they paid between $77m and $92m-per-year up until 2013 when they abandoned the sport altogether.

Similarly, Renault had backing from Spanish telecommunications giant Telefonica worth $25m annually until 2007, when they cut ties following the departure of double world champion Alonso, while Panasonic's $40m per-year-deal with Toyota ended when the team ceased to exist in 2010.

Tobacco

Teams were dealt a significant sponsorship blow just a few years earlier by the worldwide ban on tobacco advertising in sport, which had formerly been a main source of revenue in the 1980s and 1990s. A McLaren car emblazoned with Marlboro's white and red colours was perhaps most symbolic of that.

Phillip Morris, the Marlboro owner, decided to part ways with McLaren in 1996 and team up with Ferrari, and – despite the ban – they remain the team's title sponsor to this day, .

Sponsorship from cigarettes stood at $244m in 2005, with British American Tobacco and Mild Seven each contributing at least $50m, but since 2007 Marlboro's sponsorship of Ferrari has stood alone, worth $100m a year from 2007 to 2012 and $50m a year since.

The duo have tried to work around the rules and were accused of using subliminal branding on Ferrari's car, although a barcode design was banned by motor racing chiefs in 2010 on the grounds that it represented the cigarette maker. Marlboro continue to use their relationship for exclusive hospitality, corporate events and to host B2B clients.

New revenue

While there has been a significant revenue reduction in some sectors, others have stepped up to take on a share of the load. Beverages have been a key part of that, increasing by 429 per cent between 2005 and 2017.

Some of that increase can be owed to Martini, which has been the Williams team's title sponsor since 2014 in a deal worth $115m over five years, although that will not run into 2019 after the iconic brand decided to pull out of Formula One.

Force India have been the biggest beneficiaries of beverage sponsorship in the last two years, thanks in particular to a $30m-per-year deal with water company BWT, while Mercedes have a $10m-per-year deal with energy drink company Monster. Red Bull's advertising is not included due to the company's ownership of both Red Bull Racing and Toro Rosso.

However, a number of these deals are under threat as the World Health Organisation attempts to send alcoholic and fizzy drink adverts the same way as tobacco.

There has been an increasing reliance upon fashion products too, with Red Bull striking a lucrative deal with Tag Heuer worth $30m a season since 2016. Ferrari also hold multiple deals in this sector, including with the likes of Ray-Ban, Puma, Swisse and Hublot, while Williams have a $15m-per-year contract with Rexona, better known in the UK as Sure.

While some sectors have provided more sponsorship revenue in recent years, the sums involved from fashion and beverage brands do not match those from telecommunication and tobacco brands, even from over a decade ago.

Formula One is facing a battle to keep attracting lucrative sponsorship deals that independent teams such as Williams are particularly reliant upon. The trends suggest that teams may have to start generating revenue from other sectors or look at new income streams entirely.

For comprehensive data on Formula One's sponsorship revenue, visit
https://sponsors.formulamoney.com

http://www.cityam.com/270535/formula...ting-lucrative
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post #40 of 689 Old 12-14-2018, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
 
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formula1.com
THE STATE OF PLAY: Ross Brawn on 2021 regulations plus budgets and revenues

By Lawrence Barretto

At this time of the year, thoughts are naturally turning to 2019. But the teams, the FIA and F1 also have a firm eye on 2021: a season that should mark the dawn of a new era. The hope is for a new car, with a new engine, competing within a budget cap in a championship that has a fairer revenue distribution.

Such a dramatic overhaul can’t be rushed, of course. Several talks have taken place, several more are planned. Concepts have been produced, proposals discussed.

Next year will see new aerodynamic rules, focused predominantly around the front wing, and give us a snapshot of what to expect. So with just over two years to go, what is the current state of play?

2019 changes a snapshot for 2021

One of biggest criticisms of the current generation of F1 cars is that they can’t get close enough to each other, which obviously makes overtaking difficult. So when F1 started looking at designs for 2021, making the cars more raceable was at the core of the plans. The first phase of achieving this aim will come in 2019, with the move to bigger, wider, simpler front wings, which several squads tested iterations of during in-season testing this year.

These have been refined by teams throughout the year and will be one of the defining features of the new cars when they hit the track in pre-season testing in Barcelona in February. It’s a snapshot into what we may see in the future. “What we learn from this aero programme will be very important for the next bigger step, in 2021,” says F1 motorsport boss Ross Brawn. “The point to stress is it’s a philosophy and a culture, not just a one-stop solution.

“If we don’t achieve everything we want to achieve with these changes, we’ll learn from it, press on and carry on with the next phase of changes and we’ll keep doing that until we get the cars in a form when they can race each other much more effectively, which they can’t at the moment. It’s useful to see if the teams have been able to evolve and take different directions because we don’t want to discover that in 2021.”

FIA and F1 chiefs have opted to increase the span of and simplify the front wing, to make it less susceptible to ‘dirty air’ coming off the car in front and more focused on downforce generation. The hope is that this, along with a wider and deeper rear wing, will promote closer racing, which in turn will increase opportunities for overtaking.

“Until the cars run, we don’t know what solutions they have made, but from predictions, we’re achieving about 20% improvement,” says Brawn. “So we’re about a quarter of the way there to where we think we could be. But it’s not a one-stop shop in the sense that you do this and then you don’t touch it anymore.”

Formula One World Championship
The 2021 aero regulations are taking shape

Cars that look so good, kids want to have posters of them on their walls. That’s in the back of the mind of those who are working on the aerodynamic regulations for the 2021 season. Earlier this year, a series of concepts were released to show the direction F1 and the FIA are taking with regards design.

Research and development have continued though the year, with teams also being asked to chip in and help. As a result, the World Motor Sport Council confirmed teams can run unrestricted simulations on the development of 2021 cars. The programme has been split between the teams who have chosen to take part, with the work controlled and approved by the FIA with the results shared with F1’s research group.

“The FIA and ourselves have issued a framework of what the car could be like with tasks for each team to look at aspects of it,” says Brawn. “It’s not enough for teams to go off and start designing a car, we’re purposefully trying to hold back on that.

“We don’t want teams with a lot of resource to gain a march on those who don’t. But it’s a difficult balance because there is a perfectly valid argument that the later you leave the issuing of the information, the more it suits the teams with a lot of resource.

“The teams will have about a year or so to work on the designs of these cars, I think that’s the right sort of timescale. Once they’ve designed their 2020 cars, they need to be able to focus on 2021.”

Such a big regulation change offers scope for a mix up in the pecking order, of course. In 2008, McLaren and Ferrari developed to the death as they fought for the championship. That left them on the backfoot in 2009, when the regulations changed dramatically, with BrawnGP and Red Bull the two leading outfits.

“Whenever you introduce fairly major conceptual change in the regulations, the opportunity exists for a team to devote its resource to that project and leapfrog a year – accept where it is and that it might not be the greatest year – in favour of jumping up to where they want to be the following year,” adds Brawn.

Formula One Testing
Power unit formula in good shape

The power units are being tweaked, too, with the intention of encouraging the current manufacturers to stay while also making it viable for new entrants to join the fray. There has been a lot of back and forth, but at last there seems to be a compromise.

“The drawbridge has been pulled up and the existing suppliers don’t want anyone else to come in,” says Brawn. “We have found a compromise. There are regulations coming out which would mean new entrants will get support from existing entrants. There will be components and technology which will have to be shared if it is requested.

“It is not quite such a radical change that we were proposing, but still quite a good step in the right direction and there are some nice changes to the way the driver has to manage the engine, which I think goes a long way in the sporting direction.

“There has been a recognition from the existing manufacturers that they can’t shut the door behind them. If we start to get serious interest from another manufacturer or supplier, they have to cooperate to find ways of helping that manufacturer come into F1.”

Formula One World Championship
Progress on the budget cap

A control on costs has been a key focus in discussions for 2021. But when the idea of a budget cap has been floated in the past, it died a death soon after.

It’s not as simple as just agreeing a figure. There also needs to be clarity as to what is included under the cap and what isn’t. There’s the policing of it, which will be a challenge given some teams are based across several sites. And then a framework is needed in case a team breaks the rules. It’s no wonder this is taking some time.

Talks are continuing with Brawn suggesting the sport is “on schedule” to introduce one for 2021. “We are having pretty constructive discussions with the teams,” he says. “Unlike previous initiatives, this budget cap is going to be embedded in the regulations of the sport.”

Alongside the budget cap, there will be an overhaul of the revenue structure, with many feeling the current system is unfair and weighted heavily in favour of certain teams.

If a fairer and equitable revenue system is agreed upon, it will likely mean teams such as Ferrari, Mercedes, Red Bull, McLaren and Williams, who currently receive additional payments for various reasons such as past success and commitment to the sport, will see their total income change.

“The fairer distribution [of revenues] among the teams is balanced out by the reduction in costs particularly by the big teams, so their bottom lines will be improved,” says Brawn. “If we follow the budget cap proposals, I can’t see a team in F1 which won’t be better off
https://www.formula1.com/en/latest/a...suGm00A4G.html
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post #41 of 689 Old 12-15-2018, 01:07 AM Thread Starter
 
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Pulls on flack jacket — As there is no F1 to watch this weekend why not Formula E

You can watch tomorrow on these channels --
https://www.fiaformulae.com/watch/wa...b64ffff7b44e3f


arstechnica.com
Formula E starts season 5 in Saudi Arabia with a faster electric race car
Formula E begins a new chapter this weekend—here's what to expect.

by JONATHAN M. GITLIN
12/14/2018

Most of the motorsports world takes a well-deserved break in December. The long Formula 1 championship is done, as is the even longer NASCAR season. But this weekend, one series is about to get started: it's time for Formula E, which holds its first race of the 2018/2019 championship on Saturday. This is the fifth season for this electric racing championship, and it represents a new chapter for the sport as Formula E gets all-new cars and adds some new cities to the roster (including this weekend's race, which takes place in Ad Diriyah, Saudi Arabia).

Here at Ars, we've been fans of the all-electric racing series from day one. We were at the first-ever US race in Miami in 2015, and that same year two of the cars even carried our logo at the season finale in London. Since then, we've been regulars at the NYC ePrix, a two-day doubleheader that marks the conclusion of the championship. Electric cars racing on temporary street circuits in city centers represented quite a departure from your average racing series, and it's fair to say that Formula E has had to deal with a lot of skeptics. But we like people who try new things, and, over the course of the past four years, the sport has done a lot to win many naysayers over.

Still, season five feels like a big one. Big-name OEMs like Audi, BMW, Jaguar, Nissan, and DS will all field teams alongside electric vehicle specialists like Nio and Venturi. Mercedes-Benz and Porsche are both waiting in the wings. Here's what's new and what to expect when the green flag waves on Saturday.

New cars

For the inaugural season, each team used completely identical Spark-Renault SRT_01 race cars, but slowly the rules have opened up to allow for some technical development. What is and isn't allowed is more restrictive than series like Formula 1 or the World Endurance Championship, but these days there's as much freedom to innovate as you'd see in NASCAR or IndyCar. Each team is allowed to design its own motors, gearboxes, and electronics—all areas with direct road-relevance for electric car development—but they will continue to use identical chassis, tires, and batteries to keep the costs down and the racing close.

FURTHER READING
Formula E’s new electric car looks like nothing else in racing
Formula E first showed off its new car—called the Spark SRT05e—almost a year ago. The gen2 car is a much wilder looking machine than the gen1 racer, but the most significant change is hidden from view deep inside. I am referring to the new battery pack, a 54kWh unit built by McLaren Applied Technologies, with cells developed by Lucid Motors. It's almost double the capacity of the old pack, and, as we'll see, that's going to have a few consequences for how the racing plays out.
The gen2 car is a good deal faster than the old machine, thanks to an increase in the allowed power output. (Check out the video below to see what I mean.) The powertrain layout remains the same, with a single motor feeding the rear wheels via a transmission. Maximum power is now up to 250kW (335hp), with 200kW (270hp) allowed during the race, and the cars can now regenerate up to 250kW under braking. For comparison, last year the cars' max power was 200kW (268hp), with 180kW (241hp) allowed in race mode, and it could only regen 150kW (201hp) under braking.

New rules

Now that the cars have double the amount of energy, those mid-race pit stops to change cars are a thing of the past. (Since this always comes up in the comments, swappable batteries were considered for the gen1 car, but the series decided that such a system would have added even more weight to an already-heavy car.) But those pit stops added plenty of drama to each ePrix. So the sport has tweaked the race format a bit to leave in some of the uncertainty that makes for exciting racing.

For one thing, races are now no longer a preset number of laps; instead they're to be run to the clock. Each ePrix will last 45 minutes, plus an extra lap once that time elapses. And in addition to the much-maligned fan boost (which only applies to the three drivers who get the most social media support in the lead-up to the race), each driver can—in fact must—use the new Attack Mode during each race. At each track, there will be a different Attack Mode activation zone, a stretch of track off the racing line that drivers have to pass over to turn it on.

This unlocks an extra 25kW (34hp) for a predetermined time. That time will vary at each race, as will the number of times it has to be used. The teams are only given the exact location of the activation zone, as well as the number of times it has to be used and for how long, an hour before the race starts. That's meant to keep everyone on their toes, and it's consistent with Formula E's approach of limiting the amount of data the engineers in the pits have to help their drivers out during each race.

New races

The calendar also looks a little different compared to season four. As mentioned up top, things kick off in Saudi Arabia—the first international motorsports event to be held there. It's fair to say opinion is split over racing there. Over at Motor Sport, Joe Dunn wrote a convincing case for not racing in repressive regimes (sadly, that piece is not online). On the other hand, journalist Hazel Southwell made an equally good argument in favor of the event.

Bern, Switzerland, and Sanya, China, are two more new additions to the calendar, and the Santiago ePrix in Chile will race at a new location. Monaco makes its biennial appearance—this race happens every other year; Formula E and the historic races alternate annually before the famed Formula 1 race takes the streets of this principality. Sadly, the plan to use the full Formula 1 layout has been squashed by the killjoys at the FIA, for reasons that completely elude me. The heavier, less powerful, less grippy electric cars were in no danger of eclipsing the lap times of their vastly more expensive hybrid cousins, and no one makes the classic cars use a shorter layout for that event.

FURTHER READING
We talk with Bobby Rahal about the new Jaguar electric racing series
There's also going to be more racing at each ePrix. No, not the return of the slow-but-thrilling Formula E Schools races, unfortunately. Instead, it's the Jaguar I-Pace eTrophy, a one-make series using identical electric Jags. I'm very eager to see how this turns out because these one-make race series often deliver some great action—and also because I'm desperate to have a go in one since the I-Pace actually performs very well on track. (I know you have an extra car for invited drivers at each race, Jaguar, and I'll bring my own helmet and race boots to Brooklyn if you like.)
If you're located in the US, you can watch qualifying for the Al Diriyah ePrix on Fox Sports 2 at 5:30am ET on Saturday (December 15). The race will be broadcast directly afterward at 6:30am ET on Fox Sports 1. For those located elsewhere, consult this handy page to find out your local viewing times and options.
https://arstechnica.com/cars/2018/12...-this-weekend/
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post #42 of 689 Old 12-15-2018, 01:28 PM Thread Starter
 
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Hmm — even in a Mercedes, not a good start ….

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gpfans.com
Vandoorne's Formula E debut couldn't have gone much worse...

by Matthew Scott

A year to forget on the track for Stoffel Vandoorne ended in fitting circumstances after he finished third-last on his Formula E debut with the Mercedes-affiliated team HWA. Vandoorne started the season-opening Ad Diriyah E-Prix fourth, but was 17th when the chequered flag fell.


Vandoorne opted for a move to the all-electric series after he was dropped by McLaren on the back of a 2018 Formula 1 season in which he was outqualified by teammate Fernando Alonso in all 21 races.

Things appeared to be going better for the Belgian when he qualified fifth and was promoted another spot on the grid after penalties were applied.

However, he soon found himself going backwards and only Alex Sims and Edoardo Mortara – who crashed on the opening lap – finished behind him.

Another former F1 face on debut was Felipe Massa – the Brazilian finishing 14th with Venturi.

The race was won by Antonio Felix Da Costa, handing victory to BMW on the manufacturer's FE debut. Reigning champion Jean-Eric Vergne finished second after a thrilling race-long battle with the Portuguese driver, with Lucas Di Grassi rounding off the podium.

With new cars and new rules for drivers to handle, the attack mode zone offered the race a huge layer of intrigue, with cars given a four-minute power boost as a reward for running off-line.
https://www.gpfans.com/en/articles/3...ne-much-worse/
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post #43 of 689 Old 12-18-2018, 06:12 AM Thread Starter
 
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paddocktalk.com
Formula 1 News
ESPN Sees Viewership Growth, Positive Momentum in Formula 1

by: ASkyler
Dec 17, 2018

The recently-completed 2018 season for the FIA Formula One World Championship marked the return of the series to ESPN and ABC on American television and fans tuned in, making F1 the only major racing series to see year-over-year viewership growth in the U.S. for the season.

“Overall we were very pleased,” said Burke Magnus, ESPN executive vice president, programming and scheduling. “We knew that there were passionate F1 fans in the United States and we’re very happy that they navigated to our platforms and responded to our offerings.”

Over the course of the 21-race season, ESPN networks averaged 547,722 viewers for race windows airing on ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC, a two percent increase over the 2017 average of 538,114 across NBC, NBCSN and CNBC.

For all F1 events, ESPN networks aired live coverage of three practice sessions, qualifying and the race, with re-airs of the race telecast. ESPN, Sky Sports and Formula 1 also joined forces to bring Sky’s award-winning presentation for Formula 1 to American viewers. Beginning with the second race of the season, the live race telecasts were presented commercial-free.

Some other highlights from the season:
· ESPN’s live telecast of the Formula 1 Monaco Grand Prix averaged 820,000 viewers, the largest audience for an F1 telecast on cable since 1995.

· A Monaco encore telecast on ABC earned 1.6 million viewers, with the combined 2.4 million viewers representing a 41 percent rise over 2017’s combined NBC and NBCSN telecasts.

· The Bahrain and British Grand Prix telecasts saw the season’s largest year-over-year audience growth (up 67 percent and 39 percent, respectively).

· The Bahrain event averaged 692,014 viewers on ESPN2, at that point early in the season making it cable’s largest F1 audience since 2012.

· Telecasts of qualifying averaged 248,066 viewers in 2018, a year-over-year increase of 14 percent.

The relationship marked the return of Formula 1 to its original U.S. television home - the first race ever aired in the country was on ABC in 1962. F1 races also aired on ESPN from 1984-1997.
The 2019 Formula 1 season begins March 17 with the Australian Grand Prix
http://paddocktalk.com/news/html/story-324704.html
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post #44 of 689 Old 12-19-2018, 08:11 PM Thread Starter
 
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RACEFANS
F1 must address B-teams after ‘questionable on-track activities’ – Brown
2021 F1 season
19th December 2018
by Keith Collantine
“Questionable” on-track incidents during 2018 show it is “critical” for Formula 1 to tackle the rise of ‘B-teams’ according to McLaren Racing CEO Zak Brown.

Speaking today in response to a question from RaceFans, Brown said he expects F1’s commercial rights holder Liberty Media to impose new restrictions on relationship between manufacturer and customer teams from 2021.
“I think Liberty are going to address the ‘B team’ business model because I think it allows the ‘A teams’ to benefit from the B-teams,” he said. “That benefit is everything from technical to political to on-track activities [we’ve seen] this year which I think people believe were questionable,” Brown did not indicate which teams or races he was referring to.

“All three of those scenarios are not what Formula 1 is about and need to change for the health of the sport,” he added. “And I believe they will. Liberty have that in their plan to address B teams and to what degree you can be a B team.”

Haas finished fifth in the championship this year despite having the lowest headcount and one of the smallest budgets in F1. It makes use of F1’s ‘listed parts’ regulations to obtain as much technology as it can from suppliers.

Brown described Haas’s performance as “excellent” but said McLaren will not adopt a similar business model as he does not believe a B team could become a championship contender.

“Haas has done a very good job working within the rules that sit in Formula 1 today. However our belief is a B-team will never be able to compete with an A-team. Therefore while going to that business model in the very short-term could potentially make you more competitive quicker and be potentially a better proposition I think you are giving up on any hopes of racing as a championship contender and that is McLaren’s intent.

“Therefore going to a B-team status you’re kind of throwing in the towel of being a championship contender. Therefore we think it is extremely important – I would say critical – that Liberty in the new Formula 1 world in 2021 address that so all teams can have a fair and equal chance to compete for the championship on an equal, level playing field. And I believe that’s what Chase [Carey, F1 CEO] will go through with.”
https://www.racefans.net/2018/12/19/...ivities-brown/
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post #45 of 689 Old 12-19-2018, 08:26 PM Thread Starter
 
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autosport.com
Renault has found 'a lot of kilowatts' for 2019 F1 engine - McLaren
By Jonathan Noble
@NobleF1
December 19th 2018
Renault has found "a lot of kilowatts" in the development of its 2019 Formula 1 engine, customer team McLaren has been told.
While the French manufacturer failed to do enough last year to convince Red Bull to keep using its engines, the early indications are that it has made decent steps with work for 2019, when it will power its works team and McLaren.
Speaking to selected media on Wednesday, McLaren CEO Zak Brown revealed there was a mood of optimism coming out of Renault about its potential for next year.
"They are telling us that they are very pleased with their winter progress," said Brown.
"They have found a lot of kilowatts, and think they will be in the ballpark.
"It is not appropriate for me to quote the numbers they have given us, but I think they feel they are going to be very competitive next year."
Any step forward from Renault will be a boost to McLaren, which is hoping to recover from a disappointing 2018 campaign that fell short of expectations. While the team accepts there is no quick fix that will get it back to the front of the grid in the short term, Brown says the feedback from his engineering and design team is positive.
"There is a lot of cautious optimism, but we clearly don't want to get ahead of ourselves," he said.
"We have done that before and we are not going to make the same mistake twice.
"So it is a very head down approach. Development is going well, and we are on track with what we are wanting to achieve.
"But ultimately we have no idea where the competition is, other than speculating.
"Everyone plants their different stories: they either want to under play it or over play it. I don't think we will obviously know until we get to Barcelona [for pre-season testing].
"We are pleased with the progress we have made. We have done things differently, everyone is working well together, so it feels like a quiet confidence.
"But we are on our toes. We know this is an important year for us to show progress and that comes with some exciting nervous energy."
https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/14...-2019--mclaren
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