What Happens When You Take Dad's McLaren 675LT Spider - McLaren Life
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By Boxer
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
post #1 of 7 Old 10-14-2018, 01:47 PM Thread Starter
InnerCircle
Owner
 
Boxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: UK & Texas
Posts: 2,433
What Happens When You Take Dad's McLaren 675LT Spider

New Bad Driver article: http://karenable.com/2018/10/bad-dri...-675lt-spider/

Feedback for him?
SSIIICK likes this.
Boxer is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 7 Old 10-14-2018, 03:59 PM
Spec 570 Spider soon
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: St. Louis, MO USA
Posts: 315
Boxer, take it from me as a former newspaper and magazine writer, editor and publisher -

He's not only a "Bad" Driver, he's also a "Bad" Writer. Tell him, "Thanks" for me.

An adage from the misspent youth of my skydiving days: "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast..."
Bob_D is offline  
post #3 of 7 Old 10-14-2018, 11:33 PM Thread Starter
InnerCircle
Owner
 
Boxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: UK & Texas
Posts: 2,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob_D View Post
Boxer, take it from me as a former newspaper and magazine writer, editor and publisher -

He's not only a "Bad" Driver, he's also a "Bad" Writer. Tell him, "Thanks" for me.
I'll make sure to pass that along.

Anything constructive to say by chance?
Boxer is offline  
 
post #4 of 7 Old 10-15-2018, 02:06 AM
Spec 570 Spider soon
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: St. Louis, MO USA
Posts: 315
He's already writing what he knows, from personal experience - that's always good. My mentor, in his words, had to "knock the business school out of me" to become a good writer...don't see that problem here.

I was always taught that the more you compact your writing, the better it gets. It forces you to find the right words that convey tons of meaning and imagery using the fewest syllables. It always worked for me!

An adage from the misspent youth of my skydiving days: "Slow is smooth, and smooth is fast..."
Bob_D is offline  
post #5 of 7 Old 10-15-2018, 02:37 AM Thread Starter
InnerCircle
Owner
 
Boxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: UK & Texas
Posts: 2,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob_D View Post
He's already writing what he knows, from personal experience - that's always good. My mentor, in his words, had to "knock the business school out of me" to become a good writer...don't see that problem here.

I was always taught that the more you compact your writing, the better it gets. It forces you to find the right words that convey tons of meaning and imagery using the fewest syllables. It always worked for me!
Thats quite helpful, thanks. I will pass it along.
Boxer is offline  
post #6 of 7 Old 10-15-2018, 01:47 PM
 
Ramy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Riyadh.
Posts: 259
Hey again, Boxer!

Smiled with familiarity at this post.
A similarly rare situation - shared moments of youth with my father in some memorable machinery.
Both sanct and skillful.

Glad to hear the children are inheriting the driving experiences.
Cars are transient, yet the moments shared and skills acquired aren't.

On moments, two decades have passed since my first driving experiences.
Yet, I remember every word shared, at what speed, and at what curve with a dream-like timelessness.
A meld of machine that took us through roads, and the man that guides us through them. Incisive.

On skill, they pervade far beyond physical roads.
Especially when granted the responsibility of powerful machines young:
"The car drives itself. You're only guiding it."
"Eyes move before you do, always."
"Pace is relative to ability, and ability requires precision."
"The faster and heavier you are, the longer your brake line."
"That sound of the ignition means the life of those around you, your passengers, and yours is now in your hands. Weigh that well."

The practical skill that I found most useful was road-driving reflex training, and driving modulation at different speed sets:

Drilling the obvious vision-driving coordination methods until they become subconscious rules and reflex.
And then, training them for the road accident prevention scenarios.

Example: Common sense, but always applying a split-second 'vision-action' of front, rear-view, then front again in the direction of the turn or lane transition.
Then, practicing applying that reflex of 'vision-action' in the opposite direction of another car breaking into my line.
Ie, if car breaks in from the left, look right rear view and then move into clear line. Overcomes the brake hard and vision lock reflex most untrained people have.

