600LT Salomondrin - Page 2 - McLaren Life
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post #16 of 27 Old 03-20-2019, 06:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NVMcLaren View Post
Very difficult if not impossible to get track insurance for P1. They usually top out at about 300k total car value. And only specific tracks. Ive tracked mine a few times, but self insured.
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Things have changed. Almost all track insurance companies limit the agreed value if you are getting per event coverage.

Annual track policies don't have a limit (example; opentrack.com). 10% deductible (agreed value above $300K and premium is about 3% of the agreed value).

Pretty high premiums but worth it if a person is going to be heavily tracking throughout the year. (FYI - I also self insure and stay in my limits with P1).
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post #17 of 27 Old 03-20-2019, 07:35 PM
 
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Things have changed. Almost all track insurance companies limit the agreed value if you are getting per event coverage.

Annual track policies don't have a limit (example; opentrack.com). 10% deductible (agreed value above $300K and premium is about 3% of the agreed value).

Pretty high premiums but worth it if a person is going to be heavily tracking throughout the year. (FYI - I also self insure and stay in my limits with P1).
for 75k USD plus per year (3% of 2.5m) and that is only the insurance plus you will have immense cost to track a P1 a lot I would more think about a dedicated track car in the 250-350k range

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post #18 of 27 Old 03-20-2019, 07:46 PM
 
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for 75k USD plus per year (3% of 2.5m) and that is only the insurance plus you will have immense cost to track a P1 a lot I would more think about a dedicated track car in the 250-350k range
I had never considered tracking up to 3 years ago. The only reason I learned was so that I could track P1 competently. It is just so rewarding to track a P1 and mix it up with other cars.

I think it would have been a big regret later in life if I didn't/hadn't tracked it.
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post #19 of 27 Old 03-20-2019, 08:29 PM
 
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I had never considered tracking up to 3 years ago. The only reason I learned was so that I could track P1 competently. It is just so rewarding to track a P1 and mix it up with other cars.

I think it would have been a big regret later in life if I didn't/hadn't tracked it.
yes certainly, but what I mean is you wont hurt your car if you don't have a dedicated car to hurt ... I don't track my cars, but I know some ppl who are quiet good at that even getting paid quiet some money to drive around in circles for most part of their life and/or on some really bad roads and they never hurt street cars they own ... their track cars or company owned track cars however is a totally other story

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2019: 720s MSO Atlantic Blue
2010: MB SLS coupe
1957: MB 300SL Roadster
1956: Porsche 356 Conv. A 1600S
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post #20 of 27 Old 03-20-2019, 11:18 PM
 
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Hmmm, you can say the same thing about your car then and a 650....instead of buying the 675LT buy a 650, do mods and better tires and it will be just as fun....come on bud...two completely different cars. The 650 and 675LT in my eyes can not be compared - alot of improvements and the same goes for the 570S and the 600LT. You know better...
Not really, aside from just adding power (there was a fair amount of engine work I think too, which I dont know if the 600Lt got as well, I haven't read anything about that) there was a lot of interesting things done to the suspension and traction settings if I recall right. the 675/650s use of the active suspension made it a bit more involved to do.

I didnt say they would be the same. What I said was the 570S is more than capable of being a fun drivers car, it just lack a bit of the drama the 600Lt gives. I was looking at a 600LT myself but I could not see why its almost 720S money after I speced it. Thats just my opinion, and as I said, 600Lt is an awesome car, I just personally feel the 570S could offer the same kind of fun with very minimal extra money spent.

Last edited by PieGuy; 03-20-2019 at 11:37 PM.
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post #21 of 27 Old 03-20-2019, 11:21 PM
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for 75k USD plus per year (3% of 2.5m) and that is only the insurance plus you will have immense cost to track a P1 a lot I would more think about a dedicated track car in the 250-350k range
And track insurance isnt going to cover depreciated value, ie if you bin a P1, that car will be worth -10%, maybe more, even after its repaired. Obviously not an issue if you plan to keep the car forever. But for $200k/$300k you can buy a real nice track car, like a 570GT4.
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post #22 of 27 Old 03-21-2019, 01:34 AM
 
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And track insurance isnt going to cover depreciated value, ie if you bin a P1, that car will be worth -10%, maybe more, even after its repaired. Obviously not an issue if you plan to keep the car forever. But for $200k/$300k you can buy a real nice track car, like a 570GT4.
that was my thinking too

Current Cars:

2019: 720s MSO Atlantic Blue
2010: MB SLS coupe
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post #23 of 27 Old 04-24-2019, 09:00 PM
 
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The real difference in a Senna vs the others is downforce. No street driver knows what real down force is like nor how to handle it as speeds increase over 100mph. Watch Nico Rosbergs vid on driving the Senna and he describes it as an F1 driver should. If a person doesn't have experience with high downforce cars, they won't know how to use the Senna as it was intended to be used.
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post #24 of 27 Old 04-24-2019, 11:36 PM
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The real difference in a Senna vs the others is downforce. No street driver knows what real down force is like nor how to handle it as speeds increase over 100mph. Watch Nico Rosbergs vid on driving the Senna and he describes it as an F1 driver should. If a person doesn't have experience with high downforce cars, they won't know how to use the Senna as it was intended to be used.
Absolutely no question.

Case in point I can take turn 1 at laguna in a 911 at 80 mph (im guessing). In the P1, also 80 mph, no problem. At 90 mph, you will spin. At 100 mph, now its no problem again. What I mean to say is if you are experienced and know what you are doing then things are great, if not, then things go badly for you. High downforce is not for rookies. Its totally doable, and kuddos to mclaren for building programs that promote skill development. But at 100mph++ the margin of error is so small it makes a huge difference so you really need to work through that.

how many of us p1 owners had a active aero fault at speed and needed a change of clothes afterwords?
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post #25 of 27 Old 04-25-2019, 03:44 AM
 
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I'm not convinced the math works out for the scenario you mention above. The only way it could possibly make sense is with regards to the tire because the coefficient of friction is dependant on tire temperature which is a function of load (downforce and weight) . Coefficient of friction typically decreases with increase in normal force, but with increased temperature, I'm sure the trend changes for rubber compound. This whole thing gets really complicated and is not in my wheelhouse, but assuming a constant Mu, there is no point where you can't corner at a lower speed below the maximum cornering speed possible and then go faster (at or below maximum corner speed) and be able to corner.
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post #26 of 27 Old 04-25-2019, 03:56 AM
 
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I'm not convinced the math works out for the scenario you mention above. The only way it could possibly make sense is with regards to the tire because the coefficient of friction is dependant on tire temperature which is a function of load (downforce and weight) . Coefficient of friction typically decreases with increase in normal force, but with increased temperature, I'm sure the trend changes for rubber compound. This whole thing gets really complicated and is not in my wheelhouse, but assuming a constant Mu, there is no point where you can't corner at a lower speed below the maximum cornering speed possible and then go faster (at or below maximum corner speed) and be able to corner.
The coefficient of friction model doesn't apply for rubber, otherwise there'd be no point to wider tyres (other than wear area). Downforce increases with the square of speed, as does the centripetal force required. Tyre temperature will also come into play, so it's entirely believable that higher speeds may work better.
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post #27 of 27 Old 04-25-2019, 04:05 AM
 
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Actually, it does, but it's complicated. And really beyond most people's comprehension, I'd have to think about it a little longer. Coefficient of friction is a function of nominal contact pressure as well (which is dependant on contact area).

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1512.01359.pdf

Tire temperature absolutely plays a major role in this.

All I am saying is that there's a lot more variables to consider. Especially if using tire blankets to get up to proper operating temperatures
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