Nurturing a reflex to look out the front dash every two seconds.
Breaks the momentary lapses of road concentration even the most experienced of us fall into.

And the practice of understanding car dynamics at differing and higher speeds.

As for learning manual, entry-level V4 FWDs offered depth of modulation and technique.
(And a relatively affordable tyre and pad budget given the extensive and intense 'practice' expense that fourteen year-old could afford and keep somewhat hidden. Oh, the era of handbrakes.)

Thousands of exotic car owners, but rarer are the 'drivers'.
He'll be one.

The father's in good health, and I'll be calling him shortly to relive those memories.
Thank you.

Do enjoy. I sure did.
Ramy is offline  
post #7 of 7 Old 10-15-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Posts: 363
I learned to drive in the San Francisco Bay Area. My dad taught me how to drive a stickshift. Bill Cosby captured the experience perfectly, in "Driving in San Francisco".

I got to be pretty good with a clutch and stick, but now I have this DCT and my skills are atrophying.
scottch is offline  
post #8 of 7 Old 10-16-2018, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
InnerCircle
Owner
 
Boxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: UK & Texas
Posts: 2,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ramy View Post
Hey again, Boxer!

Smiled with familiarity at this post.
A similarly rare situation - shared moments of youth with my father in some memorable machinery.
Both sanct and skillful.

Glad to hear the children are inheriting the driving experiences.
Cars are transient, yet the moments shared and skills acquired aren't.

On moments, two decades have passed since my first driving experiences.
Yet, I remember every word shared, at what speed, and at what curve with a dream-like timelessness.
A meld of machine that took us through roads, and the man that guides us through them. Incisive.

On skill, they pervade far beyond physical roads.
Especially when granted the responsibility of powerful machines young:
"The car drives itself. You're only guiding it."
"Eyes move before you do, always."
"Pace is relative to ability, and ability requires precision."
"The faster and heavier you are, the longer your brake line."
"That sound of the ignition means the life of those around you, your passengers, and yours is now in your hands. Weigh that well."

The practical skill that I found most useful was road-driving reflex training, and driving modulation at different speed sets:

Drilling the obvious vision-driving coordination methods until they become subconscious rules and reflex.
And then, training them for the road accident prevention scenarios.

Example: Common sense, but always applying a split-second 'vision-action' of front, rear-view, then front again in the direction of the turn or lane transition.
Then, practicing applying that reflex of 'vision-action' in the opposite direction of another car breaking into my line.
Ie, if car breaks in from the left, look right rear view and then move into clear line. Overcomes the brake hard and vision lock reflex most untrained people have.

Nurturing a reflex to look out the front dash every two seconds.
Breaks the momentary lapses of road concentration even the most experienced of us fall into.

And the practice of understanding car dynamics at differing and higher speeds.

As for learning manual, entry-level V4 FWDs offered depth of modulation and technique.
(And a relatively affordable tyre and pad budget given the extensive and intense 'practice' expense that fourteen year-old could afford and keep somewhat hidden. Oh, the era of handbrakes.)

Thousands of exotic car owners, but rarer are the 'drivers'.
He'll be one.

The father's in good health, and I'll be calling him shortly to relive those memories.
Thank you.

Do enjoy. I sure did.
Sounds like this spiked a few wonderful memories. Thats truly wonderful.
Boxer is offline  
post #9 of 7 Old 10-16-2018, 07:31 PM Thread Starter
InnerCircle
Owner
 
Boxer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: UK & Texas
Posts: 2,433
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottch View Post
I learned to drive in the San Francisco Bay Area. My dad taught me how to drive a stickshift. Bill Cosby captured the experience perfectly, in "Driving in San Francisco". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOmayx2JBs8

I got to be pretty good with a clutch and stick, but now I have this DCT and my skills are atrophying.
I remember that skit well. Had a few similar experiences.

On the atrophying, its one of the reasons I bought the Porsche 997.2 GT3 RS as that had started to happen to me as well.
Boxer is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the McLaren Life forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools Search this Thread
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